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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01776 7697 



GENEALOGY 
974 
SA32D 
1901 



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The 



Genealogical Quarterly 

Magazine 



AND 



Magazine of New JEngland History 



VOL. II. 



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Edited by EBEN PUTNAM. 



Burlington, Vt., U. S. A. 
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A3JD KA(ihmiB OF NEW EFGLA^D HlgTOEY. 










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APRIL, 1901 



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Published by EiEN PUTNAM, 49 North Prospect St., e.,-.,„gton, Vt. 



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. fWB CNT«Y AT THE POSTOFriCC AT ay^UWGTO,^ 



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^'fEB G-EEEALOGICAL QUAE,TEKLY MAaAZIKE ispi^l. 
" ~ liehed in Apnl^ Jtily, October^ and December, at Four. Doll ai 
per aimura (or three dollars if paid in advance). Smgle number 
One Dollar, 



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CONTENTS, APRIL, ipai. 

Pa 

E?*t>ex County, Mass., Couil Recoi'a&, iJJi/ 

Great Barrin^Tton, Mass., Church Records, (St. James Episcopal Church) copied . . . . . 
b;v' L. H.-voa Sahler, incladifig toTvUi^ o' 

Lee, (Hopl&ndsj, 1781-1792 ........./. 

Lan^slioro, 1T73-17G3 

* ..WiUiiiBsto^a, 1775-1784 . . : . . . . . 

"Wasiiingtou, (HfirtTi^cod), 1774 

XeTp AsMordi 1776 . . 

Sandii^field, 17V5-1701 . . . . 

Alford, 1777-178? 

Ada.7 >;, 17ft3 

Mount "WashiDgtori, (laconic), 1784 

Kew !^iT'horo, 1785-1790 . 

jnUrifleld, 1775-1700 

Oti5 (Cwf^.lchem), 17yi .......... .^ . ... ............... 

A Pftrtia! Kecord oC the Mansnr Family, by John H. Mansnr 

Baptismal TJc. ords of tho Pirst Church, Burlington, Vt.,„i811-iS/uO, cor>ied by ■ 

Walter H. Clock ett . .^w^^V. . . . . ;'■ , ,..,,.. 

Wf..lpo.\e, N. H,, Record of Births, 1759-1776, copied by Rev. W. S. Nichols ... ... 

List ol Eslati'S, settlemeius of >\hicb are recorded in Ma^^g. Archives, 

YoLXVI., 1CC6-1697 

vTouathan Prince, Jr., ITisBook, 1753 

English Ver^>ion of the Battle of Stony Creels • • • 

Book Notes ... 

Queries 

Notes 



Exchanges and books for review should be addressed to the edHor, Ebj 
Putnam, 49 North Prospect Street, Burlington, Vt. 



Essex County, Mass., Records. 

The editor of this magazine has for sale or exchange a miscellaneous lot of numbers of « 
" Essex Institute Historical Collections," including a complete set. The ** Collections *V canti 
complete transcripts of many of the early Town and Church Records of Essex Coiinly in 'ftddUi 
to gencalogicf of many Essex County families. 



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Marriage Notices for tlie Whole . Uiiii 

17 7 5-1894. 

Copied from the files of the Massachusetts Centinel and Colujnbiaii Center 
alphabetically arranged. With a preface and occasional note?; 

8vo. Paper. Price, $2.00. By CHARLES KNOWLES J^OLTON. 
FOR SALG BY EBEN PUTNAM, BURLINOTON, VT. 



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CONTENTS. 






A 

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Andover, Mass., Births, etc., 1659, 134 

Bellows, Ezra, of Lunenburg, and Descendants, by T. B. Peck, 73 

Book Notices : — 

History of Norfolk, Conn., 57 

Record of My Ancestry, Newhall, • • 57 

Commonplace-Book of Richard Pratt, 58 

Cycle Days of New England, 58 

Contributions to History of Old Derryfield, 58 

Sketch of the Munroe Clan, 59 

Memorials of the Quisenberry Family, 60 

Historic Duxbury, 60 

Report on Massachusetts Public Records, 61 

Plymouth County Marriages, 6a 

Historical Sketches of an Octogenarian, 62 

Daniel Hovey of Ipswich, 63 

Ancestral Chart (Guild), 64 

Ancient Burial Place of New London, 64 

Family Records of Some Descendants of Robert Francis, 65 

Lexington, Mass., Birtlis, etc., 65 

Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper Co., Va., 65 

The German and Swiss Settlements of Colonial Pennsylvania, • ^55 . 

The Germans in Colonial Times, 25 5 

History of Maiden, Mass., 92 

Samuel Slade Benton, His Ancestors and Descendants, 174 

Comprehensive Method of Arrangement of Genealogical Records, ..... 288 

Genealogy of Sanrruel and John Bishop, 288 

Tarleton Family, 289 

Cornet Joseph Parsons, One of the Founders of Springfield and Northampton, . 290 

Year Book of the Ohio S. A. R., 1898, •....; 291 

Proceedings of the John Bean Association, 1900, 291 

Maryland Calendar of Wills, Vol, I., 29a 

Supplement to the Descendants of Nathaniel Mowry, 292 

Descendants of William Towne, 293 

Archives of Maryland : Muster Rolls, etc., in Revolution, . , 227 

Genealogy of the Family of Lt. Samuel Benjamin, 228 

History of Stonington, Conn., 228 

Downers of America, 230 

Mansur Family, 230 

Index to Taintor's Colchester, Conn., Records, 230 

History of the Putnam Family in England and America, 231 

Waters' Genealogical Gleanings in England, 231 

Burlington, Vt., Church Records, i8ii-20, copied by Walter H. Crockett, .... 44 



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CONTENTS. 



Converse. Some Ancestral Lines of Charles A., 95 

(Converse, Allen, Prentis, Hawks, Smead, Lamberton, Griswold, Wolcott, 
Rogers. ) 

Doctor of Laws, Degree of, and its Significance, by W. DeW. Hyde, 85 

Essex Count)', Mass., Court Records, from the Derby MSS., 1, 1 28, 203 

German Migration to the American Colonies, 255 

Great Barrington, Mass., Church Records, copied by L. H. von Sahler, .... 16 
Including the towns of 

Lee, 1781-92 Adams, ly^J 

Lanesboro, ....'... 1773-93 Mt. Washington, 1784 

Williamstown, 1775-84 New Marlboro, 1785-90 

Washington, 1774 Pittsfield, 1775-90 

New Ashford, ^775 Tyringham, . 1790-93 

Sandisfield, 1775-91 Otis, 1791 

Alford, 1777-82 

Harpswell, Me., Genealogical Records, ■ , 179 

Hcadley Note, .....'...... I78 

Index to Vol. I., Genealogical Quarterly Magazine, i 

Index to Vol. II., Genealogical Quarterly Magazine, 297 

Joiner, William, 93 

Joiner-Moore-Pryor Queries, 14 

Lebanon, N. H., Vital Records, 1765-1789, copied by Byron N. Clark, .... 233 

Lebanon, N. H,, Cemetery Inscriptions, copied by Byron N. Clark, 248 

Mansur Genealogy, by John H. Mansur, 29, 105, 185 

Massachusetts Estates, List of Settlements Recorded in Archives XVI, 1666-97, . . 49 

Newbury, Births, etc., 1659, 1 36 

New England and Southern Influences in the Middle West, by Prof, F. J. Turntr, . . 2G6 

New London, Conn., Births, etc., 1644-67, ... 282. 

Nichols-McWain Families, 90 

Notes, '69- 

Pawnee Republic, -9^ 

Prince, Jona., Jr., his Book (diary), 1753, from original in possession of Edward 

Prince, • 5 1 

Queries, 67, 94, 213, 226, 287 

Revolutionary American Prisoners at Quebec, from the Haldimand papers, . . 149, 183 

Rowley, Mass., Births, etc., 1659, 135 

""—'Salem First Meeting House, illustrated, loi 

-"^alem Tax List for 1683, •. 167 

^--sSalem Town Records, Gleanings from, 1659-82, .'...... 153 

Stony Creek, English Version of the Battle of, 54 

Story of a New England Family, Benton, 274. 

Tingley Genealogy, by Eben Putnam, 214 

Walpole, N. H., Births, copied by Rev. W. S. Nichols, • . . 47 

Watertown, Mass., Records, illustration from, opposite page 153. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 



(Continued from Decemhcr, 1900. j 

(5) 

[8] Charles Browne, and wife deps : that six or seven years 
since, in the meeting house of Rowley, being in the Gallarye, 
in the first seat there was one in the second seat, he believed was 
John Godfrey, and seeing him yawn open his mouth saw a small 
teat under his tongue. And three years after said Godfrey 
being at said Browne's house and speaking of the power of 
witches he said the devil would appear unto them and ask if 
they were not grieved or vexed with anybody and ask what he 
should do for them. 

William Osgood testifies, naming Mr. Spencer and his herds- 
man, John Godfrey. 

Miscellaneous Papers, 28 : i : 1659. 

[9] Pitman, Thomas, of Marblehead, constable ; his com- 
plaint to Court that James Smith and wife, of Marblehead, 
Qiiakers, do not attend public worship. 

Batter, Edmond, of Salem, dep : aged about 50; that there 
is upon Salem Towne Records granted to Thomas Devenish, of 
Salem, 10 acres of land. March 30, 1659. 

Ipswich, A noat of what has bin disbur.-cd in this Town of 
Ipswich for the county. Mr. (John) Baker, Ipswich, named 
William Goodhue, Ipswich, Chairman of Selectmen; 3: 12: 

1658. 

[10] MouNTjoY, Benj., of Marblehead, Estate Inv. £19 : 2 : 
5. Wife of said Mountjoy chosen admn'x; Salem, 28 : 4 : mo. 
1659. William Charles, and Joseph Dalleuer (Dolliver), of 
Marblehead, appraisers. 

[11] WooDis, John, of Salem; will made 24:3:1659; 
proved 29 : 4 : 1659. Names Sam'll Very, Sr. ; Alice Very, 
wife of Sam'l and dau. of said Woodis; Thomas, John, Sam- 
uel, sons of Samuel ; Elizabeth and Sarah Very, daughters of 



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2 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

(6) 

Samuel: Emme Muse, a legatee; Samuel Verry, son-in-law, 
Ex'r; Thomas Antrum, Thomas Flhit, \Yltnesses. Inv. 69; 5. 
— 10:4: 1659. Thomas James, Thomas Flint, Thomas An- 
trum, appraisers. 

Leach, John, Sr., of Salem; Will: nuncupative. No date. 
Elizabeth Buxton and Mary Felton, deps : that beings both in 
one room about halfe a yeare before the decease of John Leach, 
Sr., the said John Leach coming in from worke he sayd unto 
us, he was so sicke he thought he should have fallen downe dead 
at his worke * * * John Leach, son of Richard, his sole lega- 
tee. [12] Inv'y £35 : 2s : — taken 20: 10: 165S. Daniel Rca, 
Henery Cooke, appraisers. 

List of Debts : Philip Veren, Adam Westgate, John Ingersoll, 

(7) 

Willyam Curtis, Ed. Beecham, of Salem; Tho. Ricks (Ruks?) 
of Boston ; John Burton, John Grouer, of Salem. 

[13] TopSFiELD, Inhabitants of, petition to Court by Zach- 
eus Gould ; (Fra)ncis Peabody in behalf of inhabitants. 

[14] JiGLES, Will., of Salem, Inv. £145 : 15s, — taken 26 : 

3 ; 1659. John Browne, John Gardner, Edm. Batter, appraisers. 
Inv. returned by widow Elizabeth Jigles ; 2S : 4 : 1659. Three 
children married long since ; the other abroad at sea ; eldest son 
in England, captain of ship. 

[15] Laskins, Hugh, of Salem. Inv. JC50 : 2: 10, taken 
March 21, 1658-9. John Maston, Sam' 11 Pickman, appraisers. 
Debtors to the estate : Edmond Batter, Henry Bartholmew, 
Thomas Hayle, Willm Haskul, Roger Ilascall, all of Salem. 
Henry Herrick of Salem, appointed administrator. 

[16] Mansfield, Damaris, petition: -Tymothie Laskin, of 
Salem, her former husband, died leaving two smalPchildren. 

(8) 
Presentments, — June Term, 1659. 
[17] Smith, James, of Marblehead, for absenting himself 
from public worship. Thomas Pitman and William Charles of 
Marblehead, witnesses. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 3 

Rowland, Rich., of Marblehead, for sleeping in time of 
public ordinance. 

Gray, Tho., of Marblehead, for profane swearing. Wm. 
Charles, of Marblehead, witness. 

CoDNER, Christopher, of Marblehead, for striking Rich. 
Read. Tho. Ellis and Erasmus James, Jr., of Marblehead, 
witnesses. 

Hathorne, Major, of Salem, magistrate. 

Gloucester, Town of, for defects in their stocks. Jno. 
Pearse, of Gloucester, witness. 

ViNCEN, Wife of Wm., of Gloucester, for disturbance in 
meeting on Sabbath day. Jno. Davis and Jno. Pearse, wit- 
nesses. 

Gloucester, Town of, for want of a bridge over the Cutt 
in hands of William Stevens. Will Vincen, Jeffery Persons, 
witnesses. 

Crafte, Wm., of Lynn, for a pound breach. Dan. Salmon 
and Franc. Burrell. witnesses. 

Chadwell, Benaimin, of Lynn, for smoking tobacco near a 
house among combustible matter. Fr. Burrell, witness. 

Bread, Jno., of Lynn,' same offence. 



(9) •• 

Armetage, Joseph of Lynn, for drinking to excess. 
Wheeler, Georg Keisore, Ed. Richards, witnesses. 



Tho. 



Clerk, Sarah, of Salem, for stealing a silke scarfe from 
house of Jno. Putnam, Jr. She confessed to Tho. Putnam. 

Stackiiouse, Rich., of Salem, for abusing wife of Franc. 
Skery of Salem, saying she is a blot ; a reproach to the church ; 
a rotten member and scandal to the Gospel. Hen. Skery, Keth- 
rine Howard, witnesses. 



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' 4 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

For absence from public worship : — 

Gakdxer, wife of Geo., Needham, wife of Anthony 

Shattock, wife of Sam'l, Southwick, wife of Jno., 

Selman, Sani'll, Smith, wife of Jno., 

Wharton, Edw., Phelps, wife of Nich., 

Kitchen, wife of John, Southwick, Daniel, 

Buffum, wife of Rob., Southwick, Provided, 

Trask, wife of Hen., Small, Jno., all of Salem. 

(lO) 

Sergt. Jno. Porter, Corp. Tho. Putnam, Nich. Potter, Ed. 
Batter, witnesses to foregoing 14 cases. 

King, William, of vSalem, absence from public worship. Ed. 
Bishop, Roger Connant, witnesses. 

Ellet, wife of Wm., of Salem, for abusing wife of Jno. 
Rayment, saying she was a fire brand of hell for her lying 
tongue. Jno. Rayment, Wife of Edw. Bishop, witnesses. 

White, Elias, and William Wood, of Marblehead, for figlit- 
[ j ing in the ferry boat. Tho. Dixie. Jno. Codner, Edw. Reade, 

^ witnesses. 

I Batter, Edmund, of Salem, foreman Grand Jury. (Ipswich, 

j " Sept., 1659.) 



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Denison, Maj.-Gen. Dan';, of Ipswich, vs. Samuel Sy- 
monds, of Ipswich, for trespass in taking load of hay from 
his land. Daniel Denison, dep : that last July was 24 years 
when the line of partition between the farm granted to Mr. 
Dudley, and myself, and Mr. Winthrop, and Mr. Wade, and 
concluded by Mr. Wade, John Gage, and myself. Goodman 

(") 

Perkins, Goodman Shatswell, John Manning, witnesses to the 
laying out. Will Fellows, named. Sept. 27, 1659. Robert 
Lord, clerk. Daniel Denison: his 2d dep., and bill of costs. 
John West, Robert Roberts, Rich'd Beale, named in bill of 
costs. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 5 

[19] Depositions of Elder (John) Whipple, Mr. John Ap- 
pleton, Theophihis Wilson, Richard Brabrooke, all of Ipswich. 
Sept. 27, 1659. 

John West of Ipswich, 17 years ago lived at Gen'l-Denison's 
farm. , 

John Gage, aged about 50 names Mr. Wade, John Sechwell, ' 
John Manning. 

Samuel Hall, deposition. 

[20] Samuel Hall, second deposition : names John Gregory, 
Gillicrist Rosse, Phillip Wellsh, Richard Brabrook. 

(12) 

Corp, John Gage of Ipswich, deposition. 

[21] Rich. Brabroock of Ipswich, dcp : had known the farm 
15 years. Jonathan Wade, George Giddings, John Dane, 
Thomas Bishop, Simon Tomson, Daniel Hovey, Thomas Bur- 
nam, deputed by Mr. Symonds to survey the forked tree on the 
bounds, — Sept. 30, 1659. 

John Gage, 2d dep. 

[22] Robert Roberts of Ipswich, aged about 40, dep: 
known the farm several years, and long since employed there 
to make hay, when Mr. Winthrop made use of it, names good- 
man Fellows. 

Jonatlian Wade of Ipswich, dep : names Henry Bennett. 

[23] Fellows, William, of Ipswich, vs. Henry Bennett, 
of Ipswich, for trespass ; taking hay from his land as tenant to 
Rich. Saltingstall. • 

Edward Browne, marshal of Ipswich. 

Bill of costs of Will. Fellows. 

William Fellows of Ipswich, aged about 50, dep: that about 
14 years ago, there being a fence to be made between Mr. Sal- 
tonstall and Mr. Wade, Mr. Saltonstall desired me to go to Mr. 

(13) 

Wade and goodman Gage and desired then to show me the line 
in question, which they did. 
John Gage deposes. 



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6 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

[24] Robert Roberts, dep : aged about 40 ; has known the 
farm in question above 24 years, being employed on same sev- 
eral years ; names Henry Bennett. 

Jonathan Wade, Sr., deposition. 

[25] Samuel Graves, deposition. ., 

John Gage, deposition. 

Daniel Denison, dep:. about 20 years ago when Mr. Dudley 
had the farm, we cut the grass. 

[26] Appletox, Lt. Sam'll, of Ipswich, vs. John Foster, 
trespass ; taking tobacco, contrary to law. 

Thomas Jakob, dej^ : aged 18 ; talking with Jno. Foster, about 
the burning of my unkle's barn, he said it should be a w^arning 
to him as long as he lived. #^ 

Franses Walker, dep : that immediately before my master's 
barn was on lire I saw John Foster smoking his pipe at a stump 
about a rod from corner of the barn where the fire caught. 

Lt. Sam'll Appleton deposes. 

DowELL, Robert, of Ipswich, dep : in case of Thomas Bishop 
vs. John Appleford, for debt. 

[27] TuTTLE, Symon, of Ipswich, vs. John Haseltine, for 
witholding a mare colt of his. Edward Browne, marshal. 

Tho. Lowthropp, dep : said mare colt was once his and went 
astray, Goodman Gould, named. Sept. 26, 1659. 

Sarah Martine, aged 26, dep : saith I heard John Tuttle of 

(H) 
Ipswich, my mother and my father say that the gray mare that 
was kept at the barn of John Tuttle of Lynn, my cousin, at 
Rumney Marsh was Symond Tuttle his mare, and was given 
him when a foal. Thomas Burnam, my brother, keeping her 
since my mother went to England. 13:4: 1659. 

Symon Tuttell his bill of costs. Thomas Giddings, Thomas 
Grifing named in said bill. 

[28] Robert Smith, aged 33, dep : that living with Mrs. 
(Joanna) Tuttle, Symon Tuttle' s mother, about 8 or 9 years 
ago, heard Mrs. T. say that said colt which was then in Mrs. 
T's keeping, came of that stray mare, carried away by Lt. 
(I'hos.) Lawtroop. 



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- ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 7 

John Tuttle, of Lynn, aged about 33, dep. John .Tuttle, his 
uncle, in En^. , and Thomas Burnam, of Ipswich, named. 
Thomas ISIarshall, of I^ynn, commissioner, 

John Giddings, of Ipswich, aged 21, names Mr. Marting, his 
uncle, Mrs. Tuttle his grandmother, Thomas Bornum, his uncle. 
Samuel Symond, magistrate. 

Thomas Giddings, aged 23, dep: grandmother Tuttle went 
to England. Uncle Jno. Tuttle, Aunt Hannah. Robert Lord, 
clerk. 

[29] Johanah Grene, aged 59, dep : that when Mrs. Tuttle, 
(my sister) dwelt in Boston, the same year she went to England, 
she said she would go to Ips\vich, and T asked her if she would 
b}' boat or ride. She said she would ride on her son Symon's 
mare and that said mare was at John Tuttle's of Lynn, her 

(15) 

cousin, at Rumlie Marsh. Richard Russell, magistrate. 

Edward Hecock, of Lynn, aged 20, dep. John Tuttle, of 
Lynn, his master, Thomas Burnum of Ipswich, named. John 
Tuttle of Lynn, Burnum' s brother. Thomas Marshall, com- 
missioner. 

-V Humpry Grifing of Ipswich, aged 53, dep : his mistress Tut- 
tle went to Ireland. 

Mary Bornom of Ipswich, wife of Thomas, aged 35, dep : 
that the horse mentioned in letter my mother sent in answer to 
my husband when she w^as ready to go out of the country, she 
called the old mare and her colt part of the estate. Sept. 29, 
1659. 

[30] Joanna Tuttle, of Carrickfergus, Ireland, her letter to 
son* and daughter Giding, of Ipswich, dated Carrickfergus, (Ire- 
land), Apr. 6, 1657, ^^^^ ^^^^ husband was dead and she left 
destitute in a strange land, by reason of her son Symon keeping 
back the returns from Barbadoes : her husband died Dec. 30, 
1656, from grief that his son Symon had appropriated to him- 
self, what belonged to his father. He never v/as sick till the 
day before he died, and from a dangerous disease in the stomach : 
talk with Jewett, of Ipswich, about that I left with him 

* son George. . / 



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8 X ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

and you. I have not heard for 3 years what he hath done. * * * 
My husband has left Komcthinor in his will to Symon Tuttle and 
John Lawrence. Look to my house in Ipswich, that it be not 
ruined. It may be I will see New England again. Hannah 
Tuttle of Ireland, her dau., is to be married soon to a good hus- 
band that loves her well ; and he a handsome man. I sent Jane 
.a small token by Mr. Weber, that went from [ — ] to Jamaica, 
thence to N. E. Like Ireland very well ; had no frost or snow 
this" winter, but very temperate weather which agrees with me 
well. 

[31] Joanna Tuttle of Carrickfergus, Ireland, letter to her 
daughter Jane Gidding of Ipswich, dated Oct. 3, 1656. Had 
written Feb. before. Mr. Corbet of Ipswich, named. I live 
under a very honest man where I enjoy the ordinances of God, 
as in N. E. I hear Richard Jewett hath paid no rent. Thomas 
Burnum named. Her son Symon Tuttle deals very hard with 
his father. He lies at Barbadoes and sends no returns and 

(16) , « : , ■ : 

spends all. I think he John intends to undo their father. Jane, 
you have many sons; God bless them. Inventory on back of 
letter. 

[32] UsELTON, Francis, of Wenham, vs. John Godfrey of 
Ipswich, non-performance of work, for which he had received 
part pay. Hillyard Veren of Salem, Justice. Samuel Orchard, 
of Salem, Marshall; 29 : 4 : 1659. 

Isaak Ong, of Ipswich, dep : he met with said Godfrey at 
goodman Perlly's when he came out of Ipswedg. Said Ong 
was warned out of Ipswich, Sept., 1663. 

John Howe, dep : said Godfrey bargained to work from April 
20 last (1659), to Michaelmas at 8s per week and had rec'd £4 
in consideration of his labor. 

Blacke, Daniel, Baker, John, both of Ipswich, Hale, 
Thomas, Sr., of Salem, vs. Joseph Muzzy, for debt of 10 bush- 
els wheat to be delivered to John Webb of Boston. Anthony 
Somerby of Newbury, Justice. 

John Knight of Newbury, dep: names Steven Swett of 
Newbury, John Webb of Boston. 






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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 9 

Henry Jaques and John Halle, of Newbury, deps : 27: 7: 
1659. 

Anthony Morse, Sr., Constable. 

Walter Price of Salem, aged about 46, deposition. 

Theodor Price, aged about 16, that Sept. 24, 16:59, Joseph 
Muzzy of Newbury, and Sargent Hale of Salem, were at my 
father's house last. 

[34] Apphia Hale, of Salem, aged about 17, deposition. 

Wm. Hathorne, of Salem, Magistrate. 

Mathew Moors, of Newbury, dep : hired by Jos. Muzzy, May 
3d, v.'ith Abraham Waker, to go to Plum Isl. to fetch some cat- 
tle for goodman Hale of Salem, if he could find them, etc. 
27 : 7 : 1659. 

John Knight of Newbury, dep : last of March Mr. Muzzy 
desired me to go to Boston and sec if John Webb of Boston, 
had rec'd the 10 bushels of wheat sent by goodman Hale, Said 
he had. 

[35] Hale, Thomas, of Salem, vs. Joseph Muzzy, of New- 
bury, for debt. 

Joseph Muzzy stands bound to Thomas Hale of Salem, in 
£28 : I OS, in a mare now in the woods to be delivered to Thomas 
Hale, Jr., of Newbury, and the remainder to be paid in )oung 
cattle. Wa. Price, Theodore Price, witnesses. 

[36] John Hale of Newbur}^ dep : rec'd a note from 
Thomas Hale of Salem, his father, to tell Muzzey he should not 
come to Salem. 

Henry Jaquis of Newbui)', dep : to the same. 

Matthew Moores, William Neph (Neff), depositions. 

[37] Knight, Alexander, of Ipswich, vs. Thomas Rowell 
and Robert Collings, breach of covenant. Articles of agree- 

(18) 

ment dated iS Feb., 1656. Richard Kimball, John Gage, Mr. 
Payne, named in articles of agreement. Robert Lord, William 
Norton, witnesses. Feb. 19, 1656. 



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[38] Griffin, Humphrey, of Ipswich, presented; about 
some barle3^ 

Robert Payne, of Ipswich, dep : that Griffin came to his house 
and told him he had been with Mr. John Appleton and he had 
a bill in his pocket for the barley. 

Lt. John Appleton, aged about 36,, deposition. 

Nathan' 1 Rogers, aged about 24, deposition. 25 : 9 : 1659. 

Salem, 8 mo., 1659. 

Hathorxe, Wm., of Salem, his return of fines :3 : 8 : 1659, 
as follows : — 

Smith, James, of Marblehead, not present, when called; war- 
rant to be issued. 

Rowland, Rich'd, fined for sleeping in church. 

Gray, Thomas, fined for profanity. 

Codner, John, fined. 

Charles, Will, fined. 

Codner, Christopher, fined for striking Richard Read with his 
hand, and to pay 12s to Erasmus James. 

Elias White and William Wood, for striking each other in the 
ferry boat. 

Thomas Pitman, of Marblehead, Constable, allowed 2S for his 
attendance and to be paid by the delinquents. 

(•9) 

[40] Browne, William, of Gloucester, vs. Richard Waite, 
of Boston, for not taking sufiicient security for the appearance 
of Thomas Butts, of Boston, at Salem Court last Tuesday in 
Nov., 165S. Jonath. Negus, of Boston, Justice. Simon Lyndle, 
of Boston, Constable. 

Wayte, Richard, of Boston, Marshal, his petition to Court. 
Major Atherton named as sent to Hampton by General Court on 
county's occasion. 

[41] Brown, W^illiam, of Gloucester, vs. Thomas Butts, of 
Boston, for debt. 4:9* 1658. George Dobson, of Boston, 
surety for Butts. 

[42] Blaney, John, of Lynn, vs. Joseph Rock, of Boston, 
debt on two hogsheads tobacco. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. ii 

[43] J^^' Hathorne, of Lynn, aged about 38, dep. 

Joseph Rock, of Boston, dep : that withni nine years had 
several times sold John Blanch, of Lynn, goods on his own 
account. 

Hathorne, Maj. \Vm., of Salem, attorney to John Bex & 
Co., of London, vs. Benjamin Gillam, of Boston, for debt. 29: 
9: 1659. 

(20) 

Salem, 9 mo., 1659. 

[44] Fuller, John, of Ipswich, vs. Sargent Rich. Jacob, 
trespass by cattle in his corn. 24: 9: 1659. Edward Brown, 
Marshal. 

General Court, copy of their order . to towns concerning 
fences. 

John Andrews, John Chote, Samuel Ingles, all of Ipswich, 
chosen to appraise damages, and their depositions. Daniel 
Denison, Magistrate. 

[45] Robert Kinsman, John Low, Thomas Bishop, Thomas 
Low, all of Ipswich, chosen to view fence of John Fuller. 

Thomas Bishop, dep : that a man might stand over it with 
both feet on the ground each side. 

John Fuller, of Ipswich, bill of costs. 

[46] Corp. John Andrews, of Ipswich, aged about 45, 
deposition. 

Daniel Hovey, aged about 17 or 18, dep : helped Fuller 3 or 
4 days in planting time. . 

John Chote, deposition. 

John Dilly (Dillow?), deposition. Nov. 29, 1659. Samuel 
Symonds, Magistrate. 

James Younglove, herdsman, deposition. 

Nathaniel Emerson, aged 28, deposition. Daniel Denison, / 
Magistrate. 

[47] J<^'^^^ Andrews, aged about 31, dep : desired by Fuller 
to appraise damages to corne. 

Samuel Fuller, aged between 14 and 15, sent by his father to 
get Jacobs to call him to prize damages. 



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12 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

(21) 

[48] John Chote, dep : Nov. 28, 1659. One morning saw 
22 head of cattle in Fuller's corn. Went to drive them out ; 
most of them jumped over as sufficient -a fence I ever saw : 
thought them all to be Sergt. Jacob's cattle. 

Samuel Ingalls, deposition; names John Andrews, Sr., son 
of Serg't Jacob, John Fuller. ^ 

[49] UsELTON, Francis, of VVenham, vs, John Godfrye, of 
Ipswich, debt, and his bill of costs. 

Armitage, Joseph, of Lynn, vs. John Buckman, of Boston, . 
debt of JC5, he promised to pay him in behalf of William But- 
ler. Jonath. Negus, of Boston, Justice. Henry Rhodes, of 
Lynn, Constable. Joseph Armitage, bill of costs. 

Jno. Blaney, aged 29, deposition. 

Richard IMore, deposition. 

William Edmunds, aged about 42, dep: went with William 
Butler, of Boston, to Jos. Armitage, and they thought Butler was 
JE6 in Armitage's debt. Robert Bridges, named. 

Armitage, Joseph, of Lynn, vs. Increase Newell, as Execu- 
tor or Administrator to William Butler, dec'd, of Boston, for 
furnishing frame of a house, etc., due. 

(22) 

[50] LowTHROP, Capt. Thos., of Salem, 1^5. John Norman, 
of IManchester and Marblehead, for not finishing a house accord- 
ing to agreement. Samuel Archard, of Salem, Marshal. 

Edward Weeler, aged 34, and John Becket, aged 32, deps : 
being at house of Lt. Lowthrop in March last, heard Norman 
promise to finish the house that was appointed for Mr. (Jer'h) 
Hubbard, of Gloucester, to live in. 

Thomas Chubb and Zacarias Herrick, of Beverly, William 
Seargant, of Gloucester, appointed to view the work done to 
house built by Norman for the minister on Cape Ann side. 

[51] Norman, John, of Manchester, his request of the 
Court. Norman, John, of Manchester, Lothrop, Thos., of 
Salem, and Patch, James, of Ipswich, their agreement in which 
Norman is to build them a house 38 feet long, 17 feet wide, 1 1 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 13 

feet stud, 3 chimnies, two below and i in the chambers: porch 
8 feet square ; 4 windows below and 4 above, and is to bring up 
the frame to the ferry at his own charge. To be paid £45, in 
corn and cattle ; half at or before the house is raised and the 
other at wheat harvest. 

[52] JoANES, Thomas, of Ipswich, vs. Francis Uselton, of 
Wenham, debt. (3 papers.) 

Preston, Rogger, of Ipswich, vs. Will Cogswell, non per- 
formance of agreement in building a fence. John Procttor, Sr., 
John Choot, John Knoulton, Thomas Varny, chosen to inspect 
the work. Nov. 25, 1659. 

James Colburn, of Ipswich, dep : servant to Mr. Cogswell. 

(23) ■ 

Goodman Andias (Andrews), of Ipswich, named in deposition. 
Samuel Symonds, ^lagistrate. 26 : 9 : 1659. 

John Andrews, aged about 40, dep. Daniel Denison, Magis- 
trate . 

John Chote, of Ipswich, dep : about hiring a farm of Cogs- 
well. Hillyard Veren, of Salem, Clerk. 

William Whitred, of Ipswich, dep. 

'[55] Writs not entered, Nov., 1659. 

Uselton, Francis, of Wenham, vs. John Todd, of Rowley, 
debt to be paid to Mr. Edmund Batter, of Salem. John Red- 
iagton, Justice. 22:9: 1659. 

( To be continued.) 



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JOINER— nOORE—PRYOR QUERIES. 



Salmon Joiner was born at Royalton, Vt., Sept. 26, 1777 and married Mary 
Moore about 1802. He was the son of William and Paulina (Tuller) Joiner. 
Can any one give me the dates of birth, marriage, and death of William Joiner 
and Paulina Tuller and the names of their parents ? 

I find a Salmon Joiner baptized at Great Barrington, Mass., June 19, 1782, 
son of Robert and Hannah Joiner. As it is so uncommon a combination of 
names, it seemed as if the two Salmon Joiners, so nearly of an age, must be 
related. 

There was a Robert Joiner, of Sheffield, Mass., who married, March 3, 1757, 
Lucy Loomis, of Windsor, Conn. 

Edward Joiner, who was in Sudbury, Mass., as early as 1726, died about 
1753. ^^^^ ^^'^^^ °^ June 13, 1743, mentions wife Elizabeth late deceased, my 
son Edward Joyner, my youngesL son William Joyner, my three daughters 
Elizabeth Lewis, and Susanna Raglev, and Margaret Joyner, my youngest 
daughter Margaret Hall. No other Joiner wills appear in Middlesex Co. 
records. The only deed is that by which Edward Joyner bought 26 acres of land 
in Sudbury, Feb. 10, 1725-6. 

The son William married Hannah Bowker at Sudbury, March 18, 1745, and 
he and his brother-in-law, Tristram Cheney, removed to Ashburnham, Mass., 
where he was an active and influential citizen, 1763-69. Cheney removed to 
Vermont before 1804, and died at Danville, Vt. William Joiner may have gone 
there with him and may have been father of the William who married Paulina 
Tuller, or perhaps the same William may have married Paulina as his second wife. 

Were these Joiners decendants of Jessope Joyner, who was passenger in 
1635 to this country from Weymouth, Eng., aged 22 ? Are the Joyners of 
North Carolina (one of whom married a daughter of Benjamin May, Signer of 
the Declaration of Independence from North Carolina) of New England descent ? 

I should be glad to learn the date of marriage of the above Mary Moore 
to Salmon Joiner. 



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JOINER— MOORE— PRYOR QUERIES. 15' 

Mai-y Moore was born Jan. 10, 1783, daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Whiting) Moore who settled in Chelsea, Vt., and granddaughter of Thomas 
Moore, Sr., who married Mary Hamlin at East Bridgewater in 1746. 

Can any one give me the descent of Theodosius Moore the father of Thomas 
Moore, Sr.? He married Sarah Pryor in 1725. 

Also the date of birth of the above Mary Hamlin (she died Jan. 10, 1795, 
at either Royalton or Chelsea, Vt.) and her descent. 

I should like the dates of birth and death of the above Sarah Pryor. She 
married in 1738 (?), Josiah Haywood. She was daughter of John and Bethiah 
(Allen) Pryor. Can any one give the dates of birth, marriage, and death of her 
parents ? Bethiah was daughter of Dea. Samuel and Sarah (Partridge) Allen, 
and was born about 1669. 

John Pryor was son of Joseph Pryor, who died in Duxbury in 1692. I 
should also be glad of dates of birth and marriage of Joseph Pryor and the names 
of his wife and of his mother, wife of tlie Thomas Pryor of Scituate, who died 
June, 1639. C. D. L. 



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THE EARLIEST RECORDS OF ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH, GREAT BARRINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

By L. Hasbrouck von Sahler. 

(^Continued from the December number^ 



Oct. I. George and Wm., sons of John Cambell and Ablgal. 
Dec. 24. Lecta, of Rice Hall and Lorania. 

1776. Mar. 24. Abner, of Daniel Wilson and Sarah. 
June 16. Elizabeth, of Benj'n Bankson and Judah. 

177S. Jan. II. Thomas, of Thomas Rockwell and Ruth. 

1750. May I. Miles, Eunice, ch. of Miles Hall and Abigal. 
Jared, of Thos. McGraw and Ann. 

Abigal, of Rebecca Dunbar. . 

1751. Feb. S. Married, Samuel Phipps and Sarah Merwin. 
Feb. iS. Elizabeth, of James Barber and Tabatha. 
Eunice, of Thomas Rockwell and Ruth. 

Solomon Hill, of Truman Skiel and Chloe. 

June 10. Jed, of George Dudley and Martha. 

June 28. Buried, Mrs. Whitlock, wf. of Mr. John Whitlock. 

Aug. 5. Clarissa, of Elisha Martindale and Hannah. 

Nov. 25. Moses, of Thos. McGraw and Ann. > 

^7^3- J^^y ^3- J<^^^ ^^ Zodot Griswold and Susannah. 

Sarah, of Sam' 11 Phips and Sarah. 

Sept. 14. Berent, of Gose and Fitie. 

1784. Jan. 4. John Whitlock, of James Keeler and Abigal. 
Feb. 29. Mary, wf. of Francis Summer. 
George and Gate, ch. of the above. - 

1790. Aug. 2. Jonathan, William, John Whitlock, Betsa, 
ch. of Dr. Thaddeus Thomson and Betsa. 

1 791. Dec. 19. Harriet, of Thaddeus Thomson and Elizabeth. 
1793. Apr. 29. Samuel, Josiah, sons of Sam' 11 Qiiincy and 



Elizabeth. 



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RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. if 

Lke (Hoplands). 
1781. July 4. Buried, John Barber. 

1784. Oct. 19. Sally, of John Freese and Desire. 

1785. Feb. 22. Isaac, of Robert Hcrron and Hannah. 
Buried Isaac, sn. of Matthew Vandensen and Elizabeth, aged 8 

years and 28 days. 

1786. Nov. 4. Sumner, of Rachel King. 

1788. June 16. Buried Hannah, vvf. of Robert Herron. 
Hannah, dr. of the above. 

1790. Feb. 15. Lov/rence, of Jeremiah Wormer and Gesee. 
July 31. Esther, Stephen, Abigal, Rhoda, ch. of Jared Brad- 
ley and Charity. 

1792. July 16. Josiah, Sam'll, Polly, ch. of Ashbel Lee and 
Sarah. 



Lanesboro. 

1773. July 18. Stephan Todd, of John Beach and Mary. 
Lucy, of Benj'n Farnum and Hannah. 
Aug. 8. Eunice, of Lewis Hubbel and Sarah. 
Sept. 5. Daniel and Henry, sns. of Abel Garlick and Cath- 
erine. 
Phebe, of Abel Sherman and Lucy. 
Esther, of Asa Barnes and Lois. 
Nov. 7. Ely, of Ezra Piatt and Naomi. 
Esther, of Matthew Johnston and Sybel. 
Jacob, of Isaac Hall and Rachel. 

1774- Mar. 20. Esther, of Jacob Bacon and Ruth. 

Esther, of Gilbert Everts and Rebecca. 

Apr. 17. Elizabeth, of Seth Garlick and Elizabeth. 



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- i8 RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Hannah, of Abel Garlick and Catherine. 
i Apr. i8. At a Vestry Meetino^ chose Ashbel Beach, clerk, Wm. 

^ Bradley, Elijah Powel, church- wardens ; Obed Edson, Chor- 

i ister. 

\ May 15. Jonathan, of Timo. Lion and Miriam. 

! Esther, of Tames Peters and Sarah. 

\ ' Aug. 7. Kenturah, of Obed Edson and Prudence. 

j Sep. 4. Rebecca, of Joshua Lobdell and Sarah. 

I Rhoda, of Elijah Powel and Mary. 

] Curtis, of Dependance Man and Phebe. 

Paniel, Eunice, Chloe, Reuame, ch. of John Wood and Eunice. 
{ Nov. 30. Titus, of Asabel Beach and Keziah. 



1775. Married, John Powel, Jr., and Lois Curtis. 
Jan. 22. Rhodah, of Abiel Piatt and Rhodah. 

Feb. 26. Joseph Hayley, of Joseph Hall and Dorcas. 

Molly, of Sam'll Steward and Lydia. 

John, of John Beach and ]\Jary. 

Wm. Stiles and his wf. Anne. 

Apr. 23. Solomon, of Azoe Curtis and Margery. 

Seth, of David Wilier and Hepsaba. 

Apr. 24. At a Vestry Meeting chose Asabel Beach, clerk; 

Wm. Bradley, Ezra Piatt, church-wardens; Obed Edson, 

choruster. 
^ay 21. Statira, of Jonah Frisbey and Elisabeth. 
Jair, Desire, ch. of Wm. Stiles and Anna. 
Bette, of Abel Adams and Lucrecia. 
Asahel, of Lewis Hubbel and Sarah. 
Jonathan, of Simeon Gennings and Elisabeth. 
Sep. ly. Anne, of William Bradley and Lois. 
Mela, of Dan' 11 Meriman and Damaras. 
Oct. 15. Jose, of Darius Pain and Loraina. 
Oct. 16. Married, Ephraham Bradley and Hannah Cornish. 
Nov. 12. Married, Peter Burr Curtis and Phebe Sherman. 

1776. Feb. 4. Richard, of Richard Squire and Mary. 
Mar. 10. Isaac, of Isaac Hall and Rachael. 

June 23. Elisabeth, of Simeon Gennings and Elisabeth. 



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RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 19 

Buried, Asahel, ch. of Asahel Beach and Keziah, aged 4 years 

8 months and 10 days. 
Oliver, of Ezra Piatt and Naomi, aged about 5 years. 
July 29. Stephen Fisk, of Obed Edson and Prudence. 

*777* J^"* ^^* Lucy, of Seth Garlick and Elisabeth. 
Esther, of Jon'th Fulford and Thankful. 
Dec. 28. Bailey, of Azoe Curtise and Margery. 
Dec. 29. Zibe, of Thos. Rowley and Lois. 

1779. Emlen, of Abel Garlick and Catlierine. 

Mary, of Burr Curtis and Phebe. 

Sereno, Moses Swift, sns. of Job Gideons and Plannah. 

June 13. James Cable, an adult. 

Hannah, Lois, Lucy, of James Ciible and Hannah. 

Mercy, Dorcas, of Joseph Hall and Dorcas. 

Eleozar, Reuben, of Elezar Sprague and Sarah. 

Elizabeth, of James Lobdell and Mary, ^^ — 

Olive, of Obed Edson and Prudence. 

Asa, Archabel, of Jonah P'risbe and Elisabeth. 

July II. Seth, of Seth Garlick and Elisabeth. 

Hannah, Labon, Bingham, sns. of Joshua Lassell and Hannah. 

Jesse, Dent, Wm. Hodgkinson, sns. of Sam* 11 Harrison and 

Elisabeth. 
Joseph, of Asa Barnes and Lois. 
Aug. 15. Caroline, of Jacob Goff and Mehitabel. 
Tyler, of Uri Bradley and Sarah. 
Elisabeth, of James Barber and Tabatha. 
Sarah, of William Stokes and Mary. 
Sep. 5. Alven, of Jacob Goff and Mehitabel. 
James, of James Cable and Hannah. 
Oct. 3. Married, Stephan Morehouse and Anne Stiles. 
Patience, Peter, William, ch. of Peter Mallery and Lucy. 
Nov. 30. Peter, of Burr Curtis and Phebe. 

17S0. Jan. 5. Richard, of Reuben Garlick and Lucy. 
Jan. 8. Married, John Koffy and Mary Powell. 
Apr. 2. Lucy, of James Rowe and Sarah. 



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20 RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 

Married, Richard Davison and Elisabeth Beach. 

Apr, 30. James, Elisabeth, ch. of Robert Livingston and 

Mary. 
May 28. Elisabeth, of Seth Garlick and Elisabeth. 
June 25. Lorane, of Daniel Johnson and Lois. 
Sep. 17. Joseph Gifford, an adult. 
George Baker, an adult. 
Jehannah, Ammon, Enoch, Lura, ch. of George Baker and 

Anne. 
Oct. 15. Hannah, of Obed Edson and Prudence. 
David, of Midian Oles and Molly. 

1 781. Feb. 14. Thomas, of Wm. Stokes and Policy. 
May 27. Polly, of Thomas Edson and Mary. 
Electa, of Burr Curtis and Phebe. 

June 24. Lucy, of George Baker and Ann. 

Elisabeth, of Joseph Hall and Dorcas. .. .' 

July 22. Elisabeth, of James Cable and Hannah. 

Oct. II. Married, John Sherman and Louis Bradley. . 

1782. Apr. 7. Henry, of Reuben Garlick and Lucy.' 
May 5. Hannah, of Benjamin Farnum and Olive. 
June 9. John, of Josiah Woodward and Abigal. 
July 7. Ely, of Seth Garlick and Elisabeth. 

Aug. 4. Elisabeth, of William Stokes and Mary. 
Dec. 29. Eunice, of Burr Curtis and Phebe. 

1783. Apr. 27. Emlen, of James Cable and Hannah. 
May 25. Lois, wf. of Ezra Piatt. 

Ame, of Asahel Bradley and Hurdah. 

June 29. Wyllis, of Obed Edson, Jr., and Prudence. 

Sarah, of Job Sherman and Lois. 

Phebe, of Jesse Hitchcock and Eunice. 

Anne, of George Baker and Anne. 

June 27. Justus, of Joseph Hall and Dorcas. 

Lucy, Lobdel, ch. of Titus Wood and Susanna. 

Aug. 31. Billy, of Thomas Edson and Mary. 

Betsa, of Richard Davison and Elisabeth. 



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RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 21 

Timothy, of Mercy (Bunnell ?) 

Oct. 26. David, of Josiah Woodward and Abigal. 

1784. Nov. 15. Married, Peter Garllck and Anner Tyrril. 
June 20. Burr, of P. Burr Curtis and Phebe. 

Aug. 15. Ezra, of Ezra Piatt and Lois. 
Sept. 19. Ruth, of George Baker and Anne. 
Oct. 27. Buried, Ruth, \vf. of Jacob Bacon. 
Dec. 12. Benjamin, of Benj'n Farnum and Olive. 
John McVien, sn. of Mary Coffee. 

1785. Feb. 6. Married, Jacob Bacon and Lois Parker. 
Mar. 6. John Jordan, an adult. 

Tully Church, of Joseph Jervis and Abio^al. . , 

Apr. 2. Lucy Farnum, of Benj'n Farnum. ! 

May I. Asahel Beach, of Richard Davison and Elisabeth. 

Sept. 18. Moses, of Midean Old and Molly. 

Horace, of Joseph Jervis and Abigal. 

Sarah, of Josiah Woodard and Abigal. 

Lucy, of Obed Edson, Jr., and Prudence. ■. 

Seymour, of Job Sherman and Lois. 

Oct. 16. Daniel, of John Beers and Esther. 

Dec. II. William, of Uri Bradley and Sarah. 

1786. Jan. 8. Ivlercy, wf. of Mr. Baker, aged 70. 
Mar. 15. Married, Ezra Piatt and Margaret Bunnell. 
Apr. 9. Charles, of Esther Beach, now Hewit. 
Billy Jervia, of Thos. Edson and Mary. 

June 4. Almon, of P. Burr Curtis and Phebe. 

Aug. 27. Lois, of Ezra Piatt and Margret. 

Wm., of John Tankard Moss and Mercy. ■■-- 

Sept. 24. Nancy, of Wm. Fosdick and Urania. • 

Married, Peter Sprague and Polly Farnum. 

Dec. 17. Phebe, of Richard Davidson and Elisabeth. 

1787. Feb. 18. Electa, of Joseph Jervis and Abigal. 
May 27. Eli, of Asahel Bradley and lluldah. 

•July 15. Lucy, of Peter Mallery and Lucy. 



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22 RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Joel, Abel, Orrin, sns. of Jehiel Rice and Pernal. 
Aug. 12. Huldah, of Moses Barnes and Oblsba. 
Sarah, of George Baker and Ann. . 
Levi, of Jesse Hitchcock and Eunice, 
Nov. 29. Cinda, of Jacob Bacon and Lois. 

1788. Feb. 3. Lois, wf. of Jacob Bacon. 
Electa, dr. of the above. 

Chloe, Alma, drs. of Almond Harrison and Jerusha. 

Roxa, of P. Curr Curtis and Phebe. 

Archabald, of Midian Olds and Polly. 

Nov. 2. Married, Chaffee Green and Hannah Cable. 

Nov. 3. Sally Towner, Loissa, Nathan, Richard, Joseph, ch. 

of Joseph Osborn and Eunice. 
Nov. 30. Rufus, of Uri Bradley and Sarah. 
Oliver, of Ezra Piatt and Margret. \ 

Married, Joseph Devereux and Anner Sherman. ' 

Robert Smith and Molly Parker. 
July 20. Lucy, of Peter Sprague and Polly. 
Aug. 17* Electa, of Joseph Jarvis and Abigal. 
Married, Asa Lane and Olive Olds. 
Sept. 14. Asahel, of Thos. Edson and Mary. 
Oct. 12. Daniel Borhonse (Burhans) and Prudence. 
Dec. 7. Penelope Maxum, an adult. 

1789. May 10. Athula, Rebeckah, Ira, Alfred, Rachel, Sam'il, 
Osborn, ch. of Elnalhan Giigory and Huldah. 

Aug. 2. David, of Peter B. Curtis and Phebe. 
Erasmus, of Joseph Osborn and Eunice. 
Aug. 30. Andrew, of Andrew Cornish and Huldah. 
Nov. 22. Laura, of Jesse Hitchcock and Eunice. 

1790. Jan. 17. Prudence Sophia, of Dan' 11 Burhans and 
Prudence. 

Lymon, of Asahel Bradley and Huldah. 

Ezra, of Ezra Piatt and Margaret. 

Nathaniel Milton, Abigal, ch. ofNath'll Torry and Abigal. 

Mar. 14. Oren, of Joseph Jervis and Abigal. 



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RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 23 

Apr. II. Married, Reuben Hicox and Penelope Markham. 
July 4. Married, Preserved Wheeler and Esther Bacon. 
Elisabeth, Anner, Nathan Taylor, John, ch. of John Wood and 

Deborah, 
Clement, of Almon Harrison and Jerusha. 
Aug. I. Anne, of Job Sherman and Lois. 
Abel Sherman, of Jehiel l^ice and Parnel. 
Oct. 24. Polly, of Nehemiah Talcut and Firza. 

1 791. Jan. 16. I^aura, of Jacob Bacon and Lois. 
Mar, 13. Alva, of Joseph Jervis and Abigal. 

July 3. Henry Augustus, of Nath'll B. Torry and Sally. 

Henry, of Peter 13. Curtis and Phebe. 

July 31. Elizur, of Elizur Russell and Ruth. 

Huidah, of Ehiathan Gregory antl liuldah, 

Charele, of Nucl Bostwick and ?vL'imee. 

Aug. 1. Married, Miles Powel and Clarisa Stone. 

Dec, 18. Daniel Edson, of Dan'll Bourjohn and Experience. 

1792. Jan. 17. Dan, of Asahel Bradley and Huidah. 
Hannah, of Joel Bradley and Lucy. 

Hannah, of Peter Sprague and Polly. 

Oct. 7. Rebeckah, of Jehiel Rice and Parnel. 

Electa, of Miriam Olds. 

Nov. 4, Oramel, of Thos. Edson and Mary. 

Asahel, of Job vShcrman and I^ois. 

Harriet, of Joseph Jervis and Abigal. 

Dec. 2. Betsa, of Nehemiah Tolcott and Tirza. 

1793. J^"* 27. David Weed, of John Wood and 

Mar. 31. Sally, of Peter B. Curtis and Phebe. 



WlLLlAMSTOV^N. 

1775' Aug. 22. Zadok, of Zadok Bostwick and'Dorcas. 
William, of William Griger and Margret. 



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1782. Sept. 30. Thankful and Rebeckah, drs. of Sam*il 
Clark and Ame. 

Hannah, Lucy, Isaiah, Mabels, ch., of Isaiah Northrop and 

Mary. 
Olive, of John Smedley and Deliverance. 
Lemuel Scovil, Cynthia, David, ch. of Lemuel Stewart and 

Lydia. 
Lucretia, IMatthew, ch. of Eucebuis Bushenal and Borridill. 
Thos., of Lewis Stebbins and Zeruiah. 
Rebeckah, of John Randel and Catherine. 
Irena, of Jolin Newbre and Prudence. 
Elios, Sarah, Boardman, Nabbe, ch. of Nathan Wright and 

Lydia. 
WilHam, Ely Truman, ch. of Justus Wright and Mercy. 
Milts Wright, an adult. 
Hester, James, Miller, ch. of Miles Wright and Silence. 

1783. Sept. 28. Anne Amelia, of Robert Blair and Sarah. 
Abel, of Bennajah Bushnell and Lucy. 

Dotha, of Elias Newbry and Submit. -. • r 

Orasge, of Sam' 11 Weltch and Prudence. 

John Hutchinson, Henry, Jonathan, Zeviah, ch. of Jona'th 

Sherwood and Elisabetli. 
Elisabeth, Mary, Sarah, drs. of Stephan Sherwood and Elisabeth. 
Folly Ann, of Isaiah Northrop and Mary. 
Martha, of Dan'll Johnson and Lois. 
Polly Betsy, of Nehemiah llubbel and Lucretia. 
Geredus, Minerva, and Elisha, ch. of Elisha Camp and Keziah. 



j '7^4* Aug. 16. Mary, Clarissa, Sarah, Anne, drs. of John 

Orton and Sarah. 
Margaret, Daniel, Hannah, Justin, ch. ' of Daniel Foot and 
Margret. 



Hartwood ('now Washington). 

1774. Jan. 18. Ely, of John Plum and Dorathy. 
Caroline, of Jacob Gofl and Mehetabel. 



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Abigal, Triphena, Christena, drs. of Alpheus Spencer and 
Hepsaba. 



New Ashford. 

1775. Jan. 2. Married, George Sherman and Rachel Baxter. 

Abel, of Jon\h Fulford and Thankful. 

Clemantha, of Jared Tyler and Hannah. 

Aug. 21. Hannah, of Jacob Lyon and Hannah. 

Salmon, of Jared Tyler and Hannah. 

Oct. 15. Married, Eli Mallory and Alsa Youngs, 



Sandisfield. 

1775. Feb. 16. Solomon, of John Hubbard and Hannah. 
Mary, of Nathan Hubbard, Jr., and Lucy. 

1780. May 14. Nathan, Daniel, sns. of Nathan Hubbard and 
Lucy. 

Hannah, of John Hubbard and Hannah. 
Irena, of Thos. Patterson and Irena. 
Justus, of Jesse Warner and Rhoda. 

1 781. Lemuel, of Sam*ll Clark and Molly. 
Wm., of Juddemur Hubbard and Jerusha. 
Elisha, of Sam' 11 Bly and Prudence. 

1782. July II. Hannah, of Jolin Hubbard and Hannah. 
Eunice, of Israel French and Rebecca. 

Married, Nathaniel Hubbard and Rhena Warner. 

1784' Dec. 1. Lydia, of John Hubbard and Hannah. 
Asher, of Juddimmer Hubbard and Jerusha. 
Chester, of Dan'U Webb and Lorania. 



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26 RECORDS OP' SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Nov. 22. Clarissa, of John Hubbard and Hannah. 

1786. Nathan, of Consider Warner and Margret. 

1787. Apr. 18. Nath'U, of Nath'li Hubard, Jr., and Irena. 
Lucy, of Consider Warner and Margret. 

Buried, said Hubbard's wife, Irena. 

1788. Nov. 5. Noah, of Noah Dowd and Mehitabel. 

1789. Oct. 6. Chirissa, of Wm. Bateman and Rachel. 
Eliphalet, of Consider Warner and Margret. 

Joseph Beuel, an adult 

1790. Sept. 15. Francis Dodge, an odult. 

Leva, Mar}', Flavillo, adults, Myrtillo, Daniel, Elisabeth, ch. of 
Daniel Warner and Elisabeth. 

1791. June 29. Elijah, of Obediah Deland and Mary. 
Veranda, William, of Dan'll Warner and Elisabeth. 
Philander, of Wm. Beatman and Rachel. 
Mehitabel, of Noah Doud and Mehitabel. 

John, Mary, Lucy, Juliet, Huldah, ch. of Joseph Buell and 
Lucy. 



Alford. 
1777. J^tt. 27. Christene, of Deodat Ingersoll and Mary 
1782. Aug. 15. Married, John Browne and Lucy Hill. 



Adams. 



1783. Oct. 2. Josiah, Sam'll, Elishn, Mary, ch. of Elias 

Jones and Elisabeth. 
Israel, Daniel, Charles, sns. of Israel Jones and Alithea. 



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RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 27 

TocKONOCK (Taconic) Mountain, now Mount Washington, 

1784. June 14. Betsa, Erastus, Elijah, Dan' 11, Silvester, ch. 

of Dan'll Ball and Hannah. 
Eunice, Joseph, Polley, Ame., ch. of Stephan Sherwood and 

Elisabeth. 



New Marlboro, 

1785. June 16. Jared, of Asher Taylor and Mary. 
Rodorick Hotchkinson, of Dan'll Canfield and 



Augj. 33. Jomes, Bates Hoyt, sns. of Sam'll How and Lydia. 

1790. Sep. 16. Ambious, of Abel Ford and Susanna. 
Polly, of Ezekicl Bradley, Jr., and Polly. 
Chaunsey, of Oliver Wilcox and Ruth. 



PlTTSFIELD. 

1775. Jan. 8. Elias Wheler, of Ephraham Wheler and 

Hepsaba. 
Abraham, Solomon, Phineas, sns. of Phineas Belding and 

Hannah. 

17S9. Sept. 27. Orestes, of Elisha Hard and Mary. 

1790. Feb. 12. Curtis Fairchild, of Elizur Russel and Ruth. 
Apr. i^. Benjamin, Jasper, Dorothy, Rebecca, Aaron, ch. of 
Aaron Wood and Dorothy. ' 



Tyringham. 

1790. Oct. 13. Margret, wf. of Consider Warner. 
John Deland, an adult. 



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RECORDS OF SAINT JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



1792. Oct. 31. Selah, of Noah Dowd and MehittabeL 
Nalh'll, of Henry Nottage and Susannah. 

Nov. 28. Buried Charles, sn. of Price Hall and Lorane. 

1793. Apr. 24. Married, Samuel Webb and Thankful Dowd, 



Bethlehem, now a part of Otis. 
1 791. Nov. I. Dan'll and Jonah Webb, adults. 



( To be continued.) 



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A PARTrAL RECORD OF THE flANSUR FAniLY. 

, By John H. Mansur, of Royersford, Pa. 



For a part of the history of the family of Mansur contained 
in the following pages, I am indebted to the late Hon. Charles 
H. Mansur, of Chillicothe, Mo., who at his own expense in 
1889, prepared and printed a pamphlet, containing what I believe 
to be the first attempt to compile a history of our family and 
preserve some of the traditions relating to early days of the col- 
onies, in which they took part. 

Some of it I have gathered by correspondence with various 
branches of the family, but no one who has not tried it, can have 
any idea of the difficulty there is in getting even the simplest facts. 
Many who could supply this information are dead, and many 
others take no interest whatever in. the matter, and thus, much 
that would be of interest to us of the younger branches, has been 
lost beyond recovery. It is much to be regretted that so little 
attention was paid to these things by our ancestors. If the 
family records had been carefully kept, it would have made 
very interesting reading at the present time, especially when so 
many are endeavoring to trace their descent from pre-Revolution- 
ary sires. 

I have attempted, before it is entirely too late, to gather some 
of this information yet remaining, and put it into permanent 
form, in the hope that some other pen will take up and continue 
the work, until we shall have a complete registry of those who 
bear the honored name of Mansur. 

The connection of the scattered representatives of the name 
with Robert Mansur of Charlestown was accomplished by Mr. 
Eben Putnam of Salem. Mr. Putnam undertook the task, at my 
request, of investigating the traditions in our family regarding 

29 



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io A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

our origin with the result shown hereafter. While contempo- 
rary proofs are wanting that Robert Mansur was our common 
ancestor, such evidences as remain, hidden among scattered and 
voluminous records, point to that fact with such directness as to 
cause doubt to be almost superfluous. 

There is a tradition that the first one to bear the name of Mansur 
in this country, was a French Hugenot who bore the name of 
Monsieur. He was said to have come from the Isle of Jersey 
*and settled in the neighborhood of Boston about the year 1660. 
He was so eccentric in his ways that he was known among his 
neighbors as the " crazy Frenchman." The same tradition 
asserts that he was a person of some means, as he dressed well 
and engaged in no occupation, but is silent as to his family, the 
date of his death, and cvervthino^ else. 

The earliest authentic record brourrht to lig^ht so far, is to be 
found in ^' Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, Mass." by 
Thomas Bel lew Wyman, where it is recorded a certain Robert ■. 
Mansir or Mansur, married Elizabeth Brooks, a w^idow, June 
6, 1670. She is recorded as residing at Thomas Barber's, 
October 31, 1689. She died January 3, 1694. 

In Savage's '' Genealogical Dictionary," Robert Mansur is 
recorded as a householder in 167S, in Charlestown, Mass.* 

Whether this Robert Mansur is identical with the "crazy 
Frenchman " spoken of above, I have no means of knowing. 
Like most traditions this may have had so?ne basis but what 
grain of truth ispresent is unrecognizable amid the massof error. 

The following letter is of interest in this connection: — 

Danvers, Mass., Feb. 26, 1899. 
John H. Mansur, Esq., 

Dear Sir : — With this I enclose a preliminary study of the earlier generations 
of the Mansur family; also a pedigree which I advance in a tentative way. 

It would be very hard to disprove this pedigree, as all the information gathered 
seems to fall in with it. However, it is open to correction. 

If you will take a map of Massachusetts you will see that Maiden and Mcdford 
join. Both practically adjoin Charlestown. Charlestown formerly extended to 
Woburn and bounded Cambridge. 

Roxbury joined Dedham, and Needham was set off from Dedham. Needham 

♦Pamphlet of C. H. Mansur. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 31 

was almost, a neighbor to Cambridge before her limits were curtailed. In 
passing from Boston to Cambridge one had to pass through Roxbury. Andover 
is not far from Medford. 

The early Mansur families all revolve around Charlestown. 

The lack of probate settlements makes this a difficult family to trace. Then, 
too, during those years they appear to have enjoyed little landed property, 
another obstacle. 

The early death of Robert would have caused his sons to be put out as appren- 
tices. Here we have a clew as to the probable scattering of the family. 

I have pretty well exhausted the available records and I fear that little more 
can be obtained. I am in hope that an exhaustive search of Andover records, 
also Lovejoy probate and deeds will yield some more information. 

This is to report progress. Very truly yours, 

(Signed) Eben Putnam. 



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ORIGIN OF THE MANSURS OF NEW ENGLAND. 

The name Mansur is not a corruption of any similar French 
name.* It is derived from the old Norman Mansur, which 
was a Christian name and by the Normans introduced into 
England, but not now frequently met with in England. 

[James Manzer was a passenger to Barbadoes, in the Alex- 
ander, 2 May, 1635. See * 'Drake's Founders of New Eng- 
land." He was aged 27.] 

The earliest mention of the name in New England occurs 
on the Marriage Record of Charlestown, Mass. 



I. Robert Manser married Elizabetli Brooks, 6 June, 1670 

He was living in 1677-S, but was probably dead before i68o 
(Charlestown tithe lists), but there is no settlement of his estate. 

Elizabeth Manser, Sr., and Elizabeth Manser, Jr., ordered to 
be summoned into court ior not appearing at the court upon 
summons of the Charlestown Committee, 7 Oct., 16S4. 

29, 10 mo., 1684, they appear in court and their answer being 
accepted they are dismissed. ( Aliddlesex Cozirt Records,) 



♦ Charlestown was the centre of a settlement of 'many fishermen from the Isle of, 
Jersey. Such were the Blaners, and Sailers, now Blaney, and Salle. It is pos- 
sible that Manser was one of this group. The argument against this view is that 
the "er" has always been sounded, while in the other cases the spelling has 

been changed to agree with the pronunciation. 

32 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 33 

Wyman, in his " Estates," records that the widow Elizabeth 
Manser was to have a chamber at Thomas Barber's, 21 Oct., 
1689. ( Select7ticns' Reco7'ds.) 

Ehzabeth Manser, widow of Robert, died 3 Jan., 1694—5. 
There is no settlement of her estate. 

Children: — 

1. John, born about 1670. 

2. Thomas, born before 1680. 

3. William, born before 1680. 

4. Elizabeth, set. 13 in 1685; m. 3 Dec, 1687, Thomas Pope, a mariner. 

5. Robert, born 15 April, 1674, at Charlestown. Nothing further regarding 

him has been discovered. 






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SECOND GENERATION. 



II. I. John Manser, possibly of Boston, but probably of 
Charlestown. He may have been born about 1670 as he mar- 
ried in 1695. 

Was he a son of Robert Manser? That seems the most prob- 
able theory, but as yet there appears to be no evidence other 
than suitability in age and residence and station in life. There 
is nothing known to conflict \vith this theory. 

John Manser married in Boston, 24 April, 1695, by Rev. 
James Allen, Mary Mirick. He is described as of Charlestown, 
and the bride as of Boston. His name is spelled Monsir. 
Wyman says Mary Mirick had been a servant of Anthony Stod- 
dard in Charlestown. 

No children are recorded to this marriage. Woburn records 
record the marriage of John Mansur to Elizabeth Hinshaw of 
Charlestown, 3 June, 1701. They had the following child- 
ren, born in Charlestown : — 

l-i. Elizabeth, born 28 Jan., 1702-3, bapt. 28 March, 1703. 
1-2. John, born 10 Nov., bapt. II Nov., 1 705. 

There is no settlement of the estates of John or his wife. 
Elizabeth Henshaw was the daughter of Thomas and Hannah 
(Cleveland) Henshaw of Woburn, and was born 30 July, 1678. 



II. 2. Thomas Mansur was of Maiden. Maiden, Charles-; 
town, and Medford, have always had much in common. The mar- 
riage of Thomas Mansur is not of record. His wife was Marv 
-as appears from the birth records of his children. There 
appears little doubt but that he was son of Robert Mansur, and 
perhaps born as earl)- as 1670. 

34 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 35 

The following children appear on Maiden records : — 

2-1. Mary, born 22 Sept., 1 716. 

2-2. Elizabeth, born 18 June, 1718. 

2-3. Hannah, born 14 Oct., 1720. 

2-4. Sarah, born 18 Sept., 1722. 

2-5. Phebe, born 16 Jan., 1724-5. 

2-6. Lydia, born 10 April, 1728 ; probably the Lydia who married William 

Binford in 1754. (See Wyman's "Charlestown's Estates.") 

2-7. John, born 6 Nov., 1730. 

2-8. Martha, born i June, 1734. 

.Mary Mansur of Maiden, married William Barnes of Bos- 
ton, 26 Jan., 1742-3. 

Mary Mansur of Maiden, married John Martin, iS Sept., 

1745- 

''Thomas Mansur and wife Mary, last from Needham," are 
warned from Sudbury, i7i7' They came to Sudbury beginning 
of Feb . , 1 7 1 6-7 . ( Middlesex Court Rec. , page 336. ) 

It was the custom to warn all new comers to town. -This 
prevented responsibility falling on the town or participation in 
town commons, at least in theory. Most desirable people were 
sometimes "warned." Sudbury records contain no reference to 
births, marriages, or deaths of this family, or others of the 
name. 

Needham was set off from Dedham in 171 1. Dedham 
records contain no reference to the name. 

Thomas Mansur of Maiden, is undoubtedly he who was warned 
from Sudbury. On the 16 Dec, 1730, Jonathan Howard, Jr., 
gives to his friend and townsman, Thomas Mansser, a house in 
Maiden. It is still standing on Madison Street, and after Man- 
ser's death was used as the town almhouse. 

In 1756, the town paid a physician's bill for attendance on 
Martha Mansur, in the time of her sickness. 

Thomas Mansur was a member of the church in 1772. 

He was sexton (chosen in town meeting), 1733-4, 1738-9, 
1739-40, and thereafter to 21 June, 1775. He probably died 
between iSIarch, 1775 and June, 1775. In 1763, he was one 
of the town's poor. (Cory's Maiden.) 



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36 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

II. 3. William Mansur of Medford and of Roxbury. 
He married at Cambridge, 2 Feb-, 1 714-5, Lydia, daughter of 
Gershom and Sarah (Holden) Swan, of Cambridge, born 10 
Nov., 1689. 

He was of Medford. William Mansur, wife, and family were 
warned from ISIedford, 8 Oct., 1723, (Middlesex court rec.) 

Children born in Medford: — 

3-1. Lydia, born 10 April, 1716; died there 20 Aug. 171 7. 

The following adults were baptised in the Roxbur)' church : — 
3-2. Sarah" Manser, bapt. 16 March, 1740. 
Lydia Manser, bapt. 30 March, 1740. 
3-3. Susanna Manser, bapt. 30 March, 1740. 
3-4. Mary Manser, bapt. 21 Nov., 1747. 
Lydia Manser was married at Boston, i Dec, 1741, to Robert Cain. 

Wyman savb he was a brickmaker. He removed to Roxbury. 

In 17631 William INIanser sold to Robert Cain land in Rox- 
bury toward Dedham, which was apparently the whole or part 
of a lot he had bought in 1731 from Abraham Woodward and 
wife. ( Suffolk Deeds). ' 

William Mansor was a corporal in the company of Capt. 
William Drummond Dummer and was stationed at the Castle 
(Boston Harbor) 26 weeks in 1725: also 1726 and 1727. 
(Mass. Archives). 

17 Dec, 1720, William Mansier of Boston, soldier,- a- //a'.s- 
William Mansier belonging to the Castle William vs. Nathaniel 
Spear of Braintree, Junior, miller, for debt, reciting that on 8 
Dec, 17271 said Spear gave bond for JC40 which remains unpaid, 
etc (Suffolk Files^ 2402'/). 



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THIRD GENERATION. 

III. 2-7. John Mansur, son of Thomas, erroneously 
described by Wyman as son of John, born in Maiden, 6 Nov., 
1730, was a soldier in lyS^? 7? ^' 9* -^^^ service is given in 
the Mass. Archives, as follows : — . "^ 

Impressed out of the ist. Middlesex Regiment for expedition 
against Crown Point, according to order of 15 April, 1756, on 
roll dated 27 May, 1756, at Cambridge, Col. William Brattle, 
Vol. g4^ p. 224. 

It appears he served 31 weeks in 1756' Vol. gj^ p. igo. 

On another roll he is described as of Maiden, aged 25, mat- 
ross in Col. Gridley's regiment, mustered 8 May, 1756. Vol, 
g4^ p. 202. .- - . • • ■ 

He served in 1757, as we learn from a note to roll for 1758, 
in which he is described as a private and of Charlestown, and as 
a deserter. Vol. g6^ p. 6j. (The desertion was probablv tech- 
nical rather than actual.) 

It also appears he served seven months 1758. Vol. pd, p. 

337- 

Wyman says that Sarah Manser and child were notified 

(warned) from Charlestown, 1757* This would dovetail in with 

John's service in the army. Middlesex Court records tell us that 

John Manser, wife, and child were warned from Charlestown, 

12 Dec, 1759, (not 1757), having been there six months and 

twelve days, and last from Maiden. John Manser, wife, and 

John, Jr., were in the census of 1789, at Charlestown. Wyman 



* Wc propose to describe this branch of the family before taking up the more 
important branch descended from John Mansur. 

37 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 



says that John, and his son John, were drowned in the Sand 
Cove in the narrows, 35 May, i790« 

Cory states that John Mansur was a private in 6th battalion, 
Capt. Robert Allen, Col. Alden's regiment, having enlisted 
for three years in 1777. lie also adds the following information 
concerning his French War sei^vice. Drafted 15 April, 1756. 
Served at Crown Point with Capt. Lord. Was in service till 
December. Petitioned for pay. Was in Capt. Chadwick's 
compan}-^ and taken sick at a place called Half Moon. Served 
in 1758 under Capt. Eben'r. Marrow. 

He was taxed in Charlestown, 1761-73. Was driven to Med- 
ford in 1775, and claimed for loss on account of the British 
destruction of Charlestown. Bought a lot of land in 1777. 

He married 26 July, 1753, at Maiden, Sarah Bradish, born 27 
Feb., 173T-2, daughter of John and Sarah (Sweetser) Bradish 
of Charlestown. 



1 



Children born in Charlestown : — - 

2-7-1. A child born before or in 1757; probably at Maiden. 

2-7-2. Ebenezer, born 6 Jan., 1760. 

2-7-3. Seih, horn 28 Oct., 1 76 1. 

2-7-4. John, born 18 May, 1766. 

2-7-5. Samuel, born II March, 1768. 

2-7-6. William, bapt. 28 June, 1772. 



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TRIBE OF THOMAS. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

IV. 2-7-2. Ebenezer Mansur, son of John, born in 
Cliailestown, 6 Jan., 1760: died 6 Oct., 1806, at Boston. 
Married (23 Nov., 17S1; Elizabeth Brown of Boston. She 
died 31 July, 181 2. Lived in Charlestown. 

CHILDREN: — 

2-7-2-1. Scth, born i July, 1782. 

2-7-2-2. John, born 7 June, 17S4. 

2-7-2-3. Sally, born 19 June, 1786; married James Ayer. 

2-7-2-4. William, born 26 Dec, 1788. 

2-7-2-5. Ebenezer B., born 17 July, 1791; died 12 Dec, 1825; married 25 

Dec, 1816, Mary Rea. 
2-7-2-6. Thomas, born 3J Jan , 1794. 
2-7-2-7. Betsy Brown, born 29 May, 1797. 
2-7-2-8. Polly, born 15 June, 1799. 
2-7-2-9. George Washington, horn 9 May, 1 801. 
2-7-2-10. Robert, born 25 Jan., 1803, 

IV. 2-7-5. Samuel Mansur, son of John, born in 
Charlestown, 11 March, 1768; died — Feb., 1S29, at Charles- 
town. 

He married 3 Jan., 1790, Hepzibah Goodwin, who died 10 
Feb., 1793, 3et. 25; married, second, 2 Dec, 1793, Nancy 
Brown of Boston, who died 14 Jan., 1794, aet. 19; married, 
third, (pub. Oct., 1817) Mary Ann French. She had adminis- 
tration of husband's estate, iS Aug., 1829. Estate $3,500. 

A Mary Mansur died in Charlestown, April, 1S30, at. 40. 

39 



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TRIBE OF JOHN. 



THIRD GENERATION. 

III. 1-2. John Mansur of Methuen, appears to be that 
John born in 1705, son of John, supposed son of Robert. li so, 
- he would have been of age in 1726. He first comes to notice 
in 1729. ^ 

John Mansur of Andover for JC72 N. E. money (i. e,, $235) 
buys of Abel Astin and his wife Sarah of Methuen, forty acres 
in Methuen, bounded on John Guttason, Jr., Thomas Astin, 
James Baker, and John Guttason; deed dated 15 April, 1729; 
i| acknowledged 14 May, 1729; recorded 10 July, 1740. Essex 

Deeds, 79-134- .,,:,-. 

John Mansur of Andover, husbandman, buys of Thomas 
Astin and wife Sarah of Methuen, for £26, land there, being 
20 acres, bounding on Benj. Gage, by Haverhill former line, 
late Eben. Barker, so on Haverhill line and William Gutterson. 
24 May, 1726; ackowledged 27 May, 1729; recorded 10 July, 
1740. Essex Deeds, yg-ij^. 

Examination of Qiiarterly Sessions fails to find any notifica- 
tion of Mansur from any town in Essex as late as 1736. 

John I^Iansur of Methuen, married in Andover 31 Dec, 1732, 
Hannah Lovejoy of the South Parish. A?idover Records, 

It is not clear who Hannah was. The Lovejoys are an old 
{] Andover family. Thomas Astin, or Austin, who sold tlie land 

i' above described, had married in 1714? Sarah, daughter of 

Christopher Lovejoy. • 

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TRIBE OF JOHN. ^ ' 41 

There was a Hannah, daughter of Joseph Lovejoy (by his 
\vife Sarah Pritchard), born on 11 Feb., 1693-4, but she could 
hardly have been the mother of John Mansur's children. 

Tliere is no settlement of the estate of Christopher Lovejoy. 
It has been thought Hannah may have been his daughter. 

John Manser (spelled Mancer on rolls) served in the French 
war. He was of the Train Band of Methuen in 1757. Mass. 
Arc/lives^ g§-2g8. 

John Mancer, Jr., was also of the Train Band.. 

John jNIancer appears on a muster roll sworn to i March, 
'759' ^^ ^^ Lieut. Chandler's company, Col. Osgood's regiment, 
which marched on an alarm to the relief of Fort William Henry, 
Aug., 1757. They marched from Andover 15 Aug., to Wor- 
cester. Dated Andover i March, 1759. Mass. Archives^ gj- 
2g8. 

It is quite possilde that this was the younger John. 

Andover records contain no references to the famil}'^ of John 
Mansur. 

Administration on the estate of John Mansur of Methuen, 
yeoman, was granted to the relict Hannah, 5 Aug., 1776. Sam- 
uel Mansur was a surety. The inventory shows .£55. 

CHILDREN:— 
I-2-1. John. 

1-2-2. William, born i Jan., 1737. 
1-2-4. James, born 7 Sept., 1744. 

1-2-3. Elizabeth, m 28 Sept., 175S, at Methuen, to Samuel Bodwell. 
1-2-5. Samuel, m. 2 May, 1765, at Methuen, to Sarah Varnum of Dracut. 

Mr. Moses Mansur wrote the following account of the origin 
of the family, to his sister Lucinda : — 

"When I was a little boy I was much in my grandmother's part of the house; 
people would come in and talk over old times. I listened. Our great-grandfather 
was born in 1702 and came from Jersey, an island belonging to England, lying 
near the French Coast. He was of French origin, Mansur being French. 

'* I have often heard grandmother, my grandmother, say when she was small 
the men were busy in the summer time at three o'clock in the morning. The 
women would put the saddle-bags on the horse and go off to Haverhill shopping, 
so as to get back before dark. Haverhill was the nearest trading place then, and 
the road was full of stumps, stones, and woods." 






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42 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMiLY. 

Mary (Harris) Mansur and her friends, talking of old times, 
would leave but a more or less confused account in the mind of 
a young lad. It is doubtful if the first John, being not more 
than ten when his father died, knew much about the origin of 
the family. It is quite possible Robert came from Jersey. 
The John of Methuen might easily have become confounded 
with John, son of Robert, his father, in the mind of the youth- 
ful listener. 

He appears to have been a man of prominence in the 
communitv and was what was called a '' tithincr man." 
This curious ofiice is now obsolete, but during its continuance 
it was a very important part of the economy of the New Eng- 
land village, and brouirht the official into very close relations 
with the townspeople. While his duties were connected with 
the church, he was also a town ofllcer, and had many semi- 
secular duties to perform. Each tithing man had several 
neighboring families under his charge, originally ten, as the 
word " tithing" would signify. He enforced the learning of the 
church catechism at home, sometime during the week visited 
the houses to hear the children recite their catechism. 
These families he watched especially on Suncla\s, to see 
whether they all attended church and did not loiter on the way. 
In some Massachusetts towns he was ordered to WiUch on week 
<3ays to~keep "boys and all persons from swimming In the 
water." Truly ten large families, with many bo}s, such as 
were common in New England, must have kept him busy on 
hot Aug^ust days. , * 

He inspected taverns and reported all disorderly persons within, 
forbade the sale of intoxicating liquors to them, had power as a 
constable to arrest any evil-doer, administered the " oath of 
fidelity " to new^ citizens, and warned undesirable visitors to 
leave town. Pie could arrest persons who walked or rode at 
too fast a pace while going to meeting on Sunday, or who made 
needless visits or took unnecessary rides on Sunday, or other- 
wise broke the Sunday laws. Within the meeting house the 
tithing man kept oider by beating out dogs, correcting unruly 
and noisy boys, and waking those v.'ho slept. To accomplish 
this, he sometimes walked up and down the church aisles, car- 



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' TRIBE OF JOHN. 43 

rving a stick which had a knob on one end, and a dangling fox- 
ui!l on the other. It is said that he tapped the boys on the head 
with the knobbed end of tlie stick, and tickled the faces of sleep- 
ing church attendants with the fox-tall. In those days everybody 
old and young, w^as supposed to attend church. If any one was 
absent it was noticed, and if the absence continued three Sun- 
days it was the duty of the tithing man to visit the family and 
ascertain the cause. Some old churches had tithing men until 
the beginning of this century. 

John Mansur lived and died a strict Puritan, and now lies 
buried at Methuen, Mass., beside his son, James Mansur. 

( To be continued.) 



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BAPTISriAL RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH, 
BURLINGTON, VT., 1811-1820. 

Copied by Walter H. Crockett. 



The list of baptisms at the First Church, Burlington, begins 
with September, 1811. In some cases the month only is given, 
the day of the month being omitted from the records. The 
list to the year 1820 is as follov/s : — 

1811. 

Sept. — George, son of Elizabeth Severance ; Amanda, 
daughter of Lyman and Olive King ; Hiram, son of Rhoda 
Ormsby ; Cyrus George, Augustus, and Henry, sons of Joseph 
and Mary Prime. 

Sept. 17. — George, Lucinda Maria, and Charles Stanton, chil- 
dren of Sally Peaslee. 

Oct. 6. — Elizabeth Leavitt, daughter of Rev. D. and Elizabeth 
Haskell. 

Oct. 27. — Mary Ann, Henry Oscar, Adeliza Sabrina, and 
Sally Damon, children of Ann Sacryder. 

1812. 

Jan. 3. — Alma, daughter of Lyman and OHve King. 

May — Martin Alfred, son of Fanny Seymour. 

June 7. — Julia, Orange, and Orville, children of Cephas and 
Matilda Robinson ; Maria Cornelia, daughter of Titus and 
Rachel Kellogg ; Sarah Wilson, Joseph Harmon, and Harriet 
Elvira, children of Oliver Sheldon. 

44 



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BAPTISMAL RECORDS, FIRST CHURCH, BURLINGTON, VT. 45 

'813- 

Nov. 21. — ^William, Richard Lemuel, Alonzo, Albert, Carlos, 
and Harriet Maria, children of Eunice Wainwright. 

1814. 

March 6. — Mary Ann, daughter of Rev. D. and Elizabeth 
Haskel. 

July 10. — George, son of Peter and Hannah Gale. 

July 31. — John Chandler and Stedman Grosvenor, sons of 
Olive Merriam. 

Aug. 7. — Melissa, daughter of Joseph and Mary Prime. 

1815. 

March — Lucia, daughter of Lyman and Olive King. 

Aug. 6. — Henry, Edgar, Jane, and Samuel, children of Eliza 
Hickok. 

Aug. 7. — Frederick Augustus, son of Rufus Crossman ; Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of Elizabeth Severance. 

Oct. 7 — Thomas, son of Samuel Mills. 

1816. 

June 23 — Henry, son of Rev. D. and Elizabeth Haskel. 
August 28. — Anna Maria and John, children of Oliver Shel- 
don. 

1817. 

March 4. — Jane Augusta, daughter of J. W. and Amelia 
Clark; Mary, daughter of Elizabeth Severance. 

May II. — Edward, son of Lyman and Olive King; George, 
son of William J. and Olive Seymour. 

June 29. — William and Lucius, sons of James and Emma 
Bostwick ; Elizabeth Sophia, daughter of Silas Root. 

August I. — Anna Maria, Semanthe, and Mary, daughters of 
Mary Bliss. 



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46 BAPTISMAL RECORDS, FIRST CHURCH, BURLINGTON, VT. 

1818. 

February 5. — Frances, daughter of Eliza Hickok. 

March 4. — Moses, son of Anna CatHn. 

March 26. — Charles Augustus and George Wilcox, sons of 
Newton Hayes. 

July 12. — Cornelia, Marcia, Cornelius, and John, children of 
Cornelius P. Van Ness. 

August — 'James, son of James W. and Amelia Clark. 

September 27. — Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Mills. 

October — David Leavitt, son of Rev. D. and Elizabeth 
Haskel ; Alexander and Henry, sons of Melinda Catlin. 

October 4. — Sally Merrill, Caroline, Mary Ann, Jacob 
Athcrton, Julia Ann, and Adelia iMaria, children of Sally Davis. 

November 1. — George VV'^illiams, son of Harriett Starr. 

November 6. — William and Henry, sons of Rosalinda Cal- 
kins. : :v ■ 

1819. ;■■ '^■\'^' '';'■:■ 0'^'; 

January 17. — Sally Eliza and Nancy Maria, daughters of 
. Sally Seymour. 

July 3. — Charles Lyman and Juliet Eliza, daughters of 
Amanda Harrington. 

November 7. — Charles Webster, son of Charles and Dolly 
Caldwell. 

November 14. — William, son of William and P'anny Sey- 

mour. 

November 21. — Laura Ann, daughter of Elizabeth Severance. 



[Note. — It is the hope of the Editor to gather all marriages, births, 
baptismal, death, and burial records for the State of Vermont, to the year 
1820. The cooperation of town and })arish clerks, the clergy, and other 
interested persons is requested. Records will be printed as fast as received]. 



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WALPOLE, N. H.— RECORD OF BIRTHS. 



Copied by Rev. W. S. Nichols. 

Abigail Bellows, daughter of Benjamin and Mary Bellows, born January 13th, 

1759- 
Theodore Bellows, son of Benjamin and Mary, born August 15th, 1 761. 

Thomas Bellows, son of Benjamin and Mary, born September 17th, 1762. 

Clarissa Leavitt, daughter of Rev. Johnathan and Sarah Leavitt, born Sep- 
tember 26th, 1762. 

Theidosia Kilburn, daughter of John and Content Kilburn, born May loth, 1 763. 

Rawzil Calkin, son of Israel and Sarah Calkin, born October 6th, 1761. 

Bershebrt' French, daughter of John and Olive French, born April 1st, 1 763. 

Johnathan Leavitt, son of Rev, Jfjhnathan and Sarah Leavitt, born February 
27th, 1764. 

Olive Messer, son of Timothy and Hannah Messev, bcrn February 4th, 1761. 

Tiinuthy Mcsscr, son uf Timothy and Hannah Messer, born November 29th, 

1763- 
John Kilburn, son of John and Content Kilburn, born August 30th, 1765. 

Jirza French, daughter of John and Olive French, born May 15th, 1765. 

Moses Spear, son of Andrew and Mary Spear, born October 26th, 1765. 

Mary Spear, daugliter of Andrew and Mary, born Septeuiber 1 8th, 1767. 

Claracy Babcock, daughter of Amos and Peggy, born November 2Sth, 1770. 

Toly Babcock, daughter of Amos and Peggy, born November 29th, 1 770. 

Saily Babcock, daughter of Amos and Peggy, born October 2d, 1772. 

David Ritter, son of Daniel and Martha, born October 26th, 1766. 

Eunice RitJer, daughter of Daniel and Martha, born February 25th, 1 770. 

Ruben Smith Ritter, son of Daniel and Martha, born February 15th, 1772. 

Jason Barrister, son of Benjamin and Ruth, born March 29th, 1764. 

Artemus Barrister, son of Benjamin and Ruth, born June 5, 1767. 

Rebecca Bellows, daughter of John and Rebecca, born October i8th, 1771. 

John Bellows, son of Jt>hn and Rebecca, born February isi, 1773. 

Levi Allen, son of Aaron and Sarah, born March 12th, 1771. 

John Allen, son of Aaron and Sarah, born December 22d, 1772. 

Dorothy Whitcomb, daugther of Nathaniel and Lucy Whitcomb, born July 6th, 
1772. 

Hannah Bundy, daughter of Asahel and Esther, born November 28th, 1771. 

John Jenison, son of John and Sil:)el, born February 7th, 1773. 

Thomas Green Fcsscnden, son of Rev. Mr. Thomas and Elizabeth, born April 
22d, I77I. 

Elizabeth Fessenden, born January 21st, 1773. 

Josiah Reed, Jr., son of Josiah and Hephzibeth, born September 28th, 1773. 

Martha Russell, daughter of Jcduthun and Susanna, born March 19th, 1773. 

47 



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48 WALPOLE, N. H.— RECORD OF BIRTHS. 

Aseph Stow, son of Jonah and Lydia, born August 20th, 1773. 
^ Johnathan Bixby, son of Jonathan and Esther, born July 14th, 1773. 

Molly Gilman, daughter of Constantine and Mehittabel, born June 3d, 1772. 
Joseph Gilman, son, born June 3d, 1772. 

Ammassa Hudson, son of Benjamin and Bridget, born April 5th, 1773. 
Betty Wade, daughter of I'homas and Dorothy, born August 7th, 1773. 
Percy Webber, daughter of Christopher and Hannah, born April 19th, 176Q. 
Sarah and Elizabeth Webber, daughters of Christopher and Hannah, born 
February i8th, 1771. 

Christopher Webber, son, bornMarch 7th, 1773. 

Mary Bellows, daughter of Benjamin, Jr., and Phebe, born April 23d, 1774. 

Joseph Bundy, son of Asahel and Esther, born April 3, 1774. 

Sarah Swan, daughter of Ebenezer and Sarah, born April 26th, 1 771. 

Patty Swan, daughter, born August 20th, 1773. 

Eunice French, daughter of John and Olive, born May 14th, 1767. 

Abijah French, son, born March 29th, 1771. 

Giles French, son, born July 28th, 1773. 

Oliver Steams Sparliawk, son of Thomas and Rebecca, born i6th, 1771. 

Mary Sparhawk, daughter, born September 30th, 1773. 

Sampson Drury, son of Manoah and Martha, born November' 12th, 1774. 

Hannah Webber, daughter of Christopher and Hannah, born February 19th, 

1775- 

Sybil Eastman, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth, born April 28th, 1773. 

Thomas Swan, son of Ebenezer and Sarah, born January 23d, 1775. 

Thomas Smith, son of Elisha and Dorcas, born November 30th, 1774. 

*^ Samuel Bixby, son of Jonathan and Esther, born July 17th, 1775. 

Jonathan Jenison, son of Jonathan and Rhoda, born August 30th, 1775. 

Mary Hudson, daughter of Benjamin and Bridget, born December 9th, 1775. 

Esther Bellows, daughter of Benjamin, Jr., and Phebe, born December 9th, 

1775- 

P21izabeth Kilburn, daughter of John and Content, born, February 2d, 1776. 

Sarah Iladly, of Ithiel and Sarah, born March 28th, 1767. 

Abigail Hadly, born December 5th, 1773. 

Ithiel Hadly, l-orn August 8, 1774. 

Benjamin Eastman, son of Philip and Elizabeth, born January 23d, 1775. 

Mary Allen, daughter of Aar'^n and Sarah, l)orn November loth, 1774. 

Artimas Allen, son of, born October 2, 1776. 

Reuben Fay, son of Joseph and Lucy, horn April 3d, 1776. 

Marthy Drewry, daughter ^Ienoah and Martha, born September 14th, 1776' 

Elijah Drewry, son, born November 14th, 1 773. 

Elizabeth Eastman, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth, born April 14th, 1777- 

Olive Snow, dauglUer of Eli and Sarah Snow, born March 27th, 1775' 

Molly Bellows, daughter of Benjamin and Mary, born October 2Sth, 1764. 

Josiah Bellows, born October 31st, 1767. 

[to be continued.] 



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LIST OF ESTATES, SETTLEHENTS OF WHICH ARE 
RECORDED IN HASSACHUSETTS ARCHIVES, 

Vol. XVI., 1666=1697. 



William Alford, of Boston. 1676. Will. 
John Bastar. 1691. Will. 
Thomas Bligh, Jr., of Boston. 1682. Will. 
George Call,ender, of Boston. 1695. Inventory. 
Mercy Downing, of Salem. 1695. Will. 
Zerubbabel Endicott, of Salem. 1683. Will. 
Nathaniel Fox, of Boston. 1689. Inventory. 
Joseph Oilman, of Boston. 1680. Will. 
Isaac Griggs, of Boston. 1686. Inventory. 
Richard Hall, of Dorchester. 1691. Will. 
William Hall. 1693. Inventory. 
Thomas Hawley. 1676. Inventory. 
John Hohson, of Rowley. 1684. Inventory. 
Ruth Johnson, of Boston. 1677. Will. 
James Joy, of Hingham. 1697. Will. 
Thomas Joy, of Hingham. 1677. Will. 
Daniel King of Swampscott. 1671. Will. 
Peter Lidgett, of Boston. 1670 and 1675. Will. 
James Lloyd, of Boston. 1684. Will. 
George Lowell, of Boston. 1690. Will. 

49 



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50- ■ PROBATE IN MASSACHUSETTS ARCHIVES. 

James Ludden, of Weymouth. 1688. Will and inventory. 
James Neibor, of Huntino^ton, L. I. 1671. Will. 
William Penn, of Boston. 1688. Will. 
John Philips, of Boston. 1683. Will. 
John Pierce, of Boston. 1684. Will. 

(His widow Ruth married William Fuller.) 
Walter Price, of Salem. 1674. Will and inventory. 
Mark Quilter, of Ipswich. 1678. Will and inventory. 
John Russell, of Woburn. 1676. Will. 
William Salters. 1675. Will. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Saffin, of Boston. 1682. Will. 
Thomas Savage. 1675. Will and inventory. . ■ ,- 

John Smith of Boston. 1673. Will. ^ :^^^^ ^. :":>:. 

Joseph Stevens, of Braintree. 1684. Inventory. 
Samuel Symonds, of Ipswich, Deputy Governor. 1666. 
Will. 1676. Inventory. . ' ^ ^ .-, 

Peter Till, of . 1697. Will. 

Hezekiah Usher, of Boston. 1676. Will. 

Christopher Webb. 1694. Will. 

Ephraim Wilder, of Hingham. 1687. Will. 

Nathaniel Woodwar, of Boston. 1675. Will. ; • 



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'♦JONATHAN PRINCE, JR., HIS BOOK." 



[Tills interesting fragment is in the possession of Mr. Edward Prince, of 
Quincy, 111., who has a large collection of data concerning the Prince family 
. of Danvers. 

Jonathan Prince, whose curious entries are produced below, was born in 
Danvers, then a part of Salem, 21 January, 1734. He married 6 June, 
1754, Lydia, the sister of Judge Holton. Judge Holton figured largely in 
state and continental affairs during the struggle for independence, and had 
studied medicine with the elder Jonathan Prince. The father of Jonathan 
Prince, also named Jonathan, was a well known and widely respected physi- 
cian in Dangers. He may have been the first resident physician there. 

Dr. Jonathan Prince, Jr., died in Salem, 11 December, 1759, but is 
burled in the Prince burial lot on Spring Street, Danvers. 
. For a short account of this family see " Materials for a Genealogy of the 
Prince Family," by Eben Putnam, printed in "The Historical Collections 
of the Essex Institute."'] 

The Record Begins i January, 1753, and is in an 
"Almanack for 1753," by >yATHANiEL Ames. 

1753- 

8 January. I went to see Air. John Wilkins in his sickness 
before he died. 

15 January. Israel Cheever had a son born. 

21 January. I was then 19 years old. To Jno. Andrews to 
see Sarah Towle. Matthew Whipple g. died. 

22 January. To Lt. Henry Putnam's vid.* his youngest 
g.* and to Uncle James Prince, Vid Amos, Szc. 

. 27 January. To Jos. Putnam, Jr., to see his g. ye wind. 

28 January. George Wiate, Jr., had a g. borne but dead. 

29 January. To Jos. Putnam to see his g.; to Enos Knite to 
see his oldest g. 

Two children born and two children died. 

2 February. To Middleton to Colesmith's to dress his g. 
finger that was out and Oth. Wilkin and Widdo' Wilkins, etc. 

3 February. Oliv'' Putnam had a son born. 

4 February. Oliver Putnam's son bpt. Oliver. 

5 February. Thunder and lightening. 



*-Vid=:vide i g.=child. 

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52 "JONATHAN PRINCE, JR., HIS BOOK." 

8 February. To Mr. Fairfield, Israel Hutchinson, to Uncle 
i James in the night. 

i * II February. Sunday. Asa Putnam had a son borne. 

13 February. To Timo. Prince; toTrostfish brook to meet 
. D^. Hugh Boulton, an Irishman, that cured Cancers; to Sam^ 

I \ Crosses; he and I came home. Father bought his secret for 

; j cancers. With a post-prandium as far as Sam^ Endicot's ; to Sam^ 

; Crosses in the even' at D''. Fairfield, <S:c. 

' j 13 February. Asa Putnam had a son bapt. Peter. 

^ 21 February. Sam^ Flint's g. died. 

23 February. Phinehas Putnam had a son born. 

24 February. To Jona. Bailey's. 
26 February. 'Fo Uncle Jas. Prince, vid. Amos. 

Three chiiren born this month and one died, Szc. 
J March. To Josh. Swinnerton's. 
II March. To Kiah Wilkins vid. Bray's uxor and g. 

D"^. Amos Putnam had a note of Thanks for a g. born of late. 
13 March. Ab'' Goodale. Wal. Smith. 
16 March. Wm. Smith. Peter Twist. 

18 March. Mr. Crocker preached. 
Dr. Putnam had a g. bpt. Elz^. 

19 March. Sgt. Sam^ Putnam had a daughter borne. 

20 March. To Henry Wilkins. Robins plenty. 

24 March. Nat^ Pope had girl born this week. 

25 March. Mrs. Masury. 
Sgt. Sm^ Putnam's g. name was Elz^. Bcnj. Sawyer g. 

name Amos. Will Hutchinson told me he heard 
frogs peep this day. 

29 A4arch. Old Mrs. Whipple died. 
Twice to Mrs. Masury. 

30 March. To Middleton, Boxford, and Topsfield. Anna 
. , Goodale died. 

31 March. To Salem, Marblehead, and Mrs. Masury's. 
A bad and mortal fever of late in the towns around, 

especially in Ipswich. 



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"JONATHAN PRINCE, JR., HIS BOOK." 53 

Four children born ; two persons died. 
I The spring is quite forward at present, the grass is very 

green. Everywhere ahiiost. 

1 April. To Jere. Nickhold's. 

2 April. To Tho. Town ; to Will. Flint ; Mrs. Masury. 

3 April. To Arch. Putnam, Jona. Putnam, Tho. Town. 

4 April. Josh. Swinnerton's, &c. ^ 

8 April. Mr. Fairweather preached. 
John Nickols had a g. born ; before morning Peter Twist's 

wife died. 

9 April. To Uncle James, Humphrey Case, Henry Putnam, 
Arch. Dale. 

II April. Jno. Nichols g. bpt., his name John. 

18 April. To N. Alason's, who lives on Browns'^ farm. 

19 April. To Jos. Jacob. 
22 April. Mr. ^ayerweather preached. 

24 April. 1 hos. Town, Caleb Putnam. 

25 April. To Jos. Putnam ; to Beverly. 
27 April. To Jno. Nichols, Dea. Edwards, Jno. Preston, 

Elis Flint, to Beverly. Peach trees in full bloom. 
30 April. Sam^ Flint died in the night. 

Two children born ; three persons died. 

10 May. My father died between three and four; such a day 
as I never saw before. 

Sat., 12 May. My father was buried ; his bearers were : Capt. 
Epes, D''. Tappin, Mr. Bat. Rea, Benj. Fairfield, Tho. Andrew, 
and John Andrew. 

The remaining entries are very few. We note : — 

Sept. 26. To Boston, with Bat. Rea and his wife. Mater and 
Jno. Prince. 

Oct. 23. Comet Sam^ Holten's wife taken with an ague fit 
and fever before day. 

Dec. 6. I lent Lt. Henry Putnam Diggby on humane Bodies. 

*Probably in Marblehead. 






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AN ENGLISH VERSION OF THE BATTLE OF 

STONY CREEK. 






To residents of the Niagara peninsula, the chief battle-ground 
of the war of i8 12-15, ^^^ history of that struggle is especially- 
interesting, and our local antiquarians grow as enthusiastic over 
a fresh fact or incident of the period as a geologist when 
he discovers a new fossil. The following contemporaneous 
account of the battle of Stony Creek, has not hitherto been pub- 
lished. It has been kindly communicated to the " Spectator " 
by Geo. H. Mills, president of theWentworth Historical Society. 
Mr. Mills has been in correspondence with the adjutant of the 
Eighth or King's regiment, now stationed at Halifax, with a view 
to discover whether there is anything referring to the battle of 
Stony Creek in the regimental records, and the result of the corre- 
spondence is gratifying. Adjutant C. J. Steavenson has for- 
warded to Mr. Mills several extracts from the regimental records 
1} for the years 1812-13, which contains a succinct but graphic 

account of the night attack at Stony Creek and its result. We 
reproduce it in full : — 

"The five companies of the regiment, under Major Ogilvie, 
which had retired from Fort George, had taken a post on Bur- 
lington Heights, at the head of Lake Ontario, where about 1,600 
.. men were assembled under Brigadier-General Vincent. Three 

thousand five hundred Americans with a field train and two hun- 
dred and fifty dragoons advanced against the British detachment 
and drove the pickets from Stony Creek. The light companies 
of the Eighth and Forty-ninth regiments, commanded by Lieut.- 

54 



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ENGLISH VERSION OF BATTLE OF STONY CREEK. " 55 

Col. Harvey moved forward on the fifth of June to reconnoitre ; 
and, having ascertained the position of the enemy's camp, the 
five companies of the Eighth under Major Ogilvie, and the 
Forty-ninth regiment (mustering together only seven hundred 
and four bayonets), advanced at eleven at night against the 
enemy's post at Stony Creek, where nearly four thousand oppo- 
nents were assembled. After traversing seven. miles of difficult 
road with great secrecy, the enemy's camp was surprised. The 
British dashed among their opponents with undaunted bravery, 
routed the very superior number of the Americans with great 
slaughter, and made Brigadier-Generals Chandler and Winter 
(first and second in command), with upwards of one hundred 
officers and men, prisoners ; also captured three guns, one brass 
howitzer, and three tumbrils. 

" Brigadier-General Vincent observed in his report of this 
brilliant enterprise : ' Major Ogilvie led on in most gallant man- 
ner the five companies of the king's regiment j and whilst one 
half of that highly disciplined and distinguished corps supported 
the Forty-ninth, the other part moved to the right and attacked 
the enemy's left flank, which decided our midnight contest.' 

" The Americans, though driven from the camp, hovered in 
crowds in the neighboring woods, and being four times more 
numerous than the British, the latter withdrew. The Americans, 
being enforced, took post at Forty Mile Creek. 

"The -loss of the Eighth at the surpiise of the American 
camp at Stony Creek was : Lieut. Hooper, two sergeants, and 
seven rank and file killed ; Major Ogilvie, Captains Munday 
and Goldrick, Lieutenants Weyland and Boyd, four sergeants, 
and fifty-one rank and file, wounded; thirteen rank and file mis- 
ing." 

There are two points in connection with the battle of Stony 
Creek about which some doubt has existed and over which 
there has been controversy. The extracts from the regi- 
mental records of the Eighth, printed above, should settle 
these doubts and end the controversy. One of the points 



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ENGLISH A' ERSION OF BATTLE OF STONY CREEK. 



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is the number of the Americans in camp at Stony Creek. 
It has been held that the number was grossly exaggerated — 
that it is absurd to suppose that 700 men could break up 
a camp of nearly 4,000 and put them to flight. The exact num- 
ber is, however, given in the regimental record, and the informa- 
tion w^as no doubt obtained from the American commanding 
officer, who was taken prisoner. 

The other point of controversy is as to whether Gen. Vincent 
was present in person at the battle of Stony Creek. From the 
regimental account of the affair it will be seen that he did not 
accompany the noble seven hundred, but very properly remained 
on Burlington Heights with the main force under his command. 
The chief glory of the brilliant feat of arms should be shared by 
two men. One of these is Lieut. Fitzgibbon, who, after having 
penetrated into the enemy's camp in the disguise of a settler with 
butter for sale, proposed the night attack to General Vincent, and 
led the way. The other is Col. Harvey, who commanded the 
little band of heroes. — Hamilton Spectator. 






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BOOK NOTES. 



Authors and publishers are requested to direct books sent for notice to 
the Editor, 49 North Prospect St., Burlington, Vermont. The space for a 
brief notice of any worthy publication Is gladly given, as there is no doubt 
that in this manner many special publications are brought to the attention of 
purchasers. Publishers are requested to state the price of publication. 

History of Norfolk, Conn., 1744— 1900, by Theron 
VVilmot Crissy, Everett, Mass., 1900. 8vo., pp. 648. Price, 
;$3.8o. 

Norfolk was incorporated in 1758, then containing twenty- 
seven families. The township had been laid out in 1726, and 
oftered for sale by the General Assembly in 1738 arid again in 
1742. In 1847 there was published a history of the town from 
1738 to 1844, in eighty-nine pages. In 1856 the late Rev. Jos. 
Eldndge, D. D., began to deliver as an annual Thanksgiving 
sermon chapters of the fuller history of the town which he had in 
hand, but never completed. Air. Crissy has had the use of the 
Eldridge MSS., and has printed three chapters, giving the history 
of the town to 1775 with his own work. The remainder of 
the book covers the subjects to which such a work should be 
devoted, admirably, historical, physical, institutional, genealogical, 
and anecdotal. - - 

The Record of My Ancestry by Charles L. Newhall, 
Southbridge, 1899. 8vo., pp. 222. Price, $2.00. 

This collection of genealogies of the families of Newhall, 
Hills, Potter, Greene, Fosdick, Shapleigh, Bemis, Whiting, Sher- 

57 






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58 BOOK NOTEb. 

man, Johnson, Wiswall, Lamb, Upham, Goble, Dana, Wood, 
Harrington, Merriam, Jefferie, Pierce, Stone, Walker, and others, 
is a useful compilation of the latest results of researches concern- 
ing the emigrant founders of these families with the line contin- 
ued to such point as the author's interest ceased. Several geneal- 
ogies, as those of Nevvhall, Stone, Johnson, are quite extensive. 
An excellent chart is appended, showing the whole range of 
ancestry of the compiler. 

Commonplace-book of Richard Pratt of Lynn, Mass., 
with an introduction and notes by Nathan M. Hawkes, printed 
for Micajah Pratt Clougli by the Nichols Press, Lynn, 1900. 
8vo., pp. 75. 

Richard Pratt was born in 1728 and died in 1816 ; for twenty 
years, 1755 to 1775, this worthy schoolmaster kept a journal in 
which he noted important events, births, deaths, marriages, church 
and family happenings. Such an important record deserved to 
be made available and that this has been done is due to the liber- 
ality of Mr. Clough, and the labor of Mr. Hawkes, both descend- 
ants of Richard Pratt. Lewis, the historian of Lynn, had access 
to the MSS. 

The Cycle Days of New England by N. M. Hawkes, 

pp. 16. 

This is a reprint from the memorial volume of the 50th anni- 
versary celebration at Lynn 14 May, 1900. The author has 
found some striking coincidences in a cycle of eighty-six years 
applied to New England history. He enumerates four cycles 
of eighty-six years with the initial and dramatic movement on 
the 19th April, all of which will recur to the reader. Palfrey 
alludes to the same striking coincidence. -' 

Contributions to the History of Old Derryfield, 
N. H., by Wm. Ellery Moore, Parts L-V., Manchester, N. H. 

Price, $1.25. 

Mr. Moore died 22 October, 1900, and Manchester, (Derry- 
field) lost one who was deeply interested and competent to 



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BOOK NOTES. 59 

record the history of a place which, to quote the author, " had a 
considerable number of inhabitants, who were rollicking, devil- 
may-care roysterers," lacked a schoolhouse till 1795, and a 
settled minister for nearly as long a period. 

The " Contributions " deal mainly with the natural features 
of the locality, its Indian inhabitants, and earliest s'ettlers. 

A Sketch of the Munroe Clan, also of William 
Munroe, who settled in Lexington, etc., by James P. Munroe. 
Boston, 1900. 8vo., cloth, pp. 80. 

This is an abstract of a " History of the Munros," by the 
late Alexander Mackenzie of Scotland, a volume of 600 pages, 
together with a good though incomplete account of the descend- 
ants of William Munro, a Scotchman, who settled in Lexington, 
Mass., in 1652, whose descendant. Ensign Robert Munroe, was 
the first man killed at the battle of Lexington. 

The chief family of Monro in Scotland, the Barons Fowlis, 
were for four centuries buried in Ross. 

From that distinguished family descended Robert Monro of 
Aldic, Commissary of Caithness, who had four sons, Robert, 
George, William, and Benedict, of whom William was born in 
1625. It is said they all participated in the battle of Worcester; 
that Benedict fled to Germany and became Baron von Meikeldorf ; 
that William was taken prisoner and sent to New England on the 
"John and Sara." It appears that there were four prisoners named 
Monrow in the company, i. e., Robert, John, Hugh, and another 
name illegible, who is assumed to be William. William Monro 
of Lexington was a Scot; was born in 1625 and was, "with- 
out any doubt," a political prisoner ; therefore it is reasonably 
asserted that he was that William, the son of Robert of Aldie. 
He married Martha, daughter of John George ; second, Mary 
Ball ; third, Eliz^. Johnson, widow of Edward Wyer. She died 
in 1715 and William in 17 17, leaving a large family whose 
descendants have been prominent in this country. The book fs 
extremely interesting. 



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6o BOOK NOTES. 

Memorials of the Ouisenberry Family in Germany, 
England, and America, by Anderson C. Quisenberry. 8vo., 
cloth. Washington, 1890. Price, $3.00. 

The author traces the family from Tielmann Questenberg 
(born i38o),of Cologne, Germany,through his grandson, Heinrich 
Questenberg, son of a merchant of the Flanseatic League, doing 
business in London and Lubec, who married in England in 1468 
and settled there, where his descendants for 250 years were called 
Questenbury, Quessenberry, etc.; and from whence Thomas 
Questenbury came to Virginia about 1625 and was the founder 
of the American family known as Questenbury, Ouesenberry, 
Quisenberry, etc. 

The same author, in 1897, published the "Genealogical 
A4emoranda of the Quisenberry Family," relating solely to the 
family in America, whereas the present volume, resulting from a 
clue since received and persistently followed, displays German 
and P2nglish records carrying the name back to as early a date as 
1380. The insertion of fac-similes of ancient registers, and of 
abstracts from the data on which the history is based adds much 
to its value. 
J Other forms of the name are Cushenberry and Quissinburrowe. 

The book makes a handsome volume, and contains the coat- 
of-arms, hand-painted in colors, of Questenberg of Cologne ; also 
fac-similes of signatures of members of the family from 1605 to 
the present time. * 

Historic Duxbury in Plymouth County, Mass., by 
Laurence Bradford. Boston, 1900. pp. 128. Illustrated. 

Duxbury was incorporated 7 June, 1637, and in 1643 ^"^^^ it 
, is supposed, 400 inhabitants. In 1840, there were 2,798 inhabi- 
tants ; at the present time about 2,000. But as its population 
has decreased, interest in its antiquities, its history and historic 
personages has increased. The history of the town, published 
by the late Justin Winsor in 1849, is not now easily obtain- 
able; hence this little volume will be eagerly welcomed. 



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A description of the place from its first settlement in 1630, 
by Standish, Brewster, and Alden, and good though brief sketches 
of the more prominent of the early settlers are given. 

Among the features of the book is a list of gravestones in the 
old cemetery in South Duxbury, and a description of the first 
houses and their occupants. 

There is but one gravestone in Duxbury bearing a date earlier 
than 1700, and but five in Plymouth, all of date later than 1680. 
There is not a grave of one of the Mayflower passengers that is 
absolutely known ; that is, in the Old Colony. 

It IS a curious fact that the only one known is in King's 
Chapel burial ground in Boston, where is the tomb of the Boston 
branch of the Winslow family ; in the vaults beneath are the 
remains of John Winslov.' and his v/ife Mary Chilton of the 
Mayflower passengers. Mr. Bradford has given particular 
attention to correcting errors arising from tradition and has placed 
every resident of, and visitor to, the historic town, under great 
obligations. 

In the Thirteenth Report on Public Records of 
Massachusetts, the Commissioner agitates anew the question of a 
Public Record Ofiice. In this matter he should receive the sup- 
port of every person interested in our early history and genealogy. 

The accumulation of records and insufficient compensation 
renders it more and more difficult for the local clerks to give 
necessary attention to the care and arrangement of records not in 
constant demand. 

The states of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, 
are provided with Record Commissioners, who have supervision 
of records. Vermont has not yet come to the realization of the 
advantages of expert advice and supervision of her records ; 
whenever that time arrives the good work done by Mr. Swan 
in Massachusetts will serve as a guide as to ways and means of 
obtaining excellent results. 
. In 1899, seventeen, and in 1900, seven towns in Massachu- 



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62 BOOK NOTES. 

setts suffered from fires which destroyed the place of deposit of 
public records. In 1900, through the close attention to the law 
requiring vaults and safes, no records were destroyed, though 
in many cases damaged. A few years ago in most of these 
cases the damage from similar fires would have been total and 
irreparable. . , 

Plymouth County Marriages, i 692-1 746, Reprinted 
from " The Genealogical Advertiser," Vols. I. and II. Pam- 
phlet, pp. 48. 

The appearance of this valuable help to searchers of Old 
Colony records is apparently, premature, its issue having been 
forced upon the publisher by the appearance of " Plymouth 
County A^larriages," one of the several volumes published by the 
Rev. F. W. Bailey (who is otherwise known as " The Bureau of 
American Ancestry ") and which volume omits what occupies 
pages 3 to 19 of Mrs. Greenlaw's pamphlet, being contained in a 
volume of court records unknown to Mr. Bailey. 

The fact that the " Genealogical Advertiser " was publishing 
these records in each issue should have been sufiicicnt to have 
caused Mr. Bailey to have sought other fields, which are numer- 
ous enough, than that already preempted by a competent publisher. 
With the abundance of material available there is no need of 
duplicating printed material, yet it is being done in more than 
one quarter, to the present loss of the genealogical investigator. 

I Historical Sketches and Reminiscences of an Octo- 

I genarian, by Thomas C. Preston, Richmond, Va., [B. F. John- 

son Co.]. 8vo., cloth, pp. 170. 

Virginia historians, as a rule, have attempted to cover too wide 

a territory to do justice to any one section ; often making many 

* and serious errors in describing events and family connections 

1 of districts with which they are unfamiliar. Mr. Preston has 

I written chiefly about Washington County, and the town of 

Abingdon, the people who settled therein and their descendants. 



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Southwestern Virginia was largely settled by the Scotch-Irish, 
among whom were the Prestons. 

Washington County was one of the three counties formed 
from Fincastle,* the other two being Montgomery and Ken- 
tucky. 

Fort Chiswell, now in Wythe County, was the county seat, 
was probably the meeting place of the " West Augusta " 
patriots, were drevv^ up the famous " Fincastle Resolutions," 
dated 20 January, 1775, which were sent to Gen. Washington, 
then sitting in the convention in Philadelphia. The book is 
valuable for its genealogical data, its account of the manners and 
customs of the people, and for the authority with which the 
author writes. 

Daniel Hovey of Ipswich, by Rev, Horace C. Hovey. 
Pamphlet, pp. 11. ' 

Daniel Hovey was ast. 73, at the date of making his will, 21 
March, 1 69 1-2, proved 3 October, 1692. It is not known 
whence he came. The name is found in England, Scotland, 
Ireland, and Wales. There is good reason to believe that Daniel 
Hovey is the "Mr. HofFe " who came on the Griirin in 1633, 
and who, in 1637, was associated with Dummer, Saltonstall, and 
Wheelwright. In 1637 "Daniel Hovey" was one of the pro- 
prietors in Ipswich. He joined the Quaboag or Brookficld 
colony in 1668 and after the destruction of that place he removed 
to Hadley, finally returning to Ipswich, where he died, leaving 
an estate of ;^6o6. His wife was Abigail, sister of Thomas 
Andrews, the schoolmaster at Ipswich, and daughter of Robert 
Andrews. They had children, Abigail married to John Ayres, 
Daniel, John, Thomas, James, Joseph, Nathaniel, and perhaps 
Matthew. 

The pamphlet corrects some important errors which have 
hitherto passed current. 



*Flncastlc was established in 1772, abolished in 1776. It included all of 
Virginia west of Montgomery County. 



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64 BOOK NOTES. 

Ancestral Chart, Together with Working Charts, 
by Georgiaiia Guild. Price, $7.00. 

The Genealogist of the Rhode Island Society of Colonial 
Dames has published in elegant form, a collection of blanks, 
— especially adapted for the record of ancestors of Americans 
• whose progenitors were of the first settlers. The arrangement 
of the blanks follows the style of the best systems nov/ in use. 
Each leaf provides for the record of six generations, the sixth 
generation on one chart becoming the first in order on the suc- 
ceeding chart. By this means elev^en generations are provided 
for on two leaves. The arrangement is simple. 

The Ancestral Chart is an oblong of a large yet convenient 
size and shape, and sells for $5.00, while the Working Charts 
are identical with the exception of being smaller and without the 
space for notes provided for in the larger book. This duplication 
permits of experimental work before transferring final records to 
the more complete manuscript. We should suppose Miss Guild's 
forms v/ould become popular with the Colonial Dames and allied 
societies. , . 

Ye Ancient Burial Place of New London, Conn., 
New London, 1899. Oblong, cloth, pp. 40, with many illus- 
trations. 

Mr. Edward Prentis, who has performed a great service to his 
townspeople and antiquarians in placing before them in print 
I copies of the inscriptions in the old burial place, states that many 

|j ■ of the stones being slate are well preserved, but the majority are 

of softer nature and fast becoming a prey to the elements. The 
burial place was laid out in 1645, ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ oldest place of 
interment in Eastern Connecticut. It is thought that the first 
- interment was in 1652. The oldest inscribed stone remaining is 
that of Capt. Richard Lord, who died 17 May, 1662, a^t. 51. 

The book not only contains an alphabetical arrangement 
of inscriptions, but an interesting and carefully prepared history 
of the burial place with reference, in chronological order, to the 



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BOOK NOTES. 65 

earliest and more important later bi^rials. The illustrations of 
the stones are numerous and well printed, adding much to the 
value of the book, both to students of early monumental remains 
and to members of the families represented. A feature of the 
book is a bird's eye view of the cemetery with the gravestones 
numbered, which numbers refer to the list of inscriptions. Such 
books as this are a very great gain to local history and genealogy. 

Family Records of Some Descendants of Robert 
Francis, of Wethersfield, Conn., by Carrie E. Chatfield, of 
Minneapolis, Minn. . • 

This pamphlet gives the history of a family closely identified 
with Wethersfield for six generations. Robert Francis is first 
mentioned on the town records in 1651. He died 2 January, 
171 1, aet. 83 (g. s.) His wife, Joan, died 29 January, 
1705, ast. 76 (g. s.) There were eight chddrcn in the 
family, but this useful account by Miss Chatfield is confined to 
descendants of John, the second son, (born 4 September, 1658, 
died 28 December, 1711), who married Mercy Chittenden. 

V 

Lexington, Mass., Records of Births, Marriages, and 
Deaths, (to 1898). 8vo., pp. 480. 

This record is compiled by authority from the vital registers 
of the town, the church records of Lexington (1690— 1844), and 
Cambridge (from 1658), of which place Lexington was a parish 
or precinct, from 1692-17 13, and of Cambridge town records. 
Many dates of baptism are printed, either to replace the unknown 
dates of births, or supplementary to the birth entries. 

Lexington was incorporated in 17 13, being formerly known 
as Cambridge Farms. The arrangement of the entries is alpha- 
betical under the different classes of records. The book is a 
credit to the town and to the editor, Mr. N. A. Sparhawk. 

Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper 
County, Va., embracing a revised and enlarged edition 01 
Dr. Philip Slaughter's History of St. Mark's Parish. Raleigh 



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66 BOOK NOTSE. 

T. Green, Culpeper, Va., 1900. 8vo., pp. iSo-f-xxvi. Price, 

Dr. Slaughter conceived the work which, later, was to a 
certain extent completed in briefer form by Bishop Meade, the 
history of the parishes in Virginia. He had published histories 
of Bristol Parish (Petersburg) and St. George's Parish in Spottsyl- 
vania before ill health required the suspension of his labors. 
His notes were incorporated in the great work of Bishop 
Meade — " Old Churches and Families of Virginia." St. Mark's 
Parish was incorporated in 173 1. In 1720 Spottsylvania County 
was formed from parts of Essex, King and Queen, and 
King William County, whose jurisdiction had hitherto ex- 
tended to the mountains. St. George's Parish contemporaneous 
with Spottsylvania, was formed by the same act. In 1731 St. 
Mark's was set off", and from St. Mark's in 1752 Bromfield 
Parish, and 1734 Orange County was formed out of Spottsyl- 
vania, Culpeper from Orange in 1 748, Madison from Culpeper in 
1792 and Rappahannock from Culpeper in 1831. Greene v»'as 
formed from Orange in 1838. 

Thus is a wide territory more or less connected with the Cul- 
peper of which this volume treats. To reprint Slaughter's history 
was much good m itself, but by adding much of later interest with 
genealogical notes of prominent families and especially the mar- 
riage records of the county from 1 781—1825, with many 
abstracts from Probate documents, Mr. Green has rendered 
accessible a mass of valuable and interesting information. 
Among the families noticed at considerable length are those of 
Slaughter, Ashby, Ball, Barbour, Broaddus, Brown, Browning, 
Bryan-Lillard, Carter, Cave, Clayton, Cole, Coleman, Conway, 
Cooke, Field, Fontaine, Fry, Garrett, Glassell, Greene, Grin- 
nan, HeJiry-Winston, Hill, Jones, Madison, Mason, Pendle- 
ton, Rice, Somerville, Spottswoode, Strother, Taylor, Thorn, 
Thompson, Williams, Yancey. 

The book is a boon to students of genealogy in Virginia, where 
the records are both scattered and incomplete. 



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QUERIES. 



Who were the ancestors of Ephraim Knapp, born in 1746; 
(lied in Arlington, Vt., in 182 1. E. D. W. 

Parentage desired of the following : — 

Abigail Choate, who married Eliphalet Bailey, of Natick, 
Mass., about 17S0. 

Elizabeth Barker, who married Phincas Tyler, of Rowley, 
Mass., about 1775. 

Elnathan Polly, Leominster, wife Rebecca Warner of Har- 
vard. 

Walker Canficld, born February 5, 1789; married Betsey 
Baldwin June 28, 1 808, at New Milford, Conn. 

James, George, Joseph, and Mary Brotherton of New York 
City. James was a member of the New York Bar Pilot's 
Charitable Association In the early part of this century. 

Mary, Gertrude, and Garrett Leonard Ten Brock, born at 
Red Hook on the Hudson in the fore part of this century. 

Lydia Whitney, wife of Phineas Warner, of Harvard. 

Caleb Howard, Mendon, Mass., who married Elizabeth Taft, 
of Oxbridge ; also parentage of Elizabeth Taft. 

Mary Howard, who married Ebenezer Taft ; also parentage 
of Ebenezer Taft. 

Catherine Berry, wife of James Brown, of Lynn, Mass.; 
removed to Vermont. 

Mrs. E. H. Bailey, 

205 High St., Streater, 111. 

67 



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68 QUERIES. 

Answer to Query : P. 60, Vol. VII., N. S. 

Samuel Bancroft's son, Nathaniel, horn at Reading, Mass., 
March 17, 1720, married Alehitable Damon, of Reading, 
March 5, 1745, he then of Sherburn, Mass. Nathaniel Ban- 
croft's will, Middlesex ss., then of Framingham, cordwainer, 
(dated May 24, 1749) names wife Mehetable, and children, 
Mehetable, ast. about two years, eight months (bapt. Oct. 
12, 1746) and Nathaniel at. about seven months. Ben- 
jamin Bennett, Jr., and wife Mehetable, of Hopkinton, execu- 
tors of will. Presented to probate Nov. 20, 1749, John Temple 
and Joseph Damoji, of Reading, bondsman. 

May 8, 1751, Zachanah Nichols, married Mehitable Bancroft, 
of Reading, who may have been the widow above named. 

As Joseph Damon is named as one of the bondsmen, we infer 
that Nathaniel Bancroft married iVIehitable Damon as appears 
on the Reading Jlecords. 

I have never been able to learn more regarding these children 
named here, Nathaniel and Mehitable. 

J. M. B., Blcomfield, N. J. 



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NOTES. , 

Waters' Genealogical Gleanings in England. 

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, if subscrip- 
tions sufficient to warrant the undertaking be obtained, will issue, 
in two volumes of about 800 pages each, " Genealogical Glean- 
ings in England," by Henry F. Waters, A. M. 

The greatest difficulty with which the American genealogist is 
forced to contend lies in the Emigrant Ancestor. To prove his 
identity, to show who he was, where he was born, from what 
part of England he came, and to establish the connection between 
English and American families of the same name, have been found 
hitherto, in most instances, impossible. , * . ^^ 

These " Gleanings," in short, abound in clues, which, if 
properly followed up, will enable the genealogist to pursue in the 
mother country investigations which, without such aid, would be 
practically impossible. 

The preliminary publication of these " Gleanings" was made in 
instalments in the "• New England Historical and Genealogical 
Register," and extended over a period of seventeen years. Dis- 
persed in sixty different places in the pages of that quarterly, 
they have not been as accessible as it is now the purpose to 
make them. In the permanent form in which they will now 
appear, it is believed that they will prove of even greater value 
than heretofore. 

The contemplated edition will be rendered still more valuable 
to the investigator by being provided with an entirely new and 
improved index, both of persons and of places. 

When it is considered that this index contains the names of 
more than 30,000 persons and about 8,000 places, the wide 
scope and great importance of these " Gleanings " will more than 
ever before be clearly recognized. 

The price will be $10.00 for the set of two volumes. If sent 
by mail, ;$io.50. 

Communications may be addressed and subscriptions sent to 

69 



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70 WATERS' GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Benjamin B. Torrey, Treasurer of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, No. 18 Somerset Street, Boston. 



Among the year books and rosters of the hereditary societies, 
most of which are excellent examples of society publications, is 
a, neat roster and by-laws of the Chicago Chapter, D. A. R., of 
which Mrs. R. H. Wiles is regent, and Mrs. Helen R. Gilbert, 
secretary. The membership of the Chapter is about 800. 



The Brewster-Bradford Company, whose advertisement appears 
in this issue, has recently published a neat and comprehensive 
catalogue of their specialties. 



In August of last year an organization of descendants of 
Daniel Hovey was formed at Ipswich, Mass. A committee was 
appointed to collect material for a genealogical history of the 
family. The association officers are : Rev. Horace C. Hovey, 
president, of Newbury port, Mass., and Lewis R. Hovey, secre- 
tary and treasurer, of Haverhill, Mass. 



The report that the publications of the Perkiomen Publishing 
Co., of Philadelphia, edited by Rev. Henry S. Dotterer, will be 
suspended, at least for a time, will be received with considerable 
regret by those who appreciate their value. 

"The Perkiomen Region, Past and Present," and " Historical 
Notes Relating to Pennsylvania Reformed Church," are the 
results of the almost unaided work of Mr. Dotterer. Students 
of Pennsylvania genealogy and local history will hope for a speedy 
resumption of these labors by Mr. Dotterer. 



"The Northern Genealogist," edited by A. Gibbons, F. S. A., 
is to be continued. While maintaining its general character as 
a storehouse of material for Family History, Mr. Gibbons 
intends to devote somewhat more attention than heretofore to 
actual Pedigrees, avoiding, hovfever, the danger of giving an 
abnormal quantity of space to any one family. It is also pro- 
posed to enliven the pages occasionally by Heraldic Illustrations, 



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Fac-slmiles of Seals, etc., but these only in the best style. By 
the use also of somewhat smaller type, and by otherwise econo- 
mizing space, it is intended to supply considerable more reading 
matter on a page than has hitherto been customary. The iVdaga- 
zine is to be published in Birmingham, Eng. 

British Records. 
The article by the editor in the last issue of the " Genealogi- 
cal Quarterly '* on "Records and Record Searching in England " 
has received many favorable notices. As the following letter 
from the well known antiquary, W. P. W. Phillimore, Esq., 
contains a correction or two of importance, it is printed entire : — 

**I have much pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of the December 
number of your Genealogical Quarterly with the interesting summary of 
English Searchini^. Two point? T would like to coniment upon — I doubt if 
any of the original Heraldic Visitations are in the British Museum. There 
are one or two which, having signatures to pedigree, appear to be original, 
but I fancy the official records are all at the Herald's College. On page 
i z^^ you refer as if doubtful, <Mt is said," — that there are seventeenth century 

inscriptions in Gloucestershire churchyards. There are plenty of them ; 
my own family has them as early as 1675, ^^^ ^ know of others much 
earlier." 

Two years ago Mr. Phillimore was kind enough to acknowl- 

I edge the receipt of the issue of the magazine containing " Notes 

I on Scottish Sources of Information Concerning American Fami- 

I lies Originating in Scotland," stating: — 

i **I have read your Scotch article with nrich pleasure — in some ways it 

t supplements my account and if I reprint I shall take some hints from it." 

I As both the articles in question were intended merely as aids 

to the American inquirer, especially those who had no knowledge 
of where and how to obtain information . which is frequently 
requested of the author, it is quite satisfactory to learn that the 
descriptions and directions were so sufficiently accurate as to ob- 
tain the commendation of one so well versed in British records 
as Mr. Phillimore. 



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The First Meeting Hquse at Salem, Mass. 
Nearly two years ago we announced that there was absolutely 
no ground upon which to rest the claim that the little shed in the 



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72 THE FIRST MEETING HOUSE OF SALEM, MASS. 

rear of the Essex Institute was the original church or a part 
thereof, or in any way was an indication of its size and structure. 
Those interested will recall the display of indignation, that any 
one should venture to deny what he accepted in toto, together 
with a mad attempt to divert public attention from the point at 
issue by the president of the society. A committee was finally 
appointed with instructions to report on the subject. We under- 
stand that several of the committee refused to serve or resigned. 
Recently two hundred dollars was appropriated to investigate the 
matter. One is tempted to suggest that the use of a two cent 
stamp forwarding a request to the city clerk for an attested copy 
of the record upon which the theory so long in vogue rests, would 
have been quite sufficient. However, if, as seems likely, this ap- 
propriation leads to the practical acquaintance of some of our 
Salem critics with the town records, it will have been expended to 
some advantage. It is a great pity that other historical societies 
are not as well equipped with funds as The Essex Institute. 

With the new building so long desired actually in sight, 
if only certain important interests can be brought into harmony, 
and a plentiful supply of funds, obtained from bequests made 
before the inauguration of the present regime, there is no reason 
why the Institute, close corporation and handicapped as it is, 
should not regain a part of its lost prestige. 

It is questionable if one third of the members of the society 
live in Salem or immediate vicinity, or in any way obtain any 
benefit from their membership. The writer suggested several 
years ago, that it was due members to receive either the Histori- 
cal Collections or the Bulletin of the society free. A sum less 
than that appropriated for the First Church investigation would 
be more than sufficient to meet the cost incurred by giving to 
each member a copy of the yearly volume of Collections. 



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EZRA BELLOWS OF LUNENBURG, MA55., AND SPRING- 
FIELD, VT., AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 



Supplementary to the Sketch on page 609 of the ** Bellows 

Genealogy," 1898. 



By Thomas Bellows Peck. 

439. Ezra3 Bhi.lows (^parentage unknoivn^ hut probably great- 
grajidson of Jsaac^ "John^ or Eleaxer and great-great-grandson of 
John Bellows^ of Aiarlhorough^ Alass.^ the emigrant^ was born 
^bout 1750. A declaration dated April 22, 1823, on file in the 
United States Bureau of Pensions, for increase of pension states 
that he was then 73 years of age. The place of his birth has ' 
not been ascertained. The first record found relating to him is 
in the church records of Lunenburg, Mass., and reads : " Ezra 
Bellows and Ruth, his wife, admitted to full communion Sept. 6, 
1778." Ruth's maiden name is known to have been Ruth Har- 
rington, but her parentage has not been ascertained. Ezra was 
a Revolutionary soldier and a pensioner, and probably enlisted at 
Lunenburg. The declaration on file in the United States Bureau 
of Pensions shows "that Ezra Bellows served in the Revolutionary 
War as a private in Capt. Simon Edgell's company. Col. Brew- 
er's regiment of Massachusetts troops, and that he was wounded at 
Mount Hope by receiving a charge of powder through his left 
hand."* 

The Massachusetts Revolutionary Rolls appear to contain no 
reference to Ezra Bellows as servino; in the war of the Revolution 
to the credit of that State. " No pay rolls of Capt. Edgell's 

* Letter of J. L. Davenport, acting Commissioner, Oct. 11, 1899. 

73 



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74 EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 

company for the particular service to which you refer is in the 
State's revolutionary rolls collection. A list of captains of com- 
panies raised in Worcester County to reinforce the army at Can- 
ada, and which marched under the command of Col. Daniel 
Brewer, August 27, 1776, contains the name of Capt. Edgell, 
and reports that twenty-nine men joined his company from differ- 
ent towns in Worcester County. The names of the individual 
soldiers, however, are not given."* 

It seems a fair inference that Ezra Bellows was one of these 
twenty-nine men whose names were not given. He received an 
invalid pension commencing June 20, 18 12, at the rate of ;$6o 
per annum. It was increased to ^96 per annum from April 24, 
18 16. At the time of the publication of pension rolls by Con- 
gress, in 1835 and '36 he had drawn $1,330.67. His original 
application for pension is not on file at the Bureau of Pensions, 
" owing to the fact that all the papers and nearly all the records 
pertaining to pensions and bounty lands issued by the govern- 
ment prior to 1814 were destroyed by the burning of the War 
Department buildings in that year and in i8oo."'j" 

The records of Lunenburg, Mass., give no information as to 
the parentage or previous residence of Ezra Bellows ; but the very 
complete genealogical records compiled by the late George A. 
Cunningham, of Lunenburg, from the town and church records 
and from other sources, contain references to all the available 
facts concerning his residence in that town, and, combined with 
the records of Springfield, Vt., and informatioh supplied by 
descendants, furnish materials for a tolerably complete historical 
sketch. His first wife, Ruth Harrington, died in Lunenburg, 
June 8, 1783, and was buried in the South Cemetery (Cunnmg- 
ham), but no gravestone has been found. He was married, 
second, April 8, 1784, by Rev. Zabdiei Adams, of Lunenburg, 
to Mehitable Giddings. She was probably, and in fact almost 



* Letter of Wm. M. Olln, Secretary of the Commonwealth, Jan. 30, 1900. 
j- Letter of J. L. Davenport. 



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EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 75 

certainly, daughter of Job and Mehltable Giddings, who accord- 
ing to Cunningham came from Ipswich, Mass., to Lunenburg in 

1786. Job Giddings was taxed in Lunenburg from 176 1 to 

1787, and died in 1786 or 1787. Either Mehitable preceded her 
father in Lunenourg or he moved there earlier than Cunningham 
says. Mehitable, A4argaret, Lucy, and Mary Giddings were 
baptized in Lunenburg, Sept. 7, 1783, adults supposed to have 
been born in Ipswich. John, Jr., EHzabeth, Sarah, and Hannah, 
children of Job and Mehitable Giddings, born in Ipswich, were 
baptized in Lunenburg, Dec. 17, 1786. 

Lunenburg records give the names of seven children of Ezra 
Bellows either born or baptized in Lunenburg ; four, Amasa, 
Elijah, Molly, and Betty by the first wife, and three, Ruth, 
Ezra, Jr., and Mehitable by the second wife. Mehitable was 
baptized Oct. 5, 1788, and it is probable that the family removed 
to Springfield, Windsor Co., Vt., soon after. Springfield land 
records show that Ezra Bellows, a husbandman, of Lunenburg, 
Mass., bought land in that town in 1788. 

Oct. 5, 1792, Ezra Bellows sold the remainder of his land in 
the 37th division in Springfield. This division was located near 
the corner made by the Connecticut River and the line of the 
town of Rockingham, where tradition places the Bellows family. 
In the declaration on file at the Bureau of Pensions dated at 
Springfield, April 22, 1823, Ezra Bellows says: "That accord- 
ing to my best recollection I have resided in Springfield for 
the space of twenty-nine years past and that previous thereto I 
resided in Lunenburg, Massachusetts." This places the date of 
removal about 1793, but it was probably four or five years earlier, 
or soon after the baptism of his daughter Mehitable. Little is 
known of the history of Ezra Bellows during his residence in 
Springfield, but he is presumed to have been a farmer. Family 
tradition says also that he w^as a bridge builder. His name would 
doubtless have been forgotten like countless others, if he had 
not been the father of fourteen children, thirteen of whom became 
heads of families. His descendants are scattered throughout the 



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76 EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 

' United States from New Hampshire to California, many of them 
bearing the name of Bellows. Many of them are unknown to 
each other and are brought together for the first time in this 
sketch, and many of them were not aware of their descent from 
the Springfield farmer until it was revealed by this inquiry. 
To them it would be a cause of great gratification if the link 
connecting Ezra Bellows with John Bellows, the emigrant, could 
be disco\'ered, but thus far all attempts to trace him back of his 
appearance in Lunenburg, Sept. 6, 1778, have failed. 

Ezra and Mehitable Bellows had seven children born after 
their removal to Springfield. The births of two, Daniel and 
Curtis, are recorded in the town records ; the dates of birth of 
two more, Simeon and Benjamin, have been furnished by their 
descendants ; John is said by his son, William M., to have been 
born in Springheld in 1787 or 1788; but the ages of the two 
'daughters, Sarah and Lucy, and their proper relative places in 
the family have not been ascertained. 

Ezra Bellows is stated by his grandson, Curtis H. Bellows, of 
Wilton, N. H., to have died in Springfield in the fall of 1827, but 
no record nor grave has been found. It is very likely that he 
was buried in the cemetery on " Parker Hill " in the southeast 
part of Springfield near his traditional home, but, if so, no stone 
was erected. An old residen': of that part of Springfield, George 
L. Cutler, states (1901) that there is a cellar hole on land 
adjoining his farm which marks the place where the Bellows 
family lived, but there have been no buildings there within his 
memory, which covers seventy-five years. He thinks they were 
the first settlers in that vicinity. 

The children of Ezra and Ruth (Harrington) Bellows were : — 

451. 1. Amasa,-* born in Lunenburg, Mass., Jan. 10, 1777 ; baptized 

there Sept. 6, 1778 ; died in Rockingham, Vt., Jan. 8, 1857. 
472. n. Emjah, baptized in Lunenburg, Sept. 6, 1778. 

IJl. Mary, born in Lunenburg, Dec. 21, 1778 ; baptized there Jan. 

24, 1779; married Samuel Lockwood, of Springfield, Vt., July 

16, 1813. 

IV. Elizabeth, born in Lunenburg, Dec. 17, 1780; baptized there 

Feb. 18, 1781 ; died unmarried. " Betsey Bellows " was. a 



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EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 77 

member of the Methodist Episcopal church in Springfield, Vt., 
. later than 1822. 

The children of Ezra and Mehitable (Giddlngs). Bellows 

were : — 

V. Ruth, baptized in Lunenburg, Nov. 14, 1784 ; married Samue 

Lockwood, Jan. 28, 1802, who afterwards married her sister 
' Mary. [For children see "History of Springfield, Vt."] 

VI. Ezra, baptized in Lunenburg, Sept. 10, 1786 ; was a tanner ; 

removed to McComb County, Michigan ; married and had 
children. His youngest son was named EdmundJ' 

VII. Mkhitabi.e, baptized in Lunenburg, Oct. 5, 1788 ; married in 

Springfield, Vt., Oct. 27, 1814, to David Taylor, of Spring- 
. field ; removed to Crystal Lake, 111. ; had three children, Dar- 
win^ Ziwd Daphue, twins, and Eliza, who married 

Pendleton and lived in Crystal Lake. 

473. VIII. John, horn in Springfield, Vt., in 1787 or 17SS; died in Cha- 

grin Falls, Ohio, April 2, 1856. 
IX. Sarah, born probably in Springfield, Vt. ; married Dec. 28, 1 820, 
to Bfttes Gill, son of John and Thankful (Bates) Gill, of 
Springfield. Their daughter, Mrs. Huson, was living in 
Chicago, 111., in 1899. 

474. X. Simeon, born July 3, 1792; died in Big Foot Prairie, 111., Feb. 

6, 1878. 

475. XI. Ben'JAMIN, born in Springfield, Vt., March 7, 1795; died in 

McComb County, Michigan, July 21, 1865. 

476. XII. Daniel, born in Rockingham, Vt., June 17, 1797 ; died in 

Springfield, Vt., April 26, 1833. 

XIII. Curtis, born in Springfield, Vt., I"eb. 23, 1800 ; kept a bote' 

in Elkhorn, Wis., in 1S44 ; died farther north in Wisconsin, 
later than 1848, leaving a widow but no children. He is 
remembered as having revisted his birthplace in Springfield, 
about fifty years since. 

XIV. Lucy, born probably in Springfield, Vt.; married Bull 

and lived in Crown Point, N. V.; is said to have been the 
youngest daughter. 

451. Amasa^ Bellows (^Ezra^^ 4390 ^^^ horn' in Lunen- 
burg, Mass., Jan. 10, 1777; removed with his parents to 
Springfield, Vt., about 1788, and died in Rockingham, Vt., Jan. 8, 
1857. ^^ ^^^ placed in the receiving tomb in Rockingham on 
his 80th birthday and was buried in Athens, Vt., by the side of 
his wife and daughter, Tryphena. He -removed from Springfield 
to Rockingham about 181 2, as the records of the latter town 
show that he was "warned out of town," Feb. 13, 181 2, as 



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78 EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 

was the custom of the time in the case of all new residents. He 
was married in Springfield, Nov. 12, 181 2, by John Davis, jus- 
tice of the peace, to Elizabeth Bailey. Both are described in the 
record as of Rockingham. He resided in Rockingham near the 
Springfield line. 

The births of six children (all except Curtis H., the fourth,) 
are recorded in Springfield. They were either born in Spring- 
field or were recorded there by preference, on account of business 
and family connection. 

Amasa and Elizabeth (Bailey) Bellows had seven children, as 
follows: — ^ : V .^^. .. , . 

I. Elizabeth, 5 born July 4, 1813; married in Springfield, May 23, 

1S39, to Relja Nichols, of Athens, Vt.; died in Putney, Vt., 
Feb. 24, 18S2, They had two children, Maria^ and Edwin 
both of whom died. 

II. Mary, born March 9, 1815; married in Springfield, Jan. 21, 

1841, to Orin Nichols, of Athens, Vt.; died in Iowa City, 
Iowa, Oct. 17, 1857; four children: I. John Milton, '^hoxn 
in Springfield, Vt., lives in Somerville, Mass. 2. Go? don, 
born in Athens, Vt., went west. 3. Sahin B., born in 
Athens, went west. 4. Ann, born in Athens, died young. 

III. Louisa, born Dec. 24, 1816; married in Springfield, April 19, 

1836, by Rev. Moses Chase, " Minister of Gospel," to Wil- 
liam R. Lynch, of Rockingham; died in Charlestown, Mass , 
Feb. 23, 1885. They lived in Rockingham and had two child- 
ren: I. A/<7r>',^ died in Charlestown, Mass. 2. William. 

IV. Curtis Harrington, born in Springfield, Vt., Feb. 10, 1819; 

married May 2, 1850, to Abigail Jane Sinionds, of Charles- 
town, Mass.; is a farmer in Wilton, N. H. He has no 
children. He has been of great assistance in securing.many 
of the facts in this sketch. 

V. TiRFHENAjborn in Rockingham, Vt., Aug. 30, 1821; died in 

Putney, Vt., Feb. 27, 1849, unmarried; buried in Athens, Vt. 

VI. William Mp:rrill, born in Springfield, Vt., Oct. 11, 1825; 

died in Brookline, Mass., March 1, 1894. (For record of 
children see " Bellows Genealogy," p. 616.) - ' 

VII. CHAkLP:s Franklin, born in Rockingham, Vt., Dec. 14, 1827; 

died in P>rookline, Mass., Jan. 7, 1896. (For record of child- 
ren see " Bellcws Genealogy," pp. 616 and 617.) 

472. Elijak-* Bellows (^zr^,^ 439,) was baptized in Lunen- 
burg, Mass., Sept. 6, 1778; removed to Springfield, Vt., with 






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EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 79 

his parents ; resided in Rockingham and Springfield. " May 30, 
1801, Elijah Bellows is of and belongeth to the Universalist 
Society in this town, and contributes to the support of the same." 
(Town Records of Rockingham). He was married, first, in 
Rockingham, Sept. 3, 1798, to Lovice White, daughter of Asa 
White, of Rockingham. A stone in the old cemetery in Rock- 
ingham is inscribed : " In Aiemory of Two Infants^ a Son and a 
Daughter of Elijah Iff Lovha Belloivs^ they Died March ith^ 
//pp." Elijah and Lovisa Bellows had also two children, 
^uartus^^ who was a sailor and resided in New Bedford, Mass., 
and Eveline^ of whom no further record has been found. 

Elijah Bellows was married, second, in Springfield, Vt., April 

1, 1821, bv M. A. Powers, justice of the peace, to Sarah Olney. 
Both are described in the record as of Springfield. They had 
one child, Charles 6'.,5 born in Springfield, May 19, 1823, ^'^^ 
removed to the West. No further record of him has been found. 

473. John-* Bellows (Ezra^^ 439?) ^^s born in Springfield, 
Vt., in 1787 or 1788. He removed to Bloomfield, Trumbull 
Co., Ohio, in 1817; and died in Chagrin Falls, O., April 

2, 1856. Before removing to Ohio, he married Harlow, 

widow of Josiah Harlow. They had two children : — 

I. William Munroe,'^ born June i, 1818, in North Bloomfield, 

Trumbull Co., O. He now resides in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. 
He was married March 5, 1851, to Mary Ann Stafford. They 
have four children: i. yames Jl/.,*^ born in 1852; married 
C. T. McClintic and resides in Chagrin Falls, O. No child- 
ren. 2. Rachel Helen y born in 1S55; married G. K. Bent- 
ley and resides in Cleveland, O. Ch : i. Jennie Belle, ^ 
born March 27, 1S79; ii. Helen Ruth, born Feb. 15, 1892. 
3. Charles Curtis^ born Feb. 3, 1857; drowned at Chagrin 
Falls, in 1866. 4. Thomas Payne, born May 26, i860; 
married Jan. 26, 1887, Nura Tucker, of Chagrin Falls and 
rcfides in Cleveland, O. Child, Helen Margarite,"" born Oct. 
5, 1891. 

II. CuKTis J(jnN, born June 7, 1820, in Warren, Trumbull Co., 

O.; died May 20, 1882, in Fayette, Mich. He was a phy- 
sician and surgeon in the Civil War. He married Catherine 
Scot and had two children, both of whom died unmarried. 

474. Simeon'* Bellows (^zr^, 439,) was born probably in 



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EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 



Springfield, Vt., July 3, 1792, and died in Big Foot Prairie, 111., 
Feb. 6, 1878. He was a clothier and carder in Chateaugay, N. Y., 
until 1844, after which he was a farmer in Big Foot Prairie, 
McHenry Co., Illinois. He was married in Chateaugay, Sept. 8, 
1822, to Celinda Wyllys, who was born in Franklin County, New 
York, July 6, 1806, and died in Big Foot Prairie, Feb. 3, 1887, 
where both Simeon Bellows and his wife were buried. They 
had twelve children, as follows : — 

I. Matilda,^ born Oct. 5, 1823 ; died Jan. 20, 189S ; married in 

Chateaugay, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1843,10 Lorenzo Harum Dunton, 
M. D., eldest child of Thomas and Waity (Kent) Dunton. 
They resided in Stockholm Depot, (now Winthrop) N. Y., 
where Dr. Dunton kept a hotel. They had one child, Amelia 
Alaliliia,'^ boin at Brasher Jballs, N. Y., July i, 1844; married 
at Stockholm Depot, June 23, 1869, to John Gilbert Mclntyre, 
who died at Long Beach, Cal., March 13, 1S99, and was 
buried in Potsdam, N. Y. Mr. Mclntyre was a practicing 
lawyer in Potsdam, where they resided. 

II. JLUCY, born July 15, 1825; died May 8, 1847; married in Chat- 

eaugay, N. Y., March 8, 1843, to Horace Bromley. They 
removed to Wisconsin and resided there until her death. 
They had one child, Milton," born March 3, 1S44. 

III. Simon, born April 21, 1827; married in Michigan, Nov. 11, 

1857, to Hannah Parker. He was a farmer in Dakota City, 
Iowa, till November, 1892, when they removed to Long 
Beach, Cal., where they now reside. Children: i. Frank 
/\,^ born Oct. 6, '858; married Nellie Brown; is a farmer and 
dealer in farm implements in Humboldt, Iowa. 2. Lucy A., 
born April 16, 1861 ; died June 10, 1884; married Dec. 4, 
1SS3, in Algona, Iowa, to Edwin D. Harvey, of Humboldt, 
Iowa, where they lived for a short time, and then removed to 
Lemars, Iowa, where she died. 3. Barton O., born March 
21, 1864;. married in Fort Dodge, Iowa, to Ada Johnson ; is 
a farmer in Dakota City, Iowa. 4. Bridie, born Jan. 28, 
1867; married in Long Beach, Cal., Nov., 1897,10 Bertha 
Truax ; is a farmer in Dakota City, Iowa. 5. Mignonette, 
born Feb. 20, 1S70 ; married in Long Beach, Cal., Dec. 
^-*«. 16, 1896, to Milo Cook, of Los Angeles, Cal., where they 

"<■ now reside. They have one child, Alice Winifred,' born 

in Long Beach, Oct. 14, 1897. 6. Alusa, .born May 20, 
1873; married in Long Beach, Cal., Dec. 25, 1S98, to Frank 
L. Wingard, a druggist in Long Beach, where they now 
reside. 7. Cyrus, born Sept. 21, 1876. 



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EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 8i 

IV. Laura, born June 15, 1829; married in Algona, Iowa, Aug. 

25, 1859, to George Washington Mann, son of Nathan Miles 
and Sallie Dustin Mann, who wasbcrninErie County, N.Y., 
Nov. I, i82'9, and died in Irvington, Iowa, Dec. 20, 1884. 
After marriage they lived for several years in Humboldt 
County, Iowa, where Mr. Mann was a teacher and farmer, 
and after 1S6-}. in Irvington, Iowa, where he was a farmer. 
Mrs. Mann still resides in Irvington. They had five child- 
ren, all of whom are unmarried: I. Viola,^ born June 25, 
i860; is a school-teacher in Irvington. 2. Nathan Ali'es, 
born Nov. 28, 1861 ; is a farmer in Irvington. 3. Horace , 
born June 19, 1863; has been a school-teacher; was in the 
employment of the government in Washington, D. C, for 
five years, and is now a student of social problems in Chicago 
and other cities. 4. Alice, born March i, 1865; isaschool- 
teacher in Potsdam, N. V., (1899) and has farming interests 
in Irvington, Iowa. She has collected and furnished the 
facts in regard to her grandfather, Simeon Bellows, and his 
descendants. 5. Bertha, born Feb. 14, 1868; is a trained 
nurse and resides in Irvington. 

V. Curtis, born June iS, 1S31; engaged in mining in California 

and was killed by Indians in a canon near Independence, 
Inyo Co., Cal., March 3, 1863. 

VI. Horace, born July 29, 1833 '•> ^"'Cnt to California many years ago 

and was engaged in mining for several years. He owns a 
goat ranch in Olancha, Inyo Co., Cal.; is unmarried. 

VII. CvRUs, born Sept. 4, 1835; died of typhoid fever at his home 

in Big Foot Prairie, 111. 

VIII. Mii.TON, born Sept. 27, 1837; died in Chateaugay, N. Y., 

April 3, 1S41, 

IX. LvNDEN, born June 2f, 1S39; died in Chateaugay, N. Y., 

April I, 1841. 

X. Viola, born June 12, 1842; married in Big Foot Prairie, 111,, 

Oct. 28, 1875, to I^""- f^- G- Forbush, of Algona, la. They 
resided in Algona, Iowa, where he was engaged in the drug 
business, until October, 1887, when they removed to Pomona, 
Cal., where they now live and where he has a lemon and 
orange ranch. Mrs. Forbush's recollections of her father's 
brothers and sisters and their families have been conclusive 
proof of Simeon Bellows' parentage, which was unknown to 
his descendants, and have supplied many facts as to other 
branches of Ezra Bellows' family. 

XI. Edwin, bcjrn .Aug. 24, 1844; enlisted in the Union army and 

served in Tennessee, where he died July 31, 1863, and 
where he was buried. 



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82 EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 

-XII. Ann, born Sept. 18, 1846; married in Kig Foot Prairie, 111., 
Sept. I, 1873, ^o John Gaffney, of that town. They resided 
there till March, 1S89, when they removed to Irvington, la., 
where they still reside and where he is engaged in farming. 
Their children are : l. A/a ry,^ horn Dec. ^, 1874; mtrried 
March 29, 1899, to George Bradley, a farmer, of Titonka, 
Iowa. 2. Grace^ born Dec. 17, 1876; a school-teacher. 3. 
Simon, born April 8, 1879. 4. Anabel, born June 21, 18S2. 
5. yohn Dunton, hoxn October 5, 18S5. 6. Robert, born 
April 23, 1887. 

475. Benjamin'' Bellows, (Ezra^^ 439^ ^^'^^ born in Spring- 
field, Vt., March 7, 1795, and died on a farm in McComb 
County, Michigan, July 21, 1865. ^^ moved to Bloomfleld, 
Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 18 17, with his elder brother, John. 
He was married, first, to Mary Ann Harlow, daughter of his 
brother John's wife by her first husband, Josiah Harlow, and 
by her had seven children as below. He was married, second, 
in Aurora, O., Jan. 28, 1841, to Mehitable C. Cooley. They 
had two children, born in Aurora: i. Sarah T.y> born Nov. 15, 
1841 ; 2. Thomas Exra^hovn May 3, 1843. 

Benjamin and Alary Ann (Harlow) Bellows had seven child- 
ren of some of whom little has been ascertained. The child- 



ren were :- 



J(»sfAH Harlow,''' born in Bloomficld, Ohio, Nov, 3, 1819; died 
in Weeping Wster, Neb., Aug. i, 1858 ; married May 24, 
1848, to Celestia A. Mills, Children: 1. Mary Ann,*" horn 
March 16, 1849; married in Weeping Water, Neb., Nov, 11, 
1865, to Eugene L. Reed, who was killed in a mining acci- 
dent in Black Hawk, Col,, in 1894. She lives with her 
daughter, Lucile, in Oi)erlin, Ohio. Children : i. Will E ,'' 
born March 6, 1867; is a missionary at Quito, Ecuador. He 
was married in Cleveland, O., Jan. 21, 1892, to Mary Slade. 
They have one child, Albert, ** born July 2, 1895 '■> "• Stella, 
born Jan. I, 1870 ; resides in Atlantic, Iowa; iii. Herman, 
born Sept. 23, 1872, died in infancy ; iv. Clinton, born Oct. 
3, 1874, is a missionary at Tangiers, Morocco; v. Lucile, born 
Sept. 21, 1882. 2. Benja7nin Franklin, born March ^7, 
1851, graduated from Oberlin College, O., in 1874; resides in 
Cleveland, O. He is the inventor of the " Bellows Electric 
Compositor" a patented machine for typesetting by elec- 
tricity, which is manufactured by the Electric Compositor 



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EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 83 

Company, of Cleveland; married, Aug. 3, 1881, to Nellie 
Dickey. They have three children, all born in Cleveland : 
i. Marie,"' born Dec. 7, 18S2; ii. Virgil, born Dec. 15, 1886; 
iii. Evelyn, born March 12, 1S95. 3. Frederick, born Dec. 
13, 1852 ; graduated from Oberlin Colk^ge in 1879 ; resides 
in Toledo, O.; married, first, June 25, 1880, to Florence J. 
Crum, who died in 1892, and second, in Worcester, Mass., 
Sept. 3, 1895, to Inez F. Barrows. He has had six children 
by the first wife, all born in Weeping Water, Neb. : i. Anna 
Celestia,* born Aug. 16, 1S81 ; a school-teacher near Norfolk, 
Neb.; ii. Jennie Louise, born July 10, 18S3 ; iii. Lucius A., 
born Sept. 8, 1S85, died .April 25, 1886; iv. Fred H., born 
Feb. 25, 1S87, died Oct. i, 1898; v. Eugene F., born June I, 
1889 ; vi. Morence J., born Dec. 2, 1891. 4. J^osa, born 
Jan. 27, 1855, died Dec. 22, 1857. 5. Josiah Harlo7v, born 
in Weeping Water, Neb., Oct. 17, 1858; graduated from 
Obcilin College in iSSi; resivlcs in Toledo, O., where he is 
engaged in the real estate business. He has collected nearly 
all the facts Contained in this sketch as to the families of John 
and Benjamin Bellows. He was married in Elyria, O., Dec. 
21, 18S1, to Lucina G. Brush. They have had four children: 
i. Sidney F.," born in Weeping Water, Neb., Oct. 21, 1882' 
now (1901) in college in Obeilin, O.; ii. Ruth, born Dec. 
18, 1888, died Jan. 31, 1889 ; iii. Bertram Brush, born in. 
Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 27, 1890 ; iv. Marjorie Harlow, born 
in Toledo, O , Aug. 12, 1899. 

n. James Simkcn, born in Bloomiicld, O., Oct. 3, 1821. The 
time and place of his death have not been learned; he died 
unmairied. 

III. Daniel, bom in Mesopotamia, O , Jan. 3, 1824; was in the 

Confederate service. No further record has been obtained. 

IV. Maky, born in Bloomfield, O., Feb. 2, 1826. No further rec- 

ord has bee^i obtained. 

V. Miranda, born in Bloomrleld, O., April 24, 1829. No further 

record has been obtained. 

VI. Benjamin, born in Bloomfield, O., Oct. 15, 1831; died at 

Britton Station, Mich., March 4, 18S7. He served in the 
Union .Army during the War of the Rebellion in Company 
M, 8th Michigan Cavalry. He was married in East Claridon' 
O., Nov. 10, 1 85 1, to Almira Carlton. Their children were : 
I. IVilliam AlonzOy'^ born Oct. 11, 1852; died Sept. 5, 1892; 
married April 20, 18S1, to Frances P. Stout; Children: i. 
Harry S.,' born April 4, 1882; died Oct. 21, 1892. ii. 
Ethel, born Jan. 4, 1884. 2. George Spenser, hoxnm Rock- 
port, 111., Sept. 15, 1854; no further record. 3. Ida Afay^ 



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84 EZRA BELLOWS AND DESCENDANTS. 

born in Sylvania O., March 4, 1857; died in Halverton, O., 
April 3, 1872. 4. E^ffie, died in infancy. 
VII. Alonzo, born in Bloomfield, O., June 4, 1S36; married in Har- 
risburg, Pa., Oct. 3, 1864, to Susan S. Johns; died in the Sol- 
diers' Home in Illinois Feb. 21 , 1898. He served in the Union 
army during the Rebellion, as corporal in Company B, Fourth 
Michigan Vol. Inf. ; was mustered in June, 1861; mustered 
out June, 1S64. He was noted for his beautiful penmanship. 
His children were: i. Nelson M.,^ hoin in Detroit, Mich., 
July 20, 1865; married in Beloit, Wis., to Fanny Thorn; 
resides in Nampa, Idaho. Two children born in Durand, III. 
i. Brownie,'' born Septeml)er, 1892. ii. Claire, born July, 
1894. 2. Gtiy Johns, born in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 13, 
1867; died in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 14, 1875. 3. Mary 
Ceiesda, born in Painesville, O., Jan. 15, 1874; died in 
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 26, 1875. 4- ^^cirgaret II., born in 
Camden, N. J., Feb. 10, 1878; is a teacher in Davis, 111. 5. 
- Alonzo C.y born in Durand, 111., Feb. 3, 1S80; is learning 
sculpture at Granite Heights, Wis. 6. Ralph, born in 
Gratiot, Wis., Jan. 28, 1884; a meml)er of the class of igoi 
in the High School in Davis, 111., where his mother, Mrs. 
Susan S. Bellows, now (1901) resides. 

476. Daniel^ Bellows (£zr^,3 439,) was born in Rockingham, 
Vt., June'i 7, 1797; <^ted in Springfield, Vt., April 26, 1833, 
and was buried in the village cemetery, where his grave and 
those of his"' sons, Hiram IV. and Henry C, are marked by 
stones.* He married Lucy Woods, who survived him. She 
was a member'of the Congregationalist Church in Springfield and 
was dismissed and recommended to the Methodist Church, Jan. 
26, 1836. The record of their children is imperfect. As far 
as known, they were : — 

I. Laura F."^; married in Springfield, Vt., Oct. 25, 1838, to Lewis 
W. Harlow, both described as of Springfield. They removed 
to Rutland, Vt. One child, " Henrietta, dau. of L. W. and 
Laura B. Harlow, [who] died Sept. 18, 1S48, aged 5 years 2 

h mos.," is buried in Springfield in the lot next to the Daniel 

P. Bellows lot. - - 

II. Hiram W., "died Jan. 23.,- 1848, ?et. 25 yrs." 

III. Henry C, *' died Nov. 25, 1844, net. 21 yrs." 

IV. George, resided at Spirit Lake, Iowa; died, leaving a widow 
and several children. 

V. John ( ?) no record. 
VI. Danikl, lived at Spirit Lake, Iowa. 

' VII. EMn.v Jane, twice married; no children; removed to the 
West and died in Pecatonica, III. 
VIII. Davuj, born soon after his father's death in 1833; resided in 
Long Beach, Cal., for a year and was accidentally killed in 
Los .-\ngeles, Cal.; was unmarried. 



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THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS AND ITS 

SIGNIFICANCE.* 

By William DeWitt Hyde, D. D., LL. D., 

President of Bowdoin College. 



Some years ago I received a petition from the supporters of a 
country academy, iu which the petitioners set forth the fact that 
the academy was declining, and needed something to bring it 
into prominence. They had finally concluded that the best 
thing they could do for the academy would be to secure an honor- 
ary degree for the principal. Accordingly they petitioned the 
trustees and overseers of Bowdoin College to grant to their 
principal the degree of LL. D. In order to make more explicit 
the precise thing they wanted, they added in brackets, after the 
le;tters LL. D., the explanatory clause, "Doctor of Legal Laws." 
The Bowdoin trustees did not see their way clear to helping out 
the academy in the manner proposed b}' the petitioners. Never- 
theless, the candidate did not remain long unconsoled ; for at that 
same commencement season, a Vv'eek later, he received from a 
sister university the degree of Ph. D., which, doubtless, both 
he and his supporters regarded " equall}' as good." 

While historically the degree of LL. D. undoubtedly goes 
back to the time when it represented suflicient attainments in 
jurisprudence to entitle the recipient to receive a doctorate of 
"Legal Laws," it long since ceased to have direct connec- 
tion with it, and has come to signify proficiency in law in a 
broader and profoundcr sense. Whoever has reflected deeply 
on nature and human life has discovered that underneath 



^Reprinted by permission from *< The Boston Transcript." 

85 



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86 DEGREE OF LL.D. AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE. 

phenomena there are certain spiritual principles, of which all 
phenomena are expressions. These deeper principles Plato 
called " ideas" ; the Hebrew proverbs grouped them together, 
under the single name of " wisdom." 

*' I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever 
the earth was. When there were no deptlis, I was brought 
forth ; when there were no fountains abounding with water. 
Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought 
forth." 

*'By me kings reign, and princes decree justice. By me 
princes rule, and nobles, even all the judges of the earth." 

The modern world, however, has agreed to call these prin- 
ciples, whether in the sphere of nature or of human society, by 
the name of laws. The Doctor of Laws, therefore, is a person 
in whose speech or action these laws have come to clear and 
definite expression. Such persons are comparatively rare. The 
majority of college graduates never get beyond that acquaintance 
with truth which comes throuofh the thought and deed of others. 
They never attain original insight and independent initiative. 
They deserve merely the Bachelor's Degree, which signifies that 
they have apprehended the laws of nature and human life at 
second hand. Ori^rinallv this Bachelor's Degree carried with it 
the right of teaching from a text-book, but not the right to teach 
out of the accumulated stores of one's own information. 

The Master's Degree implied longer study and closer famil- 
iarity with a subject, and carried with it the right to give lec- 
tures of one's own. With us the Degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy has come to mark this stage of intellectual independence, 
and the corresponding authority to teach. The Degree of Doctor 
of Laws marks not merely the ability to make some little con- 
tribution to the sum of human knowledge, and on the basis of 
the ability shown in doing that to give lectures on a subject, but 
has been reserved to indicate some substantial contribution either 
to science, if one is preeminently a scholar, or to public welfare, 
if one is a man of aOairs. Such achievement obviously cannot 
be measured by a formal examination, for it may well happen 
that the recipient of a degree is more competent to examine the 
body which confers it, than is the body to examine him. A man 



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DEGREE OF LL.D. AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE. 87 

proves his worthiness to receive this degree hy the ncceptance 
of his work among those who are competent to judge. His 
investigations if he is a scientist, his researches if he is a historian, 
his writings if he is a literary man, his decisions if he is a judge, 
his achievements if he is a statesman, are the basis on which the 
degree is conferred. Membership in learned societies and offi- 
cial position in the State may be indications of fitness for this 
degree, but they are merely indications. The real basis on 
which the degree rests is the fact that some department of human 
knowlege, or of human affairs, has come to individual expres- 
sion throug-h this man's words or deeds. There are certain 
high positions, such as that of president of one of the leading 
universities, or the head of a department in such a university; 
such as the president or prime minister of n great nation ; or the 
chief justice of the Supreme Court of a nation or a great State, 
which it is almost inconceivable that a man should hold without 
having proved himself to the public as a man through whom the 
laws of nature or of human society have found expression. Ex- 
ceptions, indeed, there may be to this ride ; in the case of General 
Butler the degree was properly with, held. Yet even in such 
extreme cases the valid ground for withholding it is not that the 
authorities of the universities differ from the policy of the man 
who holds the important office, but rather that they judge him 
to have no principle or policy at all. 

Difference of opinion is no ground for withholding a degree, 
for the laws which govern nature and human life are many and 
subtle. No individual is likely to grasp them all in due propor- 
tion. The question which a board of trustees must ask with 
reference, to a candidate for the Degree of Doctor of Laws is 
not whether they approve his opinions and policy. It is the 
deeper question whether his opinions are the result of scholarly 
thought ; whether his policy is the fruit of intelligent and con- 
scientious action. John C. Calhoun and Daniel Webster held 
very different opinions; yet each of them had reached his opin- 
ions by a careful study of history and political science, and each 
was able to commend his opinions by scholarly and able argu- 
ment. Both of these men, in their day, were worthy of the 
highest academic honor. In the same way, Darwin and Agas- 



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DEGREE OF LL.D. AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE. 



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siz differed as to the principles of classification of species ; but 
both had reached their conchisions through patient and laborious 
investigation. Both were worthy of the doctorate of laws. 
Professor Muller and Professor Whitney differed respecting the 
origin of language ; but both were men through whom the sci- 
ence of philology was carried forward. In our own day certain 
. groups of laws have pointed in the direction of free trade ; other 
groups of laws have pointed in the direction of a high protective 
tariff. One group of laws has pointed toward the enlarge- 
ment of the volume of our currency ; another group of laws has 
pointed to the maintenance of a gold standard as the condition 
of our economic prosperity. Still more recently one group of 
historic precedents and principles points toward the limitation of 
the territory of the United States to this continent ; another 
group of tendencies and ideals points to the expansion of the 
country as the condition of our highest national influence and 
prosperity. Whoever has apprehended either of these groups 
of laws, and is able to give them their historic and philosophic 
se^tting ; still more, whoever has been able to make either of 
these groups of principles effective in the determination of 
national policy is justly entitled to the honor of the Degree of Doc- 
tor of Laws. If agreement with the opinions of a man is to be 
the test of fitness for an honorary degree, the sooner college and 
university authorities cease to confer such degrees the better ; for 
the inevitable outcome of granting degrees on such a basis would 
be not to crown scholars and men of action with the deliberate 
approval of learned bodies, but to bring the strife and jealousy 
and animosity of the market-place and the lobby into our aca- 
demic halls. 

Tlie first man to receive the degree of LL.D. from Harvard 
College, was George Washington, who received the degree in 
1776, at a time when there was no little difference of opinion as 
to the merits of the position which he occupied. The proper 
disregard of opinion as a basis for a degree has been happily 
illustrated in recent years in the college with which I am con- 
nected. The policy of Senator Hale just before the outbreak of 
the Spanish War was even less popular with the rank and file 
of Maine Republicans than has been that of Senator Hoar with 



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DEGREE OF LL.D. AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE. 89 

the administration Republicans of Massachusetts. Yet, although 
-probably at the same time a considerable majority of the trustees 
and overseers ot Bowdoin College were not in personal sym- 
pathy with the attitude taken by Senator Hale, they seized thiit 
very time as most appropriate for conferring upon him the degree 
of LL.D. For he was at one time the most conspicuous exam- 
ple of a man who was maintaining a difficult and prominent 
public position with ability, and courage, and conscientiousness. 
Last year, although the trustees and overseers of Bowdoin Col- 
lege include scarcely half a dozen Unitarians among their fifty 
or more members, yet they recognized the great service to relig- 
ious thought which Unitarianism has rendered ; and took the 
opportunity to confer the degree of Doctor of Divinity upon the 
president of the American Unitarian Association, who is doing- 
so much to conserve and increase the effectiveness of Unitarian 
influence in the community. 

So much is the true significance of honorary academic degrees. 
The newspaper discussion of the fitness of particular individuals 
to receive such a degree is discourteous to the individuals con- 
cerned ; and most of it is as wide of the mark as was the ignor- 
ant attempt of the petitioners above referred to, to define tlie 
significance of the two Ls in the LL.D. 



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^ NICHOLS=Mc\VAIN. 

Jonathan Nichols and Alary McWain, both of Bolton, mar- 
ried Jan. 16, 1753. 

Daniel Nichols and Mary Houghton, both of Bolton, married 
Dec. 5, 1754. - 

Samuel Nichols and Abigail Pearce, both of Bolton, married 
Dec. 26, 1779. 

Names of children born to Jonathan and IVIary Nichoalls. 

Jonathan, horn July 2^ 1754. 
Josiah, born June 30, 1756. 
Andrew, born June. 175S. 
Susanna, born N[ay i. i7rK). 
Lois, born Sept. 5. 1762. 
Francis, born Jan. 16, 1765. 

Daniel and Mary Nichols had 

Becke, born Dec. 30. 175^). 

Andrew and Hezediah Mac Wain had 

Mary, born April 6, 1735. 

jane, born June 7. 1737. 

John, born Sept. 8, 1739. 

Andrew, born June 8, 1742. 

James, born Nov. ^. 1744. 

Kezadiah, born 1746 7. "- 

William, born Nov. iS, 1749. 

David, born Dec. 5. 1751. 

Lydia, born Aug. 25. 1754. 

Information wanted as to origin of either Nichols or McWain 

family ; where they came from to Bolton ; where they were in 

1830, and where they scattered to when they left Bolton, Mass. 

E. P. Simpson, 1038 Jackson Block, Chicago, Ills. 

McWaix, Andrew and Hezediah, lived in Bolton, Mass., and 
had eight children there after 1730, and removed to either 
Lyme, N. H., or Thetford, Vt. Where are they buried and 
who were their ancestors.' It is thoui^ht they were vScotch, conir 
intr by way of Ireland to Massachusetts. 

Nichols. Who were the ancestors of Jonathan Nichols, of 
Thetford, Vt., whose father, Jonathan, lived in Bolton, Mass., 
and married Mary McWain there in 17S3? Jonathan, Jr., had 
several brothers and sisters, all born in Bolton, where his father 
lived from 1750 to 1765. Where is Jonathan, Sr., buried and 
who were his parents, and where did they live.'' 



90 






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THE PAWNEE REPUBLIC. 

Xhe Legislature of Kansas appropriated 33,000 to fence and 
mark the site of the Pawnee Republic, in Republic County, where 
Lieut. Zebulon M. Pike, on the 29th day of September, 1806, 
first asserted and enforced national sovereignty over the territory 
now known as Kansas. The visible remains of the Indian 
village will be enclosed by a substantial iron fence, built by the 
Capital Iron Works, of Topeka, and an elegant shaft of Barre 
granite, twenty-five feet high, erected by C. W. Gould, of 
Topeka. The land was presented to the state of Kansas by 
Elizabeth A. Johnson, and the Legislature acceded to her request 
to fence and mark the same, without a dissenting vote in either 
house. The State Historical Society is charged with the care of 
this propert\', and also the duty of carrying out the purpose of 
the Legislature with appropriate ceremonies. On the anniver- 
sary of Pike's visit to this inspiring spot, September 29 next, the 
monument will be unveiled, with a programme as full and interest- 
ing as that for luly 4, participated in by the Daughters of 
the Revolution and the Grand Arm\' of the Republic. The 
inscription on the monument will read : — 

Erected by tlie State of Kansas, 

1901, 

To mark the site of the Pawnee Republic, where 

Lieut. Zebulon \L Pike 

caused the Spanish Hag to be lowered, 

and the flag of the United States to be raised, 

September 2q, 1806. 

The location of this Indian village site, now assumed by the state 
of Kansas as the exact place where the heroic and inspiring deed 
of Pike was enacted, is ten miles from Courtland, and five miles 
from Republic. 

91 



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THE HISTORY OF flALDEN, riAS5., 1633=1785.* 

For nearly half a century Mr. Corey gathered materials for 
a history of Tvlaklen, and this volume is but a partial result 
of his labor, for a companion volume is promised, a volume 
which shall not only touch upon the modern history of -the 
town, but contain genealogies of the old families. 

"Mystic Side" was the home of John Greenland in 1640, 
and probably of others, but to Joseph Hills, his son-in-law 
John W^ayte, and Thomas Ruck, all fiom Maldon in England, 
who came to New England in 163S and were among the early 
owners of land on Mystic Side, is probably due the name of 
the town. 

John Oldham, adventurer and trader, claimed the lands on 
Mystic Side in 1629, by virtue of a lease from Robert Georges, 
and his claim was a matter ot some concern to the Massachu- 
setts Company. The lands belonging to Charlestown north of the 
Mystic were loosely defined in 1633 by the General Court, and 
in the following year a division of territory, then first st3'led 
Mystic Side, took place. The great allotment was made in 163S, 
and a ferry established in 1640. From this time settlement on 
Mystic Side became more in favor, and in 1649 the General 
Court established the plantation as Maiden. 

The history of a town falls into, several divisions, as relatingto 
church, commonlands, town proceedings, schools, military his- 
tory, etc., and each of these has been treated with a due 
appreciation of its proper importance. The frequent and 
lengthy but pertinent abstracts from ancient records serve 
to render the book of more than usual value, and, through- 






* The History of Maiden, Mass., 1633-1785. By Deloraine P. Corey, Mai- 
den, 1S99. Pul^lished by t'tie author. Svo., cloth, pp. 870: illustrated. 



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THE HISTORY OF MALDEN, MASS., 1633-1785. 



93 



out, the liberal space given to descriptions of individuals and the 
motives which actuated them, gives the history a vivacity and 
interest which is rarely found in books of this class. The 
unstinted use of notes, abounding with genealogical detail make 
up what seems at first a great loss, the lack of a connected 
statement of the family' connections. So, too, the wn'lliugness 
to enlarge upon the history of the town's and townspeople's con- 
nection with neighboring towns has made this history of Maiden 
an invaluable supplement to the earlier histories of Medford, 
Woburn, Lynn, and Charlestown. The earlier chapters are 
replete with information pertaining to Maldon, England, the first 
beginnings of settlement in New England, of the Indians and 
their treatment by the settlers. One cannot close this very 
inadequate notice of this excellent work without a word of praise 
for the illustrations and the typograpiiy of the volume. 



WILLIAH JOINER. 

Walpole, N. H., church records furnish partial answer to 
query in April number, p. 14, in regard to William Joiner. 

William Joiner and Hannah Joiner from Ashburnham were 
admitted to the church Feb. i, 1778- This William was 
evidently the one who married Hannah Bowker at Sudbury, 
March 18, 1745, and removed to Ashburnham. He coul^i not 
have been the father of Salmon, born in Royalton, Vt., Sept. 26, 
I777> ^y ^ second wife Paulina, as his wife Hannah was living 
in 1778. He may have been father of William and grandfather 
of Salmon. He does not appear again in Walpole church rec- 
ords. 

William Joyner, of Walpole, served at the battle of Bunker 
Hill in Capt. Jeremiah Stiles's company (N. H. State Papers, 
Vol. 15, p. 741). Which William was this, father or son ? 

T. B. P. 



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BROOKS=ROBERTS. 

Brooks. Who was tlie father of Samuel Brooks whose son, 
John Warner Brooks, married Sarah Roberts and had a son, 
Judson Brooks, born in Connecticut, and huge family after- 
wards, all born in vSteuben, N. Y. ? 

Sarah Roberts Brooks died in Steuben Co., New York, Aug^. 
5, 185:. Where was she born? Who were her parents? She 
married John Warner Brooks, who was born April 22, 1775- 
Sarah Roberts was born Sept. 2^, 1774. John Warner Brooks 
died in Steuben, Jan. 26, 1S30. - 

Roberts. Who were the parents of Sarah Roberts, who 
married John Warner Brooks in Connecticut, about 1796, and 
had Judson, Elizal:»eth, Electa, Selina, Phoebe, Jolm, Warner, 
Lansing, Sarah, Minerva, and Sophia? The first son only was 
born in Connecticut, the others in Steuben, N. Y. 

G. P. S. 



Wanted — Ancestry of 

1. Mary Bartlctt, who married Nathaniel Norton, of Suffield, 
Conn., Jan. 8, 1729. 

2. John Warner, married Dec. 25, 1754, Margaret Loomis, 
of Windsor, Conn. 

3. Elizabeth Strickland, married July 6, 17 10, Williarn 
Stoughton, of Windsor, Conn. 

4. Benjamin Wright, of Chicopec, Mass. His daughter 
Rachel married Nov. 29, 1750, Jabez Hancock. 

5. Lydia Wilmot, married May 3, 1784, Daniel Candee, of 
Oxford, Conn. 

6. Rachel Harris, of Kingsbury, N. Y., married 

Hawkins about 1776. H. 

94 



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SOME ANCESTRAL LINE. S OF 
CHARLES ALLEN CONVERSE.* 

Admitted to membership in the Society of Colonial 
Wars, In the State of Vermont, 22 Feb., 1895, i^ right 
of descent from Edward Convers, of Woburn, Mass. 

Abstract of Claim on File. 

Charles Allen Converse, of Philadelphia, born in Burlington, 
Vermont, 17 May, 1847; 
son of 

Rev. John Kcndrick Converse, born in Lyme, N. H., 15 
June, 1801, died in Burlington, Vermont, 3 Oct., 1880, and 
Sarah Allen, who was born in Milton, Vermont, 13 Aug., 1810, 
died in Burlington, 14 April, 1873; 
son of 

Joel Converse, born in Thompson Parish, Killingly, Conn., 
2 Sept., 1750, died in Lyme, N. H., 2c, June, 1822, and Eliza- r 
beth Bixbv, born in Killinglv, Conn., 2 Sept., 1762, died in 
Lyme, N. H., 12 Nov., 1850 ; 
son of 

Thomas Convers, born in Woburn, Mass., 28 Oct., 1699, 
and died in Thompson, Conn., about 1760, and Abigail Fay, 
second wife, born 79 January, 1709; 
son of 

Samuel Convers, of Woburn, Mass., born there 4 April, 

1662, died in Thompson, Conn., about 1732, and Dorcas . 

He was the founder of Thompson, Conn.; 
son of 

Sergeant Samuel Convers, of Woburn, baptized at Charles- 
town, Mass., 12 March, 1637, died 20 Feb., 1669, in Killingly, 
Conn., and Judith, daughter of Rev. Thomas Carter, of Woburn % 



•This record is reprinted through the courtesy of the Society of Colonial Wars 
»n the State of Vermunt, from a circular sent to members, illustrating the meth<Kl 
to be followed in the year-Look. It may prove suggestive as to the arrangement 
ol similar publications. 

95 



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95 CHARLES ALLEN CONVERSE. 

son of 

Deacon Edward Convers, born in Wakerly, County of North- 
ampton, England, 30 Jan., 1590, died in Woburn, Mass., 10 

Aug., 1663, and Sarah , second wife. 

Edward Convers came to New England in the company led by Governor 
Winthrop, 1630, and with his wife, was among those who formed the 
church at Charlestown, 30 July, 1630, known as the First Church of Boston. 
Convers established the first ferry between Charlestown and Boston. He 
was one of the selectmen of Charlestown, 1635— 16395 one of the pro- 
prietors of Woburn in 1639, and is said to have erected the first house there, 
and became identified with that town, serving as selectman, deacon of the 
church, and deputy to the General Court in 1660. 



Abstract of Supplementary Claims. .; ..! 
i ■• ALLEN. 

Sarah Allen, wife of Rev. John K. Converse, was the 
; daughter of 

Hon. Heman Allen, M. C, born 14 June, 1777, died 11 
' Dec, 1844, and Sarah Prentis (m. 4 Dec, 1804), born 3 Feb., 

\ 1786, died I Dec, 1850 ; 

Heman Allen lived in Grand Isle, Milton, and after 1823, Burlington. 
He represented Milton in the legislature. Elected to the Supreme Court in 
1827, but declined to serve. Member of Congress, 1832-40. Elected 
J trustee of the University of Vermont in 18 13. 

\ son of 

\ Corporal Enoch Allen, of Ashfield, Mass., born 27 Nov., 

j 1744, died 8 July, 1789, and Mercy Bclding (m. 28 Nov., 1771); 

Enoch Allen marched to Lexington on the alarm ot 19 April, 1775, ^"^ 
served during the seige of Boston in Col. John Fellows' regiment, Capt. 
Ebenezer W^ebber's company in which his brofher Samuel was lieutenant. 
He was corporal in Capt. Ephraim Jennings' company. Col. David Wells'" 
regiment, in the forces operating against Burgoyne. 

Mrs. Allen removed to Grand Isle, Vermont. 
son of 

Samuel Allen, of Deerfield, Mass., born 6 April, 1702, killed 
, by Indians 2j Aug., 1 746, and Hannah Hawks (m. 3 Nov., 
1727), of 13eerfield, born 7 July, 1703, died 8 March, 177 i ; 
Samuel Allen was killed at '<the Bars," Deerfield, while defending the 



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CHARLES ALLEN CONVERSE. 97 

place from assault by Indians. He had previously served as " Centenel " 
in the company of Capt, Joseph Kellogg from 19 May to 16 Nov., 1725 
(Mass. Arch., 905 206). In the History of Deerfield, p. 424, it is stated 
that he was wounded during the above service. 

son of 

Edward Allen, of Deerfield, born i May, 1663, died 10 Feb., 
1740, and Mercy Painter, whom he married at Elizabethtown, 

N. J., 24 Nov., 1683 ; 

Edward Allen removed from Suffield to Deerfield in 1684.. He was active 
in the preparations for and of defence of Deerfield, as related in the History 
of Deerfield, pp, 220, 279, 605. He was in military service in 1709 (Mass. 
Arch., 71 5 595). Under date of 1 May, 1725, he petitions for "dismission 
from watching,'" being sixty-two years ot age, and having '* for forty-six years 
yielded ready obedience to ye commands of my superiors In regard to watch- 
ing " (Mass. Arch., 52; p. 164). On 17 April, 1707, in company with 
Edmund Rice, Nathaniel Brooks, and John Sheldon, he proceeded to Can- 
ada, by order of Governor Dudley, to recover the English captives there. 
They returned on 18 Sept., with seven redeemed captives, after suffering great 
dangers and fatigues (Mass. Arch., 71 ; p. 436). 
son of 

Corporal Edward Allen, who died in Suffield, Mass., 21 Nov., 
1696, and Sarah Kimball (m. 24 Nov., 1658), who died 12 
June, 1696, aet. about fifty-six, daughter of Richard Kimball. 

Edward Allen was of Dedham in 1649 ; of Ipswich in 1670, and about 
1678 removed to Suffield, where he was selectman, and on the church records 
has the title of << Corporal." 



PRENTIS. 

Sarah Prentis, wife of Hon. Heman Allen, was daughter of 
Dr. Jonathan Prentis, born 12 July, 1750, died in St. Albans, 
Vt., 3 Apr., 1833, and Margaret Daniels, of Groton, Conn., 
born 17 Apr., 1756, died 2 Dec, 1824; 
son of 

Capt. Joseph Prentis, of New London, Conn., born 27 May, 
I 701, died (will proved 9 Nov., 1773), and Mercy Gilbert ; 

Joseph Prentis was commissioned lieutenant in the train band in New 
London, 1737 (Col. Rec. Conn., p. 121)5 commissioned captain, 1748 



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CHARLES ALLEN CONVERSE. 



(Col. Rec, Conn.). Of his sons, Stephen was killed at Bunker Hill, and 
Benjamin at Saratoga. 
son of 

Capt. Stephen Prentis, of New London, born 26 Dec, 1666, 
died near.Niantic Ferry in 1758, and Elizabeth Rogers, who 

died 30 April, 1737 ; - 

Stephen Prentis was commissioned captain of the train band in New Lon- 
don, II May, 1727 (Col. Rec. Conn., p. 96). One of the "overseers" of 
the Niantic Indians, 1728. Deputy to the General Assembly, 1728, 1729, 

son rf ' ^ 

John Prentis, of Roxburv, Mass., and New London, Conn., 
died in 1691, and Hester, who died in 1690 ; 

John Prentis was a shipTnaster, and deputy to the General Assembly from 
Fairfield, 1668. 
son of 

Valentine Prentis, who came from Nazing, Essex, England, 
in 1 63 1, and joined the church at Roxbury in 1632, which year 
he was admitted freeman. He died about 1633. 



HAWKS. 



Hannah Hawks, wife of Enoch Allen, of Ashfield j 
daughter of ' 

Deacon Eliezer Hawks, of Hadley, Mass., born 20 Dec, 1655, 
died 27 Mar., 1727, and Judith Smead (m. 30 April, 1689), 
born 18 Eeb., 1664, died 27 Jan., 1718-9, aet. 54. 

Eliezer Hawks came with the first permanent settlers to Deerfield, and was 
constantly in town office. He was in the Falls Fight, under Capt. William 
Turner (Mass. Arch , pp. 114, 594), and escaped unhurt. 



SMEAD. 

Judith Smead, wife of Eliezar Hawks ; 
daughter of 



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CHARLES ALLEN CONVERSE. 99 

William Smead, of Northampton, born about 1635, died 1704 

and Elizabeth Lawrence, of Hingham, baptized 6 Mar., 164 1—2 

Killed by Indians, 29 Feb., 1704. 

William Smead was son of the widow Judith Smead, of Dorchester, who 
was formerly wife of John Denman and sister of Col. Israel Stoughton, one 
of the most prominent men in the colony. William Smead was in the Falls 
Fight under Turner (Mass. Arch., pp. 114, 594). His son William was 
killed at Bloody Brook. 



LAMBERTON. 

Mercy Painter, wife of Edward Allen; 
daughter of 

Shubael Painter, of Westerly, R. [., and Mercy Lamberton, 
who was baptized 17 Jan., 1640; 
daughter of 

Capt. George Lamberton, of New Haven, and .Margaret. 

George Lamberton was admitted member of the General Court, i Se})t., 
1640 (Col. Rec. Conn. p. 3^), was frequently in public service. Chosen 
deputy, 1643, '644, 1645. ^"^ '6+] ^^'^s master of the '*Cock,'" and, visit- 
ing the governor of the Swedish fort on the Delaware, was seized and thrown 
into prison upon charge of instigating the Indians against the Swedes. He 
was concerned in the attempt to plant a colony on the Delaware. Inventory 
of his estate 21 June, 1647. He had sailed for England in 1646 in a ship 
which was never heard from. The story of the "Phantom Ship" is told at 
length in Atwater's History of New Haven. 



GRISWOLD. 

Elizabeth Griswold, wife of John Rogers; 
daughter of 

Lieut. Matthew Griswold, of Windsor, Saybrooke, and Lyme, 
Conn., born (near Kenilworth, f^ngland, about 1620.'') died in 
Lyme, 27 Sept., 1698, and Anna Wolcott. 

Matthew Griswold was employed upon public business relating to military 
affairs in 1647, 1660 (Col. Rec. Conn.). Deputy to the (xeneral Court, 
• 6^7, 1668, 1678-1685. Acting lieutenant at Lyme, 1667. Commis- 
sioner, 1 679-1 689 (Col. Rec. Conn.). See also p. 478, Reg. Soc. Col. 
Wars for 1897-8. 



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CHARLES ALLEN CONVERSE. 



WOLCOTT. 

Anna Wolcott, wife of Lieut. Matthew Griswold ; 
daughter of 

Henry Wolcott, of Windsor, Conn., baptized in Lydiard, St. 
Lawrence, England, 6 Dec, 1578, died in Windsor, Conn., 30 
May, 1655, and Elizabeth Saunders, baptized 20 Dec, 1584, 
died 7 July, 1655. 

Henry Wolcott was sworn constable 26 April, 1636. Collector for Hart- 
ford, 1637-8. Deputy to Particular Court, 5 June, 1643. Deputy to 
General Assembly, 9 Sept., 1647 (Col. Rec. Conn.). He was the second 
son of John Wolcott, of Tolland, Somersetshire, England. 



ROGERS. 

Elizabeth Rogers, wife of Capt. Stephen Prentiss ; 
daughter of 

John Rogers, of Milford and New London, baptized 1648; 
died 17 Oct., 1 72 1, and Elizabeth Griswold; 
son of 

James Rogers, of Stratford, Milford, and New London, Conn., 
died in New London, Feb., 1687-8 and Elizabeth, daughter of 
Samuel Rowland. 

James Rogers came to New England in 1635, aet. 20. He was appointed 
commissioner, 17 May, 1660, at a court of election held at Hartford. 
Deputy, 1665. Assistant, 1678, 1679, 1680 (Col. Rec. Conn.). 



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The Salem '* First Heeting^House.*' 

Two years ago the editor of this magazine, in a very moder- 
ately worded article, called attention to the error perpetuated by 
the officials of The Essex Institute by the exhibition of a small 
structure claimed by them to be the original first meeting-house 
at Salem. Facts, easily accessible, taken from the town records,, 
were presented, showing not only how the error first originated, 
but also why the building so carefully preserved could not be 
what it was claimed to be. 

The Institute has distributed thousands of little booklets pur- 
porting to give a description of the '^ relic " and of the original 
meeting-house. It was even proposed to include this sham relic 
in the addition to the Institute building which is contemplated. 

The exposure was met with unjust comments by the presi- 
dent of the institution and his supporters, which culminated in a 
personal attack upon the good faith of Hon. Abner Cheney 
Goodell, one of the vice-presidents, whose name had been used, 
in an unauthorized manner,as a support to the claim that the Insti- 
tute had preserved the original building. Mr. Goodell retaliated 
in an address read to the directors of the Institute, published later 
in pamphlet form, not only clearing himself from all suspicion 
of bad faith, but showing conclusively that he had been foremost in 
opposing the theory when it was first set up ; that he never signed, 
and could not have signed, not being a member of the commit- 
tee, the statement which has done service so many years, to 
substantiate the false character of the building. Moreover, he 
pointed out and made evident to any one who would follow the 
evidence presented, that Mr. Rantoul, now president of the society, 
was at the time the statement first saw light acting-editor of 
the Historic^/ Colltctiotis of the Essex Institute, and consequently 
responsible for the misuse of Mr. Goodell's name. 

V^arious additional facts, showing the impossibility of the 
building so carefully preserved being the old meeting-house, 
were also presented, obtained largely from notes furnished Mr. 
Goodell by the author of the '^ Enquiry into the Authenticity of 
the First Meetintr-house." 

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I04 THE SALEM "FIRST MEETING-HOUSE." 

The result of the controversy was the appointment by the 
directors of the Institute, of a committee to look into the ques- 
tion. Although two years have passed no report has been made^ 
but it is said, upon excellent authority, that Mr. Sidney 
Perley, who was employed by the committee to search the rec- 
ords for evidence, has completed his task and has arrived at a 
conclusion coinciding with that advanced in this magazine two 
years ago, that is, that the building preserved by the Institute is 
not in any way connected with the first meeting-house at Salem. 

In this number we present two vi-:ws, one representing 
the building as it now stands, and which has passed all these 
years for the original meeting-house partially restored. Opposite 
is presented a view of the building as it was when first discov- 
ered and before the restoration. 

The latter is from a sketch made by the late James H. Emmerton 
in 1 86 1. The building was then standing on the land of David 
Nichols in what is. now Proctor Street, off Boston Street. The 
original of this sketch is now in the possession of Mr. John Rob- 
inson, of Salem, but a duplicate, the gift of Dr. Emmerton, has 
been in the possession of the Institute since 1869. 

It is to be hoped that the Institute will publish the finding of 
the special committee. It may be said in passing that the sug- 
gestion that this building is the first meeting-house of the Friends 
is quite as largely theory as the former and now exploded claim. 

The investigations made by the writer two years ago have 
con\'inced him that not only was the first meeting-house erected 
at a date much earlier than claimed for this substitution, but that 
it was all that one would expect a place of worship of a so intensely 
religious people to be. As to its use for secular purposes there 
can be little doubt, nor that it was roomy, nearly square, and not 
unlike in shape the types which were persisted in for nearly a 
century. Against its walls were built shops; it was the rallying 
place of the watch ; it was the centre of the life of the settlement ; 
and it was in every respect worthy of a town which for a time 
hoped to be the seat of government. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAfllLY. 

By John H. Mansur, of Royersford, Pa. 

(Continued from page 43. J 



TRIBE OF JOHN. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

I-2-I. John Maxsur, of Methuen, son of John, probably 

born there, married Ruth , who had administration 

on his estate 5 Ans^ust, 1776. All but the first of her children 

then living. She married second Wood, of Andover, 

Me., and had a son Phineas, born in Dracut, 1779, who died in 

Rumford, 28 April, 1846. 

Children recorded at Methuen : — 

1-2-1-1. Hannah, born 27 Sept., 1764; died before her father. 

I-2-1-2. John, born 17 July, 1766. 

I-2-I-3. Elijah, born 23 April, 1768. 

1-2-1-4. Daniel, born 5 Dec, 1769. Settled in Stanstead, Lower Canada* 

he having visited Rumford afterward. 
I-2-I-5. James, born 31 July, 1772. 
I-2-I-6. Mehitable, born 14 Oct., 1774. Married (pub. Methuen, i April, 

1798) Francis Richardson, Jr., of Methuen. They lived in 

Haverhill. 



IV. 1-2-2. W11.1.IAM Mansur, son of John, born in Dracut, 
I Jan., 1737: died , 1808; married, 1762, Isabel Harvey. 

He went from Dracut, Mass., to Wilton, N. H., now Temple, 
sometime previous to 1772, and it may be he was one of the 
very first settlers. He purchased lot No. i, Wilton range of 
Temple lots in the extreme southwest corner of the town, then a 
wilderness, and possibly only to be traveled by marked trees.* 



*History of Temple, page 231. 

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lo6 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

It was evidently a wild, lonesome place, for a grandchild of Mr» 
Mansur remembers being told that the wolves very frequently 
sat upon the hill around the house and stared into the windows, 
and the bears could be distinctly heard calling their cubs, under 
the hill. The following story is related by Deacon N. Wheeler, 
of Temple :* William Mansur was an early settler, I suppose 
the first on the lot now owned by Senator Blanchard at the 
Falls, now known as Blood's, on Skowhegan River, September 
14th, 1762. He shut up his dog at home and started for Meth- 
uen, crossing the river southeast from his house at the fordway. 
He soon heard the dog yelping after him, and, looking, sav/ a 
panther following him. The dog ran under a heap of brush, 
and the panther sprang on top of it, as a cat after a mouse. The 
dog left the brush and ran to his master for protection. Mr. 
Mansur faced the creature, smote the ground with his staff, and 
made as formidable an appearance as possible ; and he supposed 
by the help of his scarlet vest, he terrified the animal that he 
was pleased to run away, and leave him to pursue his journey. 

Stirrinor times were at hand. The storm of resistance to 
British oppression, which had been gathering for some time, was 
about to break, and everybody in the settlement must take sides 
either for or against the Colonies. Fortunately, we are not left 
in uncertainty as to where. Williain Mansur stood. His name 
appears several times among those who espoused the " patriot's 
cause," and we have a pretty fair account of his services during 
the " times that tried men's souls." 

Early in the year 1776, the General Committee of Safety sent 
a communication to each of the several towns, t That to Temple 
reads : — 

To the selectmen of Temple, Colony of New Hampshire. In 
Committee of Safety, April 12th, 1776. In order to carry the 
unwritten resolves of the Honorable Continental Congress into 
execution, you are requested to desire all males above 21 years, 
lunatics, idiots, and negroes excepted, to sign the Declaration on 
this paper, and when so done to make return hereof, together 

♦History of Temple, page 175. 
fllistory of Temple, page 105. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 107 

with the name or names of all who shall refuse to sign the same, 
to the General Assembly or Committee of Safety of this Colony. 

M. WEARE, Chairman. 

In Congress, March 14TH, 1776. 
Resolved^ That it be recommended to the several Assemblies, Conventions 
and Councils, or Committees of Safety of the United Colonies, immediately to 
cause all persons to be disarmed within their respective colonies, who are noto- 
riously disaffected to the cause of America, or who have not associated or refuse 
to associate, to defend by arms the United Colonies against the hostile attempts 
of the British fleets and armies. Charles Thompson, Secretary. 

Action was immediately taken by the Town Council, as fol- 
lows : — 

"In consequence of the above resolution of the Honorable Continental Con- 
gress, and to show our determination in joining our American brethren in 
defending the lives, liberties, and properties of the inhabitants of the United 
Colonies, — 

•* We, the subscribers, do solemnly profess our entire willingness at the risque 
of our lives and fortunes with arms to oppose the hostile attempts of the British 
fleets and armies against the United American Colonies, whenever and to such a 
degree as such attempts of British may require."* 

This was signed by eighty-four persons, only two of whom, 
however, concern this narrative. The twelfth name is Peter 
Felt, who was the father of Hannah Felt, who married Stephen 
Mansur, No. 1-2-2-6, and the thirty-sixth name is William Man- 
sur. 

But he evidently was a man of deeds as well as words. We 
read : | 

*' April ye 19th, 1775. 

A list of those persons (fifty-six) who marched from Temple 
to Cambridge, Mass., on the alarm of the 19th of April, 1775." 
(This was the battle of Lexington). William Mansur appears 
on the list, and the record shows he was gone six and one half 
days. 

But this was not his only service. Twice afterward he vol- 
unteered in the Continental army. We find the following :| — 



•Minutes of Town Council. 

fHistory of Temple, pages 96 and 97. 

Jllistory of Temple, N. H., page 104. 



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Io8 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

** A list of those who engaged in ye Continental service, in 
Capt. Ezra Towne's company in Col. Reed's regiment for one 
year from January 7th, 1776." There are sixteen names in the 
list, of which William Mansur is the tenth, and Peter Felt, 
Ibefore mentioned, is the fourteenth. Again, June 29th, 1777, 
more than a year later, and presumably after the expira- 
tion of his former service, an alarm came from Ticonderoga, 
and the turnout was immense. There was a great rush to the 
town ammunition deposit, and there nine men drew powder, 
balls, and flints, and the next day they marched for Ticonderoga, 
thirty-seven all told, and in the list of names the twentieth is 
William Mansur. They were all in Capt Dr iry's company of 
Lt.-Col. P. Heald's regiment. He remained in the company 
during the siege, and when the American forces were compelled 
to evacuate the fort, retreated with them into Vermont. 

William Mansur married Isabella Harvey. She was born in 
Dracut, Mass., 1739- It is not known precisely, when she 
removed to Temple, N. H,,but it must have been soon after her 
marriage, for it is reported that she spent the greater part of her 
life there. Tradition relates that more than once she visited her 
friends in Dracut, traveling the whole journey of forty miles on 
horseback in one day, carrying her baby in her arms, and 
fording the Merrimac River on the way, the water rising to 
the pomel of tlie saddle. She survived her husband about 
twelve years, and died at Temple, N. H., December 27th, 
1826, aged eighty-seven years, leaving more than eightv de- 
scendants. 

Chu.dren born in Temple, N. H.: — 

William, born 23 Au;;., [29 Jan., Hist, of Wilton], 1763. 
John, born 16 March, 1765. 

Elizabeth, l)c>rn 4 March, 1767;. died in Andover, Vt., 1858; mar- 
ried Joseph Carrelton [Carleton, in Hist, of Wilton.] 
Joseph, b;)rii 23 March, 1769; died in Stanstead, Canada. 
Ezra, born 19 April, 1771. 
Stephen, born 18 Dec, 1773. 
Aaron, horn 7 March, 1776 
1-2-2-8. Jeremy, born 16 April, 1778; d. y. 
1-2-2-9. Hannah, born 13 Oct., 1779; lived at Springfield, Vt., and died 

there Fel)., 1850; married Charles Hawkins, of Temple. 
1-2-2 10. Harvey, born ii July, 1784; d. y. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 109 

IV. 1-2-4. James Mansur, of Dracut, son of John, born 7 
September, 1744; died 13 January, 18 16. He married 28 
March, 1776, [iS April, 1776, Methuen town record] Mary 
Harris, of Methuen, born 15 December, 1753; died 23 June, 
1826. She was the daughter of Deacon Peter Harris of 
Methuen. 

Children: — 

I-2-4-1. Hannah Lovejoy, born 3 Jan., 1777; died 4 April, 1858. 

1-2-4-2. James, born 9 Sept., 1779; died 8 Oct., 1829. . 

1-2-4-3. Mary, born 23 Oct., 1782; died 15 May, 1865. 

1-2-4-4. Abigail, born i July, 1784; died 16 July, 1830. 

1-2-4-5. Elizabeth, born 16 June, 1786. 

1-2-4-7. Rhoda, born 20 February, 1789; died II March, 1866. 

1-2-4-7. Daniel, born 19 March, 1791; died 26 July, 1829, 

1-2-4-8. Eunice, born 15 Feb., 1791; died s. p. 27 Aug., 1829; married 

Abial Jone?, of Andovor. 
1-2-4-9. John, born 29 June, 1795; died 25 Aug., 1829. 

Mrs. Mansur before her marriage set out apple trees on the 
farm which was to be her future home. One of the trees is 
yet standing. 



IV. 1-2-5. Samuel Mansur, son of John, married at 
Methuen, 2 May, 1765, Sarah Varnum, of Dracut. 

Children: — 

I-2-C-1. Hannah, "I ^ . married Amos Griffen, of Methuen. 
•^ > twins, 

1-2-5-2. John, J John was drowned in the Merrimack. 

1-2-5-3. Samuel, Jr., of Dracut; married there 25 Nov., 1790, Martha Varnum 

1-2-5-4. Clarissa, married 

1-2-5-5.^ Sarah Ann, married 5 Sept., 1831, Worthy White, Jr., of Methuen, 
" both of Methuen." 

" Samuel Mansur, of Dracut built a house next to Grandfather Moses Bailey in 
Dracut and'resided there. John (2) was drowned in the Merrimac River. Han- 
nah married Amos Griffen, of Methuen. Samuel Jr., married a sister of Gen. 
Varnum, of Dracut. Clarissa also married, but name of husband unknown. Sarah 
Ann married T. W. White, of Methuen." This information is from a grand- 
daughter of Samuel Mansur, Mrs. Hannah Jones, now living (1898) in Methuen 
in her 93d year. 



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TRIBE OF JOHN, 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

V. 1-2- 1 -2. John Mansur, son of John, born 17 July, 
1766; died , 1835; married 9 Dec, 1791, Susanna 

Morrill, of Methuen, Mass., born 2 July, 1767; died in Mon- 
roe, Me., 18 April, 1855. 

John Mansur was a Baptist deacon. He moved from 
Dracut, Mass., to East Andover, N. H., previous to iSoo, 
thence to Belfast, Me., in 1S02, and in 1807 to Monroe, Me. 

ClULDKEN : — 

1-2-1-2-1. Susan, born 8 Oct., 1 791 ; died. 

1-2-1-2-2. John, 4th, born 4 June, 1793; died. 

(Was drowned in the Ohio River when a young man.) 

1-2-1-2-3. Morrill, born 31 March, 1795; died. 

1-2-1-2-4. David, born 27 March, 1797; died. 

. 1-2-I-2-5. Holton, born 17 April, 1799; died. 

1-2-1-2-6. Moody, born 15 Feb., 1801; died. 

I-2-I-2-7. Alvah, ^ , .-.J ,0^^ 1 died. 

' V born 16 Nov., 1504, v 

1-2-1-2-8. Alvan, i J died. 

![ 1-2-1-2-9. Rufus, born 7 Feb., 1806; died. 

1-2-1-2-10. Reuben, born 7 March, 181 1; died. 

The following is an obituarv notice of Susanna Morrill Man- 
sur : — 

"Departed this life in Monroe, Me., April i8th, 1855, Susanna, relict of 
Deacon John Mansur, aged eighty-seven years eight months. 

"The subject of this notice was born in Methuen, Mass., July 2d, 1767. 
About the year 1790 she married John Mansur, of Dracut, Mass. In a few years 
they moved to East Andover, where they erected the first saw and grist mill ever 
built in that town; in 1S02 they moved to Belfast, Me.; in 1807, to Monroe, then 
a wilderness without roads or bridges, where she buried her husband in 1835. 

** She was remarkably blessed with health — had one daughter and nine sons, 

most of whom are now living. She retained her mental faculties in an eminent 

^ degree. Incidents of the Revolution, the ' Dark Day,' etc., were vivid in her 

recollections. She experienced religion in her youth and ever after taught it by 

precept and example to all with whom she associated. H. M." 

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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. in 

V. 1-2-1-3. Elijah Mansur, son of John, born 23 April, 

1766; married i Dec, 1791, Lucy Messer. They settled in 

Rum ford, Me. 

Children: — 

I-2-1-3-1. Elijah, born 29 June, 1792.* 

I-2-1-3-2. Lucy, born 13 Oct., 1794* 

I-2-I-3-3. Leonard, born 26 Jan., 1797.* 

I-2-I-3-4. Asa, born 19 Feb., 1799.* 

I-2-1-3-5. John, born 29 April, 1 801.* 

I-2-1-3-6. Warren, 

I-2-1-3-7. Susan, , living in Rumford in 1887. She married 

Cyrus P. Newton. 
1-2-1-3-8. Salome, , married Isaac Newcomb. 

1-2- 1 -3-9. Hannah, , married Samuel Chapman. 

I-2-I-3-10. Mary Jane, born in Rumford, 1820. 



V. 1-2-1-4. Daniel Mansur, son of John, born i Sept., 
(one record gives it 5 Dec), 1769, died 12 June, 1832; mar- 
ried 16 March, 179S, to Nancy Davis, of Barington, N. H. ; 
born 18 Jan., 1776; died 22 May, 1863. They moved from 
Methuen, Mass., to Stanstead, Canada, in 1801. 

Children : — 

1-2-1-4-1. Lois, born 7 Sept., 1799; died. 

I-2-I-4-2. John, born 2 July, 1802. 

I-2-I-4-3. Daniel, born 7 Aug., 1804. 

I-2-1-4-4. Ruth, born 14 March, 1806; died , 1864. 

J. 2-1-4-5. Horace, born 20 March, 1808. 

1-2-1-4-6. Nancy, born 8 Aug., iSi I ; died ,1814. 

I-2-I-4-7. Valeria, born 27 May, 1814. 



V. 1-2-1-5. James Mansur, son of John, born 31 July, 
1772. 

Children: — 

I-2-1-5-1. James, born 9 Sept., 1773; died 8 Oct., 1829. 

I-2-1-5-2. Daniel, born 19 March, 1791; died 26 July, 1829..^ 

I-2-1-5-3. Darius. 

1-2-1-5-4. Hiram. 

I-2-I-5-5. Comfort. 

1-2-1-5-6. Ruth. 

I-2-1-5-7. Maria. 

1-2-1-5-8. One who married a Morrill. 



*These dates aie from the town records of Methuen. 






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112 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

V. I-2-2-I. William Mansur, son of William, born 29 

Jan., 1763; died 6 Sept., 1S44; married i March, 17S7,* 

Sarah Bridge, of Littleton, Mass., who died 22 Oct., 1S37, at. 

72. William Mansur was a farmer in Wilton, w^here he was 

first taxed in 1798. He was one of the first members of the 

Baptist church. 

Children, born* probably in Wilton : — 
1-2-2-1-1. William, born 21 Dec, 17S7. 
1-2-2-1-2. Lavina, born 20 Jan., 1790; died Sept., 1872; married Eben 

Adams, of Mason, N. H. 
1-2-2-1-3. Jeremy, born 31 Dec, 1791. 
I -2-2- 1 -4. Sarah, born 4 May, 1794; died March, 1873; married 27 June, 

1816, Joseph Saunders, of Mason. 
I-2-2-I-5. Samuel, born 17 Aug., 1796. 
1-2-2-1-6. Perly, born 3 March, 1799. 
I-2-2-1-7. Clara Farvvell, born 2 Jan., 1801; died 14 Feb., 1892; married 

29 March, 1S25, Joseph Brooks Holt, a hotel proprietor at 

South Merrimack. -. , 

I-2-2-I-8. Josiah, born 31 Oct., 1802. 

I-2-2-1-9. Abner, born 28 Aug., 1804; died at Groton Centre, i May, 1887. 
I-2-2-I-IO. Franklin, born 6 April, 1808; died after 1887. 
I-2-2-I-11. Hiram, born 8 April, 1812. 



V. 1-2-2-4. Joseph jSIansur of Morgan, Vt., son of Wil- 
liam, born at Temple, N. H., 23 March, 1769; died at Mor- 
gan, Vt., Sept., 1S60; married at Danville, 1798, Abiah, 
daughter of Captain Elliott of that place. ■ ' 

Children: — 

I-2-2-4-1. Warren, born 23 June, 1800. 
1-2-2-4-2. William, born March, 1802. 

1-2-2-4-3. Betsey, born March, 1804; died March, 1870; married 

Zophar Mack, of Stanstead. 

Joseph Mansur removed in 1816 to Stanstead, P. Q., and 
remained there six years. From 1822 till death he lived in Mor- 
gan, Vt. He was a shoemaker and a man of Christian virtues. 



V. 1-2-2-6. Stephen Mansur, son of William, born at 
Temple, N. H., 18 Dec, 1773; died 11 May, 1865, at Wilton, 



♦From an old Bible belonging to Sarah (Bridge) Mansur, copied by a daugh- 
ter of Jeremy Mansur. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 113 

N. H. ; married 6 Dec, 179S, Hannah Felt, of Temple, daugh- 
ter of Peter Felt. She was born in Temple 16 Nov., 1778, and 
died 24 Feb., 1824. He was mayor of Lowell ; trustee and 
director in the City Savings and Appleton Bank. 

Children : — 

1-2-2-6-1. Stephen, born 25 Aug., 1799. 

1-2-2-6-2. Alvah, born 25 March, 1801. 

1-2-2-6-3. John Taylor Oilman, born 12 March, 1803. 

1-2-2-6-4. Charles, born 24 Nov., 1805. 

1-2-2-6-5. Moody, born 3 Feb., 1808. 

1-2-2-6-6. Lucy A., born 6 Jan., 1810. 

1-2-2-6-7. Hannah Augusta, born 22 May, 1811; died 26 June, 1841; mar- 
ried, Lowell, 6 May, 1S34, Oeorge 'M. Griffin. / 

1-2-2-6-8. Isaiah, born 19 Feb., 1815, 

1-2-2-6-9. Mary Catherine, born 12 June, 1817; died 29 Oct., 1845; mar- 
ried 3 Jan., 1842, Samuel G, Pratt. 

I-2-2-6-10. Stillman, b<^rn 17 Jan., 1820. 

I-2-2-6-II. Porter, born 4 April, 1822. 

I-2-2-6-12. Harriet Newell, born 17 Aug., 1826; married at Lowell, 24 Dec, 
1851, John Dedarra; married, 2d, 29 Jan., 1871, Nathan Foster. 



V. 1-2-2-7. Aarox jMansur, of Lowell; son of William 
born 7 March, 1776; died , ^859. 

Children : — 

1-2-2-7-1. Joseph Warren; died in Duxbury. He was a graduate of Harvard, 
and of the Law School. A prominent Democratic politician. 

1-2-2-7-2. married Hon. John Nesmith; her daughter married Hon. 

Frederic Thomas Grcenholge, iSL C, and Governor of Mass., 
1893-6. Gov. Greenhalge died in Lowell, 5 March, 1896. 

1-2-2-7-3. Abby, died 7 April, 185b; married Hon. S. W. Baird. 



V. I -2-4- 1. Hannah Lovejoy Mansur, daughter of 
James, born 3 Jan., 1777; died 4 April, 185S; married (pub. 
2 Nov., 1800) Oliver Whittier, of Methuen. 
Children: — 



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114 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

V. 1-2-4-2. James Mansur, son of James, bpf-ii 9 Sept., 
,1779; ^^^^ S Oct., 1839; married Abigail Griffin, of Methuen. 

Children : — 



i I -2-4-2- 1. Abigail. 

;■ 1-2-4-2-2. James. 

I 1-2-4-2-3. Rebekah. 

\ 1-2-4-2-4. Mary. 

Y 1-2-4-2-5. David. 

I 1-2-4-2-6. Eleanor. 



1-2-4-2-7. Uiania. 

Two of the daughters were living in 1893. 



V. 1-2-4-3. Mary Mansur, daughter of James, born 23 
Oct., 17S2; died 15 jNIay, 1S65 ; married James Stevens, of 
Andovcr, Mass. 

Chh-drkn : — 

I-2-4-3-1. Mary. 

1-2-4-3-2. James. 

1-2-4-3-3. Clarissa. 

1-2-4-3-4. Phineas. 

1-2-4-3-5. Asenath. 

1-2-4-3-6. Abigail. 

1-2-4-3-7. Warren. 

The children are all dead. Mr. Stevens was one of the first selectmen of 
Lawrence. 



V. 1-2-4-4. Abigail Mansur, daughter of James, born 
I July, 17S4; died 16 July, 1S30; married (Int. 7 Aug., 1S07), 
Samuel Richardson, 3d, of Orange, Vt., (of Methuen, Town 
Record). Lived in Dracut. 

Children: — 

1-2-4-4-1. Samuel. 
1 -2-4-4-2. Abigail. 
1-2-4-4-3. David. 
1-2-4-4-4. Varnum. 

1-2-4-4-5. Jo^h , . 

1-2-4-4-6. Mary. 
. 1-2-4-4-7. James. 

Two children are living. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 115 

V. 1-2-4-5. Elizabeth Mansur, daughter of James, born 
16 June, 1786; died ; married , 1807, John 

Hunt, of Andover, Mass. 

-Child: — 

1-2-4-5-1- Hannah, ; m. Rev. Eastman, of Ann 

Arbor, Mich. He was a teacher. 



V. 1-2-4-6. Rhoda Mansur, daughter of James, born 20 
Feb., 1789; died 11 March, 1S66; married George Titcomb, 
of Pelham, N. H. , 

Children: — 

1-2-4-6-1. Moses. 
1-2-4-6-2. Simeon. 
1-2-4-6-3. Ephraim. 
All dead. 



V. 1-2-4-7. Daniel Mansur, son of James, born 19 Mar., 
1791; died 26 July, 1829; married i December, 1814, Eliza- 
beth M. Bailey, of Dracut, Mass., born 17 July, 179S; died 
19 June, 1867. 

-Children, born at Dracut : — 

1-2-4-7-1. Moses, born 23 September, 1815; died 4 March, 1896. 

1-2-4-7-2. Lucinda, born 19 August, 1817. 

1-2-4-7-3." Aaron, born 2 September, 1819; died 27 August, 1823. 

1-2-4-7-4. William, born 18 December, 1S21; died 26 February, 1879. 

1-2-4-7-5. Aaron, born 23 June, 1824; disappeared. 

1-2-4-7-6. Charles, born 15 January, 1827; died ?i February, 1897. 

Daniel TvIansur was a farmer, and lived and died in the house 
in which he was born. In ^Llrch, 1S23, while cutting logs in 
the woods, assisting his brother James, a tree fell on him and 
nearly killed him. lie was confined to his bed. for five months, 
althoucrh he eventually recovered and lived six vears afterwards. 
he was never able to do any hard work. 

He. was a man of sterling worth, honest and upright in all 
his dealing's, and grreatlv beloved bv his friends and neighbors. 

In 1829 there was an epidemic of typhoid fever in Methuen. 
Few homes escaped a visitation of the dread disease. There 
were not well enough to care for the sick. He died 26 July. 
On the 2ist August a nephew died ; on the 24th a brother, and 



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i^ Ii6 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

''•ii ' ' 

-':':} on the 27th a sister. In October another brother died. *'My 

■ / mother was so sick tliat she could not see her husband after he 

died." "Our relatives were mostly well-to-do farmers." Let- 
ter of Miss Lucinda Mansur. 

Elizabeth M. Bailey, wife of Daniel Mansur, was born 
17 July, 179S, at Dracut, Mass. She was descended from 
Lieut. Moses Bailey, of Andover, Mass., a Revolutionary sol- 
dier, of the Massachusetts Line. He lived to see 98 years, and 
the fifth generation of his descendants. On 25 July, 1765, he 
■> ' married Elizabeth Mooars, of Andover, Mass., by whom he had 

/■ ten children, five sons and five daughters. 

i': . His oldest son, Moses Bailey, was born 20 October, 1766, 

^' and married Mehitabel Chase, of Andover, Mass., who was 

born 12 December, 176S. There were six children, two sons 
and four daughter;;, as the fruit of this union, of whom Eliza- 
beth M. Bailey was the fifth child. Elizabeth M. Mansur, 
widow of Daniel Mansur, married, second, 22 September, 
1 83 1, Samuel Richardson, of Dracut, Mass., a farmer, who died 
12 February, 1S33. He was born at Dracut, 5 October, 1S08. 
By him she had a child, Augusta Ann, born 17 July, 1832, who 
ij' married 20 Sept., 1850, George Homer Foye* of Andover, 

*George Homer Foye, hushan'l of Augusta Ann Richardson, was born at Bos- 
ton, Mass., on 14 January, 1828. He was the son of Jonathan and Hannah 
Foye, of Barrington, N. H. In 1832 his parents removed to Andover, Me., and 
engaged in farming. He came to Methuen in November, 1847, and went to 
1 . work in the mills of the Methuen Manufacturing Co. He remained in their em- 

I i ;• ploy until his death, 7 October, 1896, a period of forty-nine years. 

\\] For nearly forty years he was foreman of the department in which he worked, 

f'^,'" and enjoyed the confidence of his employers to a high degree. He was a man 

,||f of genial disposition, and had the faculty of making hosts of friends, 

^r Children, both born in Methuen; Emma Adell Foye, born 5 August, 1853; 

]j at Methuen, Mass. After attending school in her own town, she went to the 

j I liigh school at Salem, Mass., to qualify herself for teaching, and graduated with 

; ' honor. She taught school until her marriage to Eldridge L. Kent, which occur- 

i red 7 December, 18S0, when she removed to Lawrence, Mass. Her husband 

/. sold out his business of baker and confectioner, and finally she removed to 

* ' Methuen, Mass., where she now lives. She has three children, all born in 

I Methuen, Grace E. Kent, born 16 Oct., 1881, died ; Clarence L. Kent, born 2 

, ,; Aug., 1883 ; Arthur S. Kent, born 23 Sept., 1888; Iza A. A. Foye, born 26 

, .; Feb., 1862 ; married 24 Dec./ 1883 ; Winchell W. Messer, of Methuen. They 

' have three children: George C. Messer, born 27 April, 1884; Clarence W. 

I Messer, born 17 Oct., 1885; Helena G. Messer, born 15 Feb., 1891. 

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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 117 

Me. She resided in Dracut, Mass., until the death of her sec- 
ond hushand, then removed to Tvlethuen, Mass., Hving there 
twenty-eight years, but returned to Dracut, where she died 19 
June, 1867, in her 69th year. 

She was a woman of strong will and great force of character, 
and brought up her large family with great strictness, but with 
it all was a good mother, a dutiful wife,, and a good neighbor. 



V. 1-2-4-9. Jo^^ Mansur, son of James, born June, 

1795; died 25 Aug., 1829; married Lydia Thistle, of Pelham, 

N. H. 

Children : — 

I-2-4-9-I. Hannah. 

1-2-4-9-2. John, ; living in 1893. 

1-2-4-9-3. Eliphalet. 

1-2-4-9-4. Lydia. 

All dead but John, who is cared for by the town. 



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TRIBE OF JOHN. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

VI. I-2-I-2-IO. Reuben Morrill Mansur, son of John^ 
born 7 Mar., 1811; died ; married Serena Boyd^ 

settled in Houlton, Maine. 

Children: — 

I-2-1-2-10-1. John Sargent. 

I-2-1-2-10-2. Morrill. 

I-2-1-2-10-3. Susie. 

I-2-1-2-10-4. Charles E., born , 1841; lives in Houlton. 

I-2-1-2-10-5. Velzora T. 

I-2-I-2-IO-6. Hickory. 

. I-2-I-2-10-7. Lydia. 

I-2-1-2-10-8. Helen. 

1-2-1-2-10-9. Adelbert W. 



VI. 1-2-1-3-2. Lucy Mansur, daughter of Elijah, born 13 

Oct., 1794; died ; married (Int. at Rumford, 

Me., 15 Sept., 1S23,) Stephen Abbott, who was aged 48 in 

1850 (see History of Rumford). 

Children: — 

I-2-1-3-1. Charles H., born 1826. 

i-2-(-3-2. Maria H., born 1829. ; * 

VI. I -2- 1 -3-5. John Mansur, son of Elijah, born 29 
April, 1 80 1. 

In 1850 the Rumford, Me., Census shows as living John Man- 
sur, a;t. 38, Susan Mansur, ait. 37. The age of John is incor- 
rectly given. 



VI. 1-2-1-3-6. Warren Mansur, of Rumford, Me., son 

of Elijah, born in Mass., aet. 46 in 1850; married 11 Feb., 

1837, at Rumford, Elvira M. Barnes, a^t. 38 in 1850, born in 

N. H. He was a shoemaker. Postmaster at Rumford Point, 

1855-1862. 

118 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 119 

Children: — 

I-2-1-3-6-1. Thomas Hersey, born 15 Feb., 1838; (for a time in Belfast, Me). 
I-2-I-3-6-2. George E.,* born 1842; clerk in provision store in Stoneham, 

Jiving with his aunt, Mrs. Lyman, in 1887. He was wounded 

at Gettysburg. 
I -2- 1 -3-6-3. Mary J., born , 1844; married Dr. Hiram F., son of 

Hiram and Mary (Huston) Abbot (their m. int. 2 June, 1835), 

at Rumford. Lives at Rumford Point. 
I-2-1-3-6-4. Susan F., born , 1846. 

I-2-I-3-6-5. John W., born , 1849. 

VI. 1-2- 1 -3- 10. Mary Jane Mansur, daughter of Elijah, 
born in Rumford, Me., 1820. 

She lived in Rumford till she was sixteen years old then 
visited her sister in Boston, where she married George Lyman. 

Mr. Lyman died in 1850, leaving his widow real estate 
in Boston, but she lived for many years in Stoneham (1887). 
Her nephew, George, son of Warren Mansur, lives with 
her. She supplied valuable information regarding this line. 
She also had the tradition that John, of Methuen, was born 
in 1702 and came from England. She remembered a handsome 
and peculiar bottle with the initials PL L. blown in it. Their 
family papers were destroyed by fire in her father's house. 

No children. 

VL 1-2-2-1-1. William Mansur, son of William Man- 
sur, born in Wilton, N. H., 21 Dec* 1787; married, Dec, 
1814, Gertrude Horton, of Cincinnati, O. ; married the second 
8 Dec, 1825, Syrena White, of Delaware, O. 

Children : — 

1-2-2-1-1-1. Isaiah, born 18 Jan., 1816; died II Jan., 1823. 

I-2-2-1-1-2. Harriet, born 22 July, 1817. 

1-2-2-1-1-3. Charles N., born 6 Aug., 1819; died. 

1-2-2-1-1-4. William J., born 10 March, 1S23; died ii Aug., 1824. 

I-2-2-1-1-5. William B., born 15 Sept., 1826; died I Jan., 1856. 

1-2-2-1-1-6. Sarah J., born i Sept., 1829; died 17 May, 1894. 

I-2-2-1-1-7, Serena, born 25 Feb., 1832. 

I-2-2-1-1-8. Elmina, born 24 May, 1834; died 2 April, 1855. 

I-2-2-1-1-9. Henry S., born 2 Aug., 1842. 



*Gcorge T. Mansur mustered into Company A, 12th Maine Inf., 21 Nov., 
J86i. Mustered out, as sergeant, 7 Dec., 1864, at Rumford. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 



VI. I -2-2- 1-2. Lavina Mansur, daughter of William 
Mansiir; married 8 Dec, i8ii, Eben Ayer Adams, of Mason, 
N. H., son of John and Mary (Adams) Adams, born 15 Nov., 
1786. He died 22 Nov., 1867, at Mason. 

Children, born in Mason: — 

I-2-2-1-2-1. Mariah Adams, born 18 Oct., 1812, married J. G. Winship. 

I-2-2-1-2-2. Prescott Adams, born 1810; died 1819.. 

1-2-2-1-2-3. Samuel E. Adams, born i April, 1820. 

1. 2-2-1-2-4. Abel Edward Adams, born 25 June, 1824. 

1-2-2-1-2-5. Aaron A. Adams, born 25 June, 1824. 

1.2-2-1-2-6. Lucius Adams, born May, 1827; died 1829. 

1. 2-2-1-2-7. Sarah Amanda Adams, born 10 July, 1834; married H. K. French. 

VI. I -2-2- 1 -3. Jeremy Maxsur, son of William Mansur; 
married 2 May, 1S14, Jane, daughter of Thomas Carr, of Ken- 
tucky, born 24 Feb., 1794. She died 19 Sept., iSSi. 

Chh.dren : — 

Mary Ann, horn 22 Feb., 1815. 

Clarissa, born 17 June, 181 7. 

William, born 20 Jan., 1819. 

Sarah Jane, born 5 June, 1821. 

Isaiah, born 14 April, 1824. 

Frank Land, born 8 April, 1828. 

James, born 18 Jan., 1831 ; died 4 Nov., 1832. 
Jeremy Mansur, the father, was born in Temple, N. H., 31 Dec, 1791, and 
died 17 Jan., 1875. 



1-2-2-1-3-1. 
I-2-2-1-3-2. 
1-2-2-1-3-3. 
1-2-2-1-3-4. 
I-2-2-1-3-5. 
1-2-2-1-3-6. 
I-2-2-1-3-7. 



V. 1-2-2-1-4. Sarah Mansur, daughter of William Man- 



sur, born 4 May, 1794; married 
Sanders, of iMason, N. II. 
Childrf.n : — 



18 1 6, Joseph 



1-2-2-1-4-1. 

1-2-2-1-4-2. 
1-2-2-1-4-3. 
1-2-2-1-4-4. 
1-2-2-1-4-5. 



Samuel Sanders, born 
Charles ' " " 

Emily " « 

Harriet " " 

Sarah VV. " " 



V. I -2-2- 1-5. Samuel Mansur, son of William Mansur, 
born 17 Aug., 1796; married Martha Collins, of Boston, Mass. 

Children : — 



1-2-2-1-5-1. 
1-2-2-1-5-2. 
1-2-2-1-5 3. 
1-2-2-1-5 4. 
1-2-2-1-5-5. 
i-2-2-i-!;-6. 



Samuel, 

George, 

Martha, 

Dora, 

John, 

A daughter, 



bo 



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; died 3 Dec, 1880. 
m. Thayer. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 121 

V. I -2-2- 1 -6. Perley Mansur, son of William Mansur, 

born 3 March, 1799; died ; married 

Children: — 

I -2-2- 1 -6- 1. George, born 

I-2-2-I-6-2. Mariah, '* 

1-2-2-1-6-3. James, '* 



V. 1-2-2- 1 -7. Clara Farwell (Clarissa) Mansur, 

daughter of William Mansur, born Wilton, N. H., 2 Jan., 

1801 ; died 14 Feb., 1S92, at North Chelmsford; married at 

Wilton, 29 March, 1825, Joseph B. Holt, of W^ilton, N. H. He 

carried on a hotel at South Merrimack and died in 185 1. 

Children : — 

Clara A. Molt, born 29 Dec, 1826. 



1-2-2-1-7-1 
1-2-2-1-7-2 

1-2-2-1-7-3 

1-2-2-1-7-4 

1-2-2-1-7-5 



George B. " " 

William M. " " 

Elizabeth V. " « 

Charles A. " « 
A Child. 



Mrs. Holt lived with her daughter, Mrs. F. J. Adams, for forty years till her 
death. 



V. I-2-2-I-S. TsAiAii Mansur, son of William Mansur, 

married Mary King, of Wilton, N. H. 

Children: — * — . 

I-2-2-I-8-I. Mariah. 
I-2-2-I-8-2. Isaiah. 



VI. 1-2-2- 1-9. Arthur Mansur, son of AVilli^am Mansur, 

married Lucy Sawtelle, of iSIason, N. H. 

Children: — 

1-2-2-1-9-1. Charles. 

1-2-2-1-9-2. George. 

I-2-2-I-9-3. Lucy. 



VI. 1-2-2 


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sur, married 




Children: — 




1-2-2-1-10-1. 


Elizabeth. 


1-2-2-1-10-2. 


Charles. 


1-2-2-1-10-3. 


Hiram. 


1-2-2-1-10-4. 


Albia. 



Franklin Mansur, son of William Man- 



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122 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

VI. I I-2-3-I-II. Hiram Maxsur, son of William Mansur, 
born 8 Aug., 1812, at North Chelmsford ; died 2 Oct., 1879, on 
his plantation; married Mary Spencer, of New Orleans, La., 
born about 1S35. 

Children: — 

1-2-2-1-11-1. Joseph P. 

I-2-2-I-II-2. Mary 

I.2-2-I-11-3. Warren 

I-2-2-1-11-4. Lucy 

I-2-2-I-11-5. Alma 

Seven died young. 

About the year 1S40 or earlier he settled in Lousiana about 
terr miles below Baton Rouge. In 1879 he visited North Chelms- 
ford, the first time in forty years. During the war he was a 
Union man, but suffered from both sides. He lost $250,000 
during the war. At his death he owned 1,200 acres near Baton 
Rouge, and 1,000 acres in Texas. 



set. 24, 


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VI. I -2-2-4- 1. Warren Mansur, son of Joseph, born in 
Danville, Vt., 23 June, 1800; died at Island Pond, Vt. ; Jan., 
1885 ; married at Morgan* Vt., August, 1S25, Jane A., daugh- 
ter of John ^lorse, of Barnet, Vt., a descendant of a Mayflower 
pilgrim. She died Oct., 1891, a3t. 84 years, 7 months. Mr. 
Mansur was a farmer and a republican. His first vote was for 
J. Q. Adams for president. 

Children: — 

I-2-2-4-1-1. Susan, ; married T. F. Ballard, of Springfield, 

Mass., who died Sept., 1880, leaving five children. 
1-2-2-4-1-2. Joseph Aaron, settled in Island Pond, 1859 ; 

died there Oct., 1896, unmarried. He held many town and 

county offices and a commission in the State Guards during 

the Civil War. 

I-2-2-4-1-3. Warren, died of consumption, at Morgan, in 1859. 

School teacher. 
1-2-2-4-1-4. Eliza J., born ; died March, 18S5. She married 

Mark Wiggins and lived in Sleepy Eye, Minn. Three children. 
I-2-2-4-I-5. Abiah A., born 1836; died at Island Pond, 9 April^ 

1896; married Charles Blake, of Derby, Vt., who was killed 

in battle at Winchester, 19 Sept., 1864. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 123 

1-2-2-4-1-6. Jacob C, 

Enlisted in K. Co., loth Vt. Vol., and served three years. 
Now lives in Los Gatos, Cal., a merchant. He married, after 
the war, Martha Ray, of Hinesburgh, Vt., who died in Cali- 
fornia, childless. 

I-2-2-4-I-7. Sarah C, twin with Jacob C, died Oct., 1865, Charlestown, Vt. 
She married Henry AUbee, of Morgan, and had two daughters, 
one of whom married Joel H. Rosebrook, and lives in Bar- 
ton, Vt. 

1-2-2-4-1-8. Mary A., Lives on the homestead at Island Pond, 

unmarried. She was a successful school teacher. 
I-2-2-4-1-9. Zophar, died in infancy. 

1-2-2-4-1-10. Zophar M., born in Morgan, 19 Nov., 1843. 

I-2-2-4-1-11. Luella H., lives, unmarried, at Island Pond, on the homestead. 

I-2-2-4-1-12. John K., died in infancy. 

I-2-2-4-1-13. Orange L.,a grocer at Island Pond. He was an assistant post- 
master for many years. He married Mehitable Kimpton, but 
has no children. 

I-2-2-4-1-14. Emma A., formerly a school teacher; married 

H. H. Hobson, of Island Pond, a lumber merchant in Hast- 
ings, Me. She has a son and daughter. 



VL 1-2-2-4-2. William Manslr, son of Joseph, a farmer, 
of Morgan, Vt. ; died at Morgan, Sept., iSSo; married 

, Hannah I^lood, of Derby, Vt., who died Sept., 
1871. They have no descendants bearing the Mansiir name. 
Two of the sons married. 

Children: — 

1-2-2-4-2-1. Betsey, ; died in infancy. 

1-2-2-4-2-2. Betsey, ; married William 

Demick, who died . She lives in Morgan* 

Ch.: William, Celia. 

1-2-2-4-2-3. Harvey, ; died, 1862. 

1-2-2-4-2-4. Samuel, ; died ; married Miss 

Townsen. " .. _- \ 

1-2-2-4-2-5. Sally M., ; married Warren Twombly; mar- 

ried second Jewett Hill and lives at Barton, Vt. One son, 
Wilmer Z. Twombly. 

1-2-2-4-2-6. Hannah, ; died 

1-2-2-4-2-7. Moses, ; died 

1-2-2-4-2-8. Alzina, ; died ; married Nickerson 

Morse. 



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124 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

VI. 1-2-2-4-3. Betsey Mansur, daughter of Joseph, born 
in Danville, Vt., March, 1S04; died March, iS;o; mar- 
ried , Zophar Mack, of Stanstead, P. Q. 

Children, (all dead): 

1-2-2-4-3- 1. William. 

1-2-2-4-3-2. Mary. 

1-2-2-4-3-3. George. 

1-2-2-4-3-4. Lydia. 

1-2-2-4-3-5. Clarissa. 

1-2-2-4-3-6. Flora. 

1-2-2-4-3-7. Lurana. 

1-2-2-4-3-8. Rebecca. 

1-2-2-4-3-9. Elizabeth. 

1-2-2-4-3- 10. Edwin. 



VI. 1-2-2-6-2. Alvah Mansur, of St. Louis, son of 
Stephen, born 25 March, iSoi ; died at Lowell, i Nov., 1S40; 
married, at Littleton, Mass., 11 March, 1S29, Elizabeth Wood, 
who died 5 Sept., 1S62. 



VI. 1-2-2-6-4. Charees jNIansur, son of Stephen, born 
24 Nov., 1805;' died Ray County, Mo., 12 Aug., 1S47; mar- 
ried iS May, :S34, at Philadelphia, Rebecca A. Wills, who 
died 8 May, 1873. in Ray County. 

Child: — 

I-2-2-6-4-1. Charles 11., bom in Philadelphia, 6 March, 1835. 



VI. 1-2-4-7-1. Moses Mansur, son of Daniel, born 23 
Sept., 1S15; died 4 March, 1S96; married 29 July, 1S41, at 
Philadelphia, Catherine Hoffman, of Lancaster County, Penna. 

Children: All but the eldest born in Philadelphia: — 
1-2-4-7-1-1. John Hoffman, born 25 May, 1842. 

I-2-4-7-1-2. Annie Elizabeth, born 23 May, 1845; nvarried Wm. S. Schofield; 
married, second, Wm. P. Cahill. 
• I-2-4-7-1-3. George \V., born 23 Oct., 184S; died unmarried, 2 Feb., 1872, 
i , 1-2-4-7-1-4. Charles IL, borri 29 Aug., 1851. 

1-2-4 7*^-5- Catherine, born 15 July, 1S56; died 10 April, 1S59. 
1-2-4-7-1-6. Warren Bailey, born 26 Jan., i860. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 125 

Moses Mansur worked at farming on the homestead until 
about fifteen jears old, when he went to Methuen, Mass., 
and learned the trade of blacksmlthing. About the year 1839 
he came to Philadelphia, and went to work for William Beach, 
a manufacturer of curry combs. Afterwards he engaged in the 
business of vise making on his own account, w^hich he continued 
till 1S82, when he gave it up, and began the manufacture of 
curry combs. 

He was of a very retiring disposition, rarely speaking unless 
spoken to, and of domestic tastes. He lived a quiet, uneventful 
life, and died in Philadelphia, 4]March, 1S96. in the eighty-first 
year of his age. 

Catherine Hoffman, wife of ]Moses iMansur, was born at 
Windsor Forge, Lancaster County, Penna., on 15 Jan., 1816. 
Her father's name v,;;s John Hoffman, and her motlier's name 
was Elizabeth Hamilton. 

She came to Philadelphia in 1S39. After the death of her 
husband in 1896, she removed to Royersford, Pa., and resides 
with her daughter, Annie Elizabeth Cahill. 



VI. 1-2-4-7-2. LuciNDA Mansur, daughter of Daniel Man- " 
sur, was born at Dracut, Mass., 19 Aug., 18 17. She never 
married but remained at home. Being a capital nurse, she 
was in great demand in case of sickness among the other 
members of the family. In the year 1846, she came to Phila- 
delphia to visit her brother Moses, remaining nearly a year. 
This was the only time she was away for any length of time, 
and ever since has quietly resided at the old homestead in Dra- 
cut, I^Iass., which was the home of the grandfather. 



VI. 1-2-4-7-4. William Mansur, son of Daniel, born 18 
Dec, 1821, at Dracut; died th^re 26 Feb., 1S79; married 30 
Dec, 1845, Jerusha Frances Hickok, of Middlebury, Vt. 

Children : — 

I-2-4-7-4-1. Mary Francis, born 8 Dec, 1846; died 7 April, 1847. 

1-2-4-7-4-2. Clara Inez, born 28 June, i8!^9; married Joseph Richardson. 

1-2-4-7-4.3. Myra Agnes, born 7 March, 185 1; married Edwin Richardson. 



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126 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

William Mansur, born at Dracut, Mass., was a machinist, 
and followed the trade for many years. In 1862 he bought the 
old homestead, and cultivated it until his death, which occurred 
26 Feb., 1879. He lived a quiet, retired life, and was held in 
high esteem by all who knew him. 

Jerusha Frances Hickok, wife of William Mansur, was 
born in Shoreham, Vt., but spent the first eighteen years of her 
life in Middlebury, Vt. She came to Lowell, Mass., in 1S3S, 
and resided there until her marriage in 1S45. She then removed 
to Methuen, Alass., where she lived about seventeen years, 
or till 1862, when her husband bought the old homestead at 
Dracut, IVIass., where she has since resided. 



VI. 1-2-4-7-5. Aaron Mansur, son of Daniel Mansur, was 
born at Dracut, Mass., 23 June, 1824. He learned the trade of 
carriage building and carried on the business in Haverhill, Mass., 
with his brother Charles. On 25 Feb.,iS5o, he disappeared, leav- 
ing nothing behind to sliovv what had become of him. His rel- 
atives were greatly alarmed, and made every effort by advertise- 
ment and otherwise to discover his whereabouts, but without 
avail. It remained a mystery for nearly eight years, when one 
morning he walked into the house of his brother Moses, in 
Philadelphia. After remaining a few days, he left, ostensibly 
to visit his folks in Dracut, Mass., but he never reached there 
and has never been heard of since. On 13 Feb., 1S58, he mar- 
ried Martha Jane Dollins, of Richmond, Ky., who after her 
husband's disappearance in 1S58, was married to Charles G. 
Renfro. 



VI. 1-2-4-7-6. Charles Mansur, son of Daniel, born at 
Dracut, 15 Jan., 1S27; died 21 Feb.,iS97; married 19 April, 
1849, Lucinda C. Whittier, of Haverhill, Mass. 

Children born in Haverhill: — 

1-2-4-7-6-1. Charles Kendall, born 27 Feb., 1850. 

1-2-4-7-6-2. George Henry, born 26 Oct., 1854. 

1-2-4-7-6-3. Moses Bailey, born 29 Sept., 1857; died i June, 1859. 

1-2-4-7-6-4. Frank Daniel, born 28 Aug., 1863. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 



127 



Charles Mansur learned carriage building, and after finish- 
ing in his trade, went to Haverhill, Mass., and established 
himself in business there, with his brother Aaron, continuing 
till his brother's disappearance, when he carried it on alone for 
many years. 

Like his brothers, he was of a retiring disposition, but had a 
large circle of friends, and possessed the entire respect of the 
community in w^hich he lived. He lived in Haverhill over fifty 
years, and died there 21 Feb., 1S97. 

LuciNDA C. WniTTiER, wifc of Charlcs Mansur, was born 
on 2 Feb., 1S32, in Haverhill, Mass. She is the daughter of 
William Whittier and Nancy Dunnels, both of Haverhill, Mass. 
She has lived all her life in Haverhill. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 
IPSWICH TERAl, MARCH, 1659. 

{Continued from page ij.) 



Allen, Capt. Thomas, of Salem, vs. Walter Taylor, of Salem, 
for debt. Samuel Archard, of Salem, Marshall ; (another war- 
rant for defamation). 

Taylor, Walter, of Salem, vs. Mr. (Capt. Thos.) Allen, of 
Salem, Master of ship " Thriver,'* for detaining the bedding, 
tools, etc., of s^ plaintiff. 

Alden, Capt. Thomas, of Salem, vs. Walter Taylor, of Salem, 
unjust molestation, to his great damage. 

(24) ■ 

Nick, William, of Marblchead, vs. Emanuel Clark, of A'larblc- 
head, molestation in closing his ground. Francis Johnson, of 
Marblehead, Justice ; Tho. Pittman, of Marblehead, Constable. 

NiCKE, William, of Marblehead, vs. Edmond Nicholson, of 
Marblehead, closing his lands. 16: 9: 1659. 

Taylor, Walter, of Salem, vs. Capt. Tho. Allen, of Salem, 
slander; calling his wife scurvy hore, etc. Samuel Archard, 
Jr., of Salem, Deputy Marshall. 

Carter, William, of Salem, vs. Nicolus Caley, of Salem, for 
refusing to perform a fishing voyage according to agreement. 
William Browne, of Salem, surety. Samuel Archard, of Salem, 
Marshall. 

Taylor, Walter, of Salem, vs. Capt. Thos. Allen, of Salem, 
for cruelly abusing and beating him. John Croad, of Salem, 
surety. Samuel Archard, Jr., Deputy Marshall. 

128 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 129 

Browne, William, of Salem, vs. John Andrews of Ipswich, 
debt due to George Corwin, of Salem. 

i 
(25) 

[57] MoNiNAH and MuNGALY of Lynn, formerly negro ser- 
vants of Capt. Bridges, of Lynn, vs. Samuell Bennitt, of Lynn, 
damage done to a mare with foal by falling into a pit dug 
by Benitt and left uncovered. Will. Longley, Justice ; 
Theophylus Baley, Constable. 

West, John, of Ipswich, vs. Corp'l John Andrews, of Ips- 
wich, forfeiture of a bond and not appearing in an action before 
Maj. Gen'l Denison. Nov. 17, 1659. 

Bishop, Thomas, of Ipswich, vs. John Chote, of Ipswich, 
debt. 

[58.] Batter, Edmond, of Salem, vs. Gabriel CoUens, of 
Marblehead, debt. 

Gedney, John, of Salem, vs. Humphrey Griffin, of Ipswich, 
debt. 

Norman, John, of Manchester, vs. Henry Baley and Thomas r .: 
Tuck, for taking away and detaining boards, John Archard, of 
Salem, deputy marshall. 

Roads, John, vs. Richard Woodus, of Boston, for taking 
away a parcel offish, Jonathan Negus, Justice. Rich. Wayte, of 
Boston, Marshall for Suffolk Co. 

(26) 

Harod, Henry, of Salem, vs. Walter Price, of Salem, debt 
for fish he received of William Nick, of Marblehead. Samuel 
Archard, Marshall. 

Story, William, of Ipswich, vs. Shoreborn Willson and John 
Smith, of Ipswich, for debt. 

Bishop, Thomas vs. Samuel Ingalls, debt, bill assigned to Job. 
Bishop, all of Ipswich. 

West, John, of Ipswich, vs. Mordicha Larckum, of Ipswich, 
for not delivering a heifer and cow according to agreement. 



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130 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

[60] Gedney, John, of Salem, vs, John Fuller, of Ipswich, 
debt. 

WiLLSON, Shoreborne, of Ipswich, vs. William Duglus, of 
Ipswich, non-performance of indenture in money, clothes, and 
tools. Edward Browne, of Ipswich, Marshall, attached land in 
hands of Robert Ducth. 

West, John, of Ipswich, vs. William White, of Ipswich, for 
debt. 

TuTTLE, Symon, of Ipswich, vs~, Joseph Jewett, for false im- 
prisonment. 9mo., 1659. 

(27) - ■ 

. Black, Daniel, of Ipswich, vs. Alexander Tompson, of 
Ipswich, debt. 

Presentments, Salem, Nov. Term, 1654. 

[61] HiBBARD, Joan, (of Beverly,?) wife of Robert, of Bev- 
erly, for accusing Zackary Herek, of Beverly, in that he went 
away- from the house of John Stone, of Beverly, at i or 2 o'clock, 
drunk. Henry Hereck, Jr., Liddia Grover, Marye Herreck, 
witnesses. 

Nicholson, Elizabeth, of Marblehead, wife of Edmund Nich- 
olson, of Marblehead, for absence from meeting. 

Maverek, Moyses, of Marblehead, magistrate. 

Pittman, Thomas, of Marblehead, constable. 

Leag (Legg), Eliz'th, of Marblehead, wife of John Leag, of 

Marblehead, saying if the people followed the preaching of Mr. 

Walton, of Marblehead, they would all go to hell. John Cod- 

• ner, Elizabeth Codner, Benjamyne Parmitter, all of Marblehead, 

witnesses. 

Price, Walter, of Salem, foreman of grand jury. 

Salem, 9mo., 1659. 

[62] CoNNANT, Seethe, of Salem, widow of Joshua Con- 
nant, of Salem. Inventory taken 28: 3: 1659, ^32: 6s. Mr. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 131 

Connant died in England. John Browne, Richard Prince, both 
of Salem, appraisers. 

(28) « 

[63] Norton, George, of Salem, his estate. Freegrace, 
John Norton, children of George, their petition concerning divis- 
ion of the estate. Mary Norton, widow of George. Freegrace, 
aged 24; John, aged 22; George, aged 18; Mary, aged 16; 
Mahittabell, aged 14; Sarah, aged 12; Hannah, aged 10 ; Abi- ' 
gaill, aged 8 ; Elizabeth Norton, aged 5, children and heirs of 
George Norton. 

[64] Norton, George, of Salem. Inventory taken Sept. 22, 
1659; ,^134: 11: 6d. John Porter, Jacob Barney, both of 
Salem, appraisers. 

[65] Shatswell, Richard, of Ipswich, presented for taking 
hay from Walter Roper, of Ipswich. 

Robert Punnell, of Ispwich, servant to Rich'd Shatswell : dep- 
osition. 

Walter Roper, of Ipswich, aged about 46 : deposition. John 
Kembalc, of Ipswich, named. 

Joseph Browne, of Ipswich, dep : advising Punnell to confess . , 
what he knew about Shatswell's theft. 

[66] Moore, James, of Lynn. Will made 1:1: 1659. 
To Dorothy Moore, his little daughter, he give one cow ; to Ruth 
Moore, his wife, residue of estate. Oliver Purchis, of Lynn, 
overseer of will. 

(29) 

[66] John Clarke, of Lynn, overseer of Moore's will. 
Joseph Jenckes, Sr., Joseph Jenckes, Jr., both of Salem, wit- 
nesses. 

[67] Moore, James, of Lynn. Inventory, ^66 : 8s. Jos- 
eph Jenckes, John Hathorne, both of Lynn, appraisers. 

[68] Porter, Samuel, of Salem. Will made 10: 10: 1658, 
being bound to the Barbadoes; pd. 28: 4: 1660. To Hannah 



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132 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Porter, his wife, gives half the farm ; to John, his son, the other 
half at Wenham. His father Porter, (John), of Salem, William 
Dodge, of Beverly, his father-in-law, and Edmond Batter, of 
Salem, overseers. . Edmond Batter, Sara Batter, both of Salem, 
witnesses. 

[69] Porter, Samuell, of Salem. Inventory taken 22 : 4 : 
i66o:;£"33i: 19s. House and land at Wenham bought of John 
Denham. William Nicols, debtor to estate. Roger Conant, 
John Rayment, of Salem, appraisers. 

[70] Chacksfield, John, of Lynn, or London, by his attor- 
ney, Joseph Armitage, of Lynn, vs. John Bex Sc Co., debt. 
[Co. of Boston, Bex of London.] Richard Wayte, of Boston, 
marshal, attached goods in hands of William Paine, of Boston. 

(30) . .''^■■/:kr -':.■■ 

' Richard Leader, of Lynn, statement that £^2 has been 

received on account of John Chaxfell, of London, as paid to 
himself and wife in London. Richard C[u]tts, William 
Osborne, both of Salem, witnesses. . 

William Aspinwall, Notary and Tabellion publick, by author- 
ity of General Court of the Massachusetts, Dec. 24, 1650. ■ 
i Mr. GifPards, of Lynn, affirmed 6:6: 1654, that Chackfell 

' did owe the Co. £^^0 or ^^42, when he was at Barbadoes. 

John Chaxson, of Lynn, appoints Joseph Armitage, of Lynn, 
his attorney, Dec. 24, 1650. Wm. Aspinwall, witness. John 
j Ballard, of Lynn, aged 25, dep., Nov. 28, 1650: about six 

/ months since saw John Chaxfield living in Barbadoes. 

l Daniell King, of Lynn, aged 27, dep: same as Ballard. 



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Warrants to Choose Jurors and Summons 
Persons Presented. 

[71] Stackhouse, Richard, of Salem, presented for abusing 
the wife of Francis Skerry. Nehemiah Howard, Henry Skerry, 
both of Salem, witnesses. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. . 133 

Gardner, wife of George, Needham, wife of Anthony, 

Shattuck, wife of Samuel, Sothwick, wife of John, 

Salmon, Samuel, Smith, wife of John, 

Wharton, Edward, Sothwick, Danyell, 

KiTCKEN, wife of John, Sothwick, Provided, 

BuFFUM, wife of Robert, Smale, John, 

Traske, wife of Henry, King, William. 

All of Salem, for absence from meeting on Lord's day. 
John Porter, Thomas Putnam, Nicolas Potter, Edmond Bat- 
ter, Roger Connant, Edward Bishop, witnesses. 

(31) 

Ellet, wife Wm., of Salem, for abusing wife of John Ray- 
ment, of Salem. Witnesses, John Rayment, wife of Edward 
Bishop. 

Clarke, Sarah, of Salem, for stealing. Witness, Tho. 
Putnam. Hillyard Veren, Clerk. Thomas Goldsmith, John 
Rayment, Tho. Roots, Constables. 

Edmund Batter, Hendry Skery, Joseph Boyce, Humphrey 
Woodbery, Sam. Corning, John Buffum, William Flint, all of 
Salem, Jury of Tryalls. 

Walter Price, Liftenant Lawthrop, Nath. Puttnam, Francis 
Skery, Tho. Spooner, Tho. Anthrum, Richard Bishop, all of 
Sr.lem, Grand Jury. 

Crafts, William, of Lynn, summoned, for a pound of bread. 
Witnesses, Danyell Salmon, Francis Burell. 

(32) 

Chadwell, Benj., of Lynn, not in town. - 

Bread, John, of Salem, for smoking tobacco near a house 
among combustible matter. Witnesses, Francis Burrell, Tho. 
Ivory ; Henry Rhodes, of Lynn, Constable. 

Olliver Purchase, Robert Mansfelld, Jarret Spencer, all of 
Lynn, Grand Jury. 

Edward Baker, John Mansfelld, John Person, William Longly, 



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134 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

all of Lynn, John Burrall, Trial Jury ; Theophilus Baley, Con- 
stable. 

[82] Smith, James, of Marblehead, summoned for absence 
from meeting. Witnesses, Thomas Pitman, William Charles, 
both of Marblehead. Thomas Pitmann, Constable. 

Mr. Goot, (Gott) of Wenham, Grand Juryman ; Richard 
Coye, of Wenham, Trial Juryman ; John Killim, of Wenham, 
Constable. 

Thomas Millett, of Gloucester, Grand Juror ; Clement Col- 
dams, of Gloucester, Trial Juror ; John Davis, of Gloucester, 
Constable. 

(33) 

[73] Clarke, Sara, of Topsfield, for stealing silk scarf from 
house of John Putnam, of Salem. Francis Heseltun and Daniell 
Clerke, of Topsfield, Constables. 

Gloucester, Town of, summoned for defect in their stocks. 

ViNCEN, wife of Wm., of Gloucester, summoned for disturb- 
ance in meeting. 

Steeveks, Mr. William, of Gloucester, for want of a bridge 
over the cut in his hands. Witnesses, John Pease, John Davis, 
William Vincen, Jeffery Persons, all of Gloucester. John Davis, 
of Gloucester, Constable. 

[74] Andover Births, Marriages, and Deaths. 

Chandler, Mary, of Andover, dau. of William and Mary, b. 
July 5, 1659. 

Engalls, (Ingalls) Mary, of Andover, dau. of Henry and Mary, 
b. Jan. 28, 1659. 

Osgood, Timothy, of Andover, son of John and Mary, b. 
Aug. 10, 1659. 

Barker, Steven, of Andover, son of Richard and Joanna, b. 
^ July 6, 1659. 

Chandler, William, of Andover, son of Tho. and Hannah, b. 
Aug. 28, 1659. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 135 

Parker, Samuell, of Andover, son of Joseph and Mary, b. Oct. 
14, 1659. 

Graves, Amy, of Andover, dau. of Mark and Eliz'th, b. June 
20, 1659. 

Chandler, William, and Deane, Mary, married Aug. 24, 1658, 
by Mr. Simons, of Ipswich. 

Russell, Robert, and Marshall, Mary, married July 6, 1659, 
by Simon Bradstreet. 

(34) 

Chandler, Thomas, of Andover, son of Thomas and Hanna, d. 
June 6, 1659. 

Young, Sara, of Andover, dau. of William and Sara, b. June 
6, 1659. 

Rowley Births. 

Brocklbank,Hannah, dau. of Samuel, b. March 28, 1659. 
Nelson, Phillip, son of Philip, b. April 16, 1659. 
Elsworth, Rebeckah, dau. of Jeremiah, b. March 2, 1659. 
Hobson, William, son of William, b. May 24, 1659. 
Tod, Mary, dau. of John, b. June 10, 1659. 
Remington, Thomas, son of Thomas, b. July 15, 1659. 
Hidden, Margreet, dau. of Andrew, b. July 28, 1659. 
Philips, George, son of Samuel, b. Nov. 13, 1659. 
Elithorp, Alary, dau. of Nathaniel, b. Jan. 4, 1659. 
Johnson, Elizabeth, dau. of John, b. Jan. 16, 1659. 
Kilborne, Isaac, son of George, b. Jan. 25, 1659. 
Law, John, son of William, b. March i, 1659. 
Pickard, Ann, dau. of John, b. Feb. 15, 1659. 

Rowley Marriages. 

Burkbee, Thomas, and Keller, Sarah, married April 15, 1659. 
Mighell, John, and Batts, Sarah, married July i, 1659. 
Nelson, Thomas, and Lambert, Ann, married Dec. 10, 1659. 
Crosbee, Anthony, and Waid, Prudence, married Dec. 28, 
1659. 



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136 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Rowley Burials. 

Dickenson, Thomas, son of Thomas, burled March 30, 1659. 
Lambert, Jalne, buried June 7, 1659. 
Hobson, William, buried July 17, 1659. 
Abbot, Thomas, buried Sept. 7, 1659. 

(35) 

Plats, Mary, buried Nov. 11, 1659. 
Dreser, Mary, dau. of John, buried Nov. 27, 1659. 
Stickney, Elizabeth, dau. of William, buried Dec. 4, 1659. 
Dreser, Jonathan, son of John, buried Dec. 10, 1659. 

Newbury Marriages. 

[75] Moody, Caleb, and Sara Peirce, married Aug. 24, 
1659. 

Bolton, William, and Denison, Mary, married Nov. 22, 1659. 

Roafe, Benjamin, and Hale, Aphia, married Nov. 3, 1659. 

Browne, John, and Woodman, Mary, married Feb. 20, i66o- 

Bingly, William, and Preston, Elizabeth, married P'eb. 27, 
1660. 

Bartlet, John, and Knight, Sara, married March 6, 1660. 

Newbury Deaths. 

Titcomb, William, d. June 2, 1659. 

Sawyer, Mary, dau. of William, d. June 24, 1659. 

Tharley, John, d. July 4, 1659. 

Tharley, Alary, dau. of Francis, d. Aug. 26, 1659. 

Bolton, Jane, wife of William, d. Sept. 6, 1659. 

Pike, Sara, dau. of John, d. Nov. 19, 1659. 

Cutting, Mr., d. Nov. 20, 1659. 

Bartlett, Jonathan, son of Christopher, d. Dec. 7, 1659. 

Morse, Timothy, d. Dec. 10, 1659. 

Woodman, Elizabeth, dau. of Edward, d. Dec. 27, 1659. 

Woodman, Edward, son of Edward, d. Dec. 27, 1659. 



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. ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 137 

(36) 

[75] Sawyer, Hanna, dau. of William, d. Jan. 20, 1659. 
Sawyer, Francis, son of William, d. Feb. 7, 1659. 

Newbury Births. 

Wallington, John, son of Nicholas, b. April 7, 1659. 
Noyes, Abigail, dau. of Nicholas, b. April 11, 1659. 
Coffin, James, son of Tristram, b. April 22, 1659. 
Blomfield, Ruth, dau. of Thomas, b. July 4, 1659. 
Webster, Sara, dau. of John, b. July 31, 1659. 
Titcomb, William, son of William, b. Aug. 14, 1659. 
Savory, William, son of Robert, b. Sept. 15, 1659. 
Wheeler, Nathan, son of David, b. Dec. 27, ^659. 
Roafe, Mary, dau. of John, b. Jan. 20, 1659. 
Short, Sara, dau. Henry, b. Jan. 29, 1659. 
Jackman, Richard, son of James, b. Feb. 15, 1659. 
Anthony Somerby, clerk for the town. 

[76] Miscellaneous Papers, Nov. Term, 1659. 

James Axsey, Capt. Thomas Marshall, Oliver Porchase, all 
of Lynn, chosen commissioners for Lynn. Theophilus Baley, 
of Lynn, constable. 

Chandler, John, bill of costs, cost of two men from Rox- 
bury to Boston, to give their testimony against Richard Sotten, 
Our feredg over ye watter forth and back, etc. 

Robinson, Elenor, her petition to General Court against 
Thomas James, for damages, 30: 9 : 1659. 

Rider, Richard, and Woodall, Mathew, fined for fighting 
and drinking. Wm. Hathorne, of Salem, magistrate. Sarah 

(37) 

Salmon, of Lynn, aged about 18, dep : — Fransis Boril, and Good- 
man CrofFts, both of Lynn, named in foregoing deposition. 
Thomas Marshall, of Lynn, constable. 



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138 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

[77] Stevens, John, of Andover, presented for some weak- 
ness that befell him at Ipswich — March Term, 1660. Andrew 
Foster, Sr., of Andover, dep. Simon Bradstreet, of Andover, 
Magistrate, 23 : i: 1659-60. 

Browne, Edward, of Ipswich, Will, Feb. 9, 1659-60 ; pd. 
27 : I : 1660. Thomas Browne, of Andover, his son, a gift 
from his (Thomas') aunt Watson, of England, and he (son) 
being dead, I account my son, Joseph Browne, of Ipswich, 
(under 21) his heir. Bartho. Browne, of Ipswich, brother of 
Jos. ; the latter to have 8 acres bought of him (Bartho). Faith 
Browne, wife, of Ipswich, executrix ; son John. (Daughters 
mentioned). Witnesses, Robert Lord, Thomas Lord, all of 
Ipswich ; Robert Lord of Ipswich, Clerk (and writer of the will). 
Inventory taken Feb. 20, 1659: £xi^^ 5: 7, by Moses Pen- 
gry and Robert Lord, of Ipswich, appraisers. 

Ipswich: May Term, 1660. 

[79] Fuller, John, of Ipswich, ^'J.John Leigh, for wound- 
mg an ox and killing a hog of Fuller's. John Chote, aged about 
30, and John Fuller, aged about 39, both of Ipswich, deps. Mr. 
Clarke, Thomas Lee, Simon Thomson, all of Ipswich, named 
in deps. 

(38) 

[80] Goodman Pod, of Ipswich, dep : Goodman BroWne, 
of Ipswich, named in dep. 

Thomas Low, Sr., of Ipswich, aged about 55, dep: Sarah 
Low, aged about 23, dep : Samuel Rogers named. 

Daniel Hovey, Sr., of Ipswich, aged about 42, deps.: Robert 
Lord, Clerk. 

John Choate, of Ipswich, aged about 32, dep. 

[81] John Dane, of Ipswich, dep. 

Samuel Lunt, of Ipswich, dep. Goodman Kimball and Good- 
man P[od?] named. 

[82] Samuel Eyres, (Ayers) of Ipswich, dep. 

Richard Nickalls, of Ipswich, dep. 






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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 139 

Samuell Rogers, of Ipswich, deps. 

John Browne, of Ipswich, deps. Goodman Pod, of Ipswich, 
named. 

[83] Thomas Burnham, or Ipswich, deps. 

Daniell Hovey, Jr., of Ipswich, aged 18, dep. 

Simon Tomson, of Ipswich, aged about 50. 

Robert Crosse, of Ipswich, dep : names his son Steeven. 

John Clarke, of Ipswich, dep. 

Robert Lord, of Ipswich, Clerk. 

[84] Clement, John, of Haverhill, estate. Robert Clement, 
of Haverhill, his acc't of charges in voyage to England and Ire- 
land in carrying his brother John's wife and children upon request 
of his brother Job. (See Ips. Court Rec, 1646 to 1666). 

(39) June Term, 1660. 

Browne, William, of Salem, assignee of Christopher Clark, 
of Boston, formerly assignee to John Jackson, of Boston, vs. 
John Wiswall and Hannah Munnings, administrators to estate of 
Mahalaled Munnings, of Boston, deceased, for not paying for 
the hire of the Ketch Rebecca^ either at Barbadoes or Boston. 

Rich. Worsley and Nathaniell Green, both of Barbadoes, testify 
that Jno. Jackson demanded of Mr. John Allen, of Barbadoes, 
merchant, freight for his ketch, and said Allen refused to pay 
said Jackson, etc. Mr. Wissell, his account. Mr. Joan Cartar, 
of Maderia, named in account. [85] Jonath. Negus, of Boston, 
justice. Rich. Wayte, of Boston, marshall. 

[86] John Jackson, master Ketch Rebecca now riding at 
anchor in Piscataqua, bound for Maderia Islands, Nov. 17, 1659. 
Rich. Holingworth, Phillip Gribble, both of Salem, witnesses to 
John Allen's statement. 

[87] Marke Kinge, aged 28, deposes. Richard Russell, 
magistrate. 

John Rainsford, aged 25, deposes. Anthony Stoddard, of 
Boston, magistrate, 25:4: 1660. [88] Jer. Houchin, com- 
niissioner. 



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140 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Rich. Worsley, of Barbadoes, Nathaniell Green, of Barbadoes, 
statement dated Barbadoes, March 9, 1659. 

[89] Bartholomew, Henry, of Salem, vs, Jacob Towne, 
of Topsfield, for detention of a mare. Samuell Archard, of 
Salem, marshall. June, 1660. 

(40) 

Jno. Wildes, of Topsfield, aged 40, dep : — former owner of 
the mare. 

Edmund Towne, of Topsfield, dep : — aided in marking said 
mare. Daniel Denison, of Ipswich, magistrate. Henry Bar- 
tholomew, of Salem, bill of costs. " V 

[90] William Nicolls, dep : — known the mare for two years. 

John Nicolls, aet. about 20, dep : — known "the mare for three 
years. 

[91] Francis Nurse, of Salem, dep: — saith that after my 
brothers Jacob Nurse and Isaac Nurse, of Salem, had some dis- 
course with Jossiah (Joshua ?) Raye, of Salem, about the mare 
my brother had lost, cominor with him from my house on a lec- 
ture-day and prayed him if he could by any means help him to 
the mare. He said he feared it was too late for she was sold and 
for aught he knew was on her way to the Barbadoes. 

Isack Estey, of Topsfield, deposes. Jacob Towne named as 
his brother (Isaac Estey married Mary, dau. of Wm. Towne, 
and sister of Jacob). 

Richard Mid[ ], deposes. 

John Lovet, William Ellet, Beverly ? depositions. 

Jeremy Hubberd, of Beverly, aged 28, dep : — had lived four 
years and upwards at house of Lieut. Lothrop, of Salem, who 
sold said mare to Bartholomew. -^ 

[92] John Gould, of Topsfield, deposes. 

Thomas Lowthroppe, of Salem, deposes. 

Willa Dixi (ensign), deposes. 

[93] William Towne, of Topsfield, deposes. 

John Putnam, of Salem, deposes. 

Mr. Peterse, Mr. Raye? his bonds. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 141 

(40 

Joshua Rea, of Salem, dep. 

William Cressy, of Salem, dep : same mare which Lieut. 
Lothrop, of Salem, sold Henry Bartholomy, of Salem. 

Joseph Towne, of Topsiield, aged 21, dep : John Wilds, of 
Salem, and Jos. Towne's brothers marked the mare. Depositions 
of Goodman Toun, of Salem, and p'ranses Nors, (Nurse) of 
Topsiield. Henry Bartlomew, of Salem, named. 

[94] Edmon Town, of Topsfield, aged 31, dep : Jacob 
Towne, of Topsfield, brother to Edmon, lost mare 3 years ago. 
Mester Bartellmue, of Salem, and John Wiles, of Topsiield, 
named. 

William Towne, of Topsfield, aged 60, dep : father to Jacob. 

(Thos.) Latrape, of Salem, Master to Mr. Barttellmue, Will. 
Cressey, of Salem, named. 

[95] Cromwell, Phillip, of Salem, vs. John Ruck, of Salem, 
witholding assurance of piece of land. Samuell Archarde, of 
Salerri, Marshall. April 2, 1660. Nathanell Putnam and Jno. 
Putnam, of Salem, will give ;{^20 for the land, said Cromwell 
bought of Ruck. 

John Putnam, old goodman (Rich'd) Hutchinson, and Joseph 
Hutchinson, of Salem, named in bill of charges. 

Thomas Cromwell, Sergeant (Thos.) Haile, Thomas Barnes, 
and Robert Prince, all of Salem, named in foregoing list of debts. 

Richard Huchensone, aged about 58, Thomas Hayle, aged 
about 50, Thomas Cromwell, aged about 43, Thomas Barnes, 
aged about 28, Joseph Huc-hensone, aged about 27, all of Salem, 
deps : concerning sale of the land. Mr. Cromwell bid £6 : 9s 
and odd pence for when the candle fell. 

[97] J^^" Putnam, (Jr.) of Salem, aged about 30, dep : 
names Mr. Gidings. 

[98] Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Barnes, both of Salem, 
deps. 

Laws of England respecting sales of land. 

[99] Barton, Edward, by his attorney Emanuell Cleark, vs. 



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142 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

William Nick, of Marblehead, for witholding house and 2 parcels 
of land several years from said Barton. 

Mary Chichester, wife of William Chichester, of Marblehead, 
dep : that her husband bought a house at M'h'd., said to be some- 
time before Edward Bartol's, which s'^ Chichester bought of 
David Heale, of Boston, agent to Israel Stoughton, and occupied 
s^ house two years and sold it about 14 years ago. 

Edmund Nicholson, of Marblehead, dep. 

Beniamen Parmitor, of Marblehead, dep : hired s'^ house of 
Barton and paid him 20^ a year rent. 

Moses Maverick, of Marblehead, dep : house and land in con- 
troversy, owned by Richard Hide, of Marblehead, who built it 
and had land of town of Marblehead. 

(43) 

[100] Richard Hide, of Marblehead, dep : — built the house 
and had half an acre of land given him by Marblehead, which 
house and land he changed with Edward Barton, of Marblehead, 
for house and land in Salem. 

[lOi] Beniamin Parmiter, of Marblehead, dep: — about six- 
teen years since the house of Edward Barton and the land was 
attached at sute of Israeli Stoughton, and after a while goodman 
(Robert) Elwell came to me, then living in said house and 
desired me to give way, that said Elwell might take possession 
for the use of Mr. Stoughton, v/hich I did, and said Elwell lived 
there for a while. 

Robert Elwell, dep : — concerning his attachment. 

[102] Brimbelcombe, John, of Marblehead, vs. Hester 
James, of Marblehead, slander, calling him whoremaster, rogue, 
etc. Francis Johnson, magistrate. 

Rebecka Conde, Rachell Codner, Elizabeth Skinner, all of 
Marblehead, above 20 years old, depositions. 

Hester James, of Marblehead, gives power of attorney to her 
brother, Erasmus James, of Marblehead, to prosecute her suite 
against John Brimblecom, of Marblehead, for slander. June 26, 
1660. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 143 

Johnson Mo [re] ombe, of Marblehead, witness. 

John Brimbelcom, of Marblehead, bill of costs. 

James, Hester, of Marblehead, vs, John Brimbelcombe, of 
Marblehead, slander, for saying that James Watts, of Marble- 
head, followed her as a dog followed a bitch. Francis Johnson, 
justice. 

Rebeca Conde, of Marblehead, aged about (30 ?), dep : — that 
James Watts, of Marblehead, came to her house, where Jno. 
Brimblecome was, who said, James, thee hast well don to come 
to New England, to runn after a wench as a dogg runs after- a 
bitch, etc. | 

James Watts, of Marblehead, aged about 35, dep : — same as 
above. 

(44) ' 

[103] Rachell Codner, of Marblehead, aged 20, deposes. 

Richard Read, of Marblehead, deposes. 

Jewett, Mr. Joseph, of Ipswich, attorney for Thomas Perry, 
of Ipswich, vs. John Godfry, of Ipswich, for witholding writings 
of said Perry, which are paid. Richard Littlehale, of Rowley, 
justice. Robert Lord, of Ipswich, marshall. April 3, 1660. 

Pendleton, Brian, of Ipswich, vs. John Newmarsh, of Ips- 
wich, and Thomas Perkings, of Ipswich, for debt. 

Godfry, John, vs. Richard Ormsby, of Salisbury, debt for 12 
bushels of wheat he promised to pay for a parcell of shoes delivered 
at the house of James Ordway, of Newbury, about two years 
ago. Anthony Somerby, of Newbury, justice. May 3, 1660. 
John Ilsby, of Newbury, constable. 

James Ordway and wife Annie, of Newbury, depositions. 

Anthony Somerby, of Newbury, deposes. Daniel Denison, 
of Ipswich, magistrate. June 25, 1660. 

Ormsbey, Richard, of Salisbury, bill of costs. * 

Hawkes, Adam, of Lynn, vs. Mr. William Panne (Paine), of 
Boston, and Company of undertakers of Lynn Iron Works and 
Oliver Purchase, of Lynn, agent, for overflowing his land. 
William Longley, of Lynn, justice. 



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144 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

(45) 

[106] Theophylus Bayley, of Lynn, Constable. 

Thomas Wellman and John Knight, both of Lynn, being 
chosen to appraise damages to Hawkes' land, give their dep. 

Charles Phillips, of Lynn, dep : keeper of the water works 
since Mr. Porchas, of Lyrvn, came ; charged to keep the water 
low and not damage Hawkes. 

Oliver Purchis, of Lynn, bill of costs. 

Maj. Wm. Hathorne, of Salem, Joseph Jencks, Sr., Henry 
Leonard, Jn° Vinton, Nicholas Pinnion, Macam Downing, 
Charles Phillips, Thomas Browne, Daniel Salmon, George Dar- 
ling, all of Lynn, named in bill of costs. 

[107] Jno. GifFord, of Lynn, agent for Ironworks for one 
party, and Adam Hawks, of Lynn, for the other party, their 
agreement made June 20, 165 1, respecting flowage. 

Capt. Robert Caine (Keayne) and Capt. Wm. Hawthorne, of 
Salem, arbitrators. Witnesses to agreement, John Jarvis and 
DanTell Salmon, of Lynn. 

[108] Joseph Jencks, Sr., of Lynn, dep. 

Thpmas Browne, Daniell Salmon, of Lynn, aged about 50, 
dep : — servant to the Iron Works under Mr. GefFards. Names 
Dexstor his marsh. 

(46) 

[109] Henery Leonard, of Lynn, aged 40, dep: — employee 
at Iron works under Oliver Purchis. 

Nicklis Pennion, of Lynn, dep. 

John Vinton, of Lynn, dep. 

Francis Hutchinson, of Lynn, dep. 

[no] Batter, Edmund, of Salem, w.-Ned, the Indian, of 
Lynn, debt. Samuell Archard, of Lynn, Marshall. 

Samuell Archard, Sr., of Lynn, dep. 

Edm. Batter, of Lynn, bill of costs. 

Godfrey, John, vs. William Holdridge, of Haverhill, debt, 
three years since. Anthony Somerby, of Newbury, Justice. 

[hi] James, Erasmus, of Marblehead, inventory allowed 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 145 

June 26, 1660. ^86: is: 8d. Francis Johnson and Moses 
Maverick, both of Lynn, appraisers. Witness, John Leg. 

Jane James, widow of Erasmus. 

Erasmus James, Jr., and Richard Read, both of Marblehead, 
named. 

Arthuer Sanden, of Marblehead, John Philhps, of Boston, 
Philipe Crumwell, of Salem, Mr. Maverick, of Marblehead, Fra. 
Johnson, of Marblehead, Richard Read, of Marblehead, Mr. Cor- 
wine, of Salem, creditors. 

(47) 

Gault, William, of Salem : Inv. taken April 21, 1660. Jef- 
ferie Massey, John Kitchin, both of Salem, appraisers. 

William Brown, George Corwin, Mr. (John) Pudney, Phillip 
Crumwell, John Porter, Jr., all of Salem. Mr. Bridgham, of 
Boston, Mr. Batter, of Salem, creditors. 

Rebecca Goult, of Salem, aged 19, Debora Goult, aged 
15, Sara Goult, aged 13, all of Salem, children of William. 

[113] NoRiCE, Rev. Edward, of Salem, will made Dec. 9, 
1657; P^* J^"^ ^7? 1660. Son Edward Ex'r. Dea. John 
Home, Dea. Richard Prince, both of Salem, overseers. Wit- 
ness, Walter Price, Elias Stilman, 

[114] Bradstreet, John, of Marblehead : Inv. taken June 
14, 1660. John Bartoll and Joseph Dalliver, both of Salem, 
appraisers. 

[i 15] ViNCEN, Sarah, of Gloucester, wife of William Vincen, 
of Gloucester, presented for words spoken to the teacher on 
Sabbath day. 

- John Pears, of Gloucester, aged 40, dep : — Said Sarah stood 
in the door-way of meeting house, with arms spread, hand on 
each door post and told the teacher when he came, if he had 
come to teach here he had better leave his head behind, etc. 

(48) 

[115] Sarah Vincen, of Gloucester, dep: — Reason why she 
made such remarks was, a few days before he said, if I come to 



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146 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

teach here as long as there is an abler man in town I will give you 
my head from my shoulders, etc. 

John Davice (Davis), of Gloucester, dep : — same as John 
Pears. 

[ii6] WooDROFFE, Ben., and Rebeca Canterbury, both of 
Salem, presented for fornication before marriage. William 
Canterbury surety for Rebecca. Joshua Ray , and John Har- 
wood, both of Salem, sureties for Woodroffe. 

SouTHWiCK, Lawrence, of Salem, his estate. His sons John 
and Daniell. 

William Robinson and Thomas Gardner, both of Salem, dep : 
that said sons made a fair agreement in division of their father's 
estate. 

CoNNANT, Josuah, of Salem, estate. Thos. Gardner, his bill 
charges to s^ estate. Richard Prince, Joseph Gardner, Mr. 
Browne, Mr. Cromwell, all of Salem, named in bill. 

[117] Hugh Jones, of Salem, dep : servant to Joseph Gar- 
ner. 

Phillip Cromwell, of Salem, his receipt from Ould Mr. Gard- 
ner, of Salem, June 10, 1659. 

Jane, wife of Robert Cotta, her receipt from Thomas Gardner 
for keeping Joshua Conant's sheep. 

Salem, 4mo., 1660. (49) 

[118] Stackhouse, Rich., of Salem, Mary, wife of Hugh 
Woodbury, of Salem, complained against. 

Rich. Stackhouse, of Salem, complained of by Mary Wood- 
bury for calling her a filthy, bob-tailed sow, whore, etc. 

Henry Bayley, of Salem, said that Stackhouse called him 
knave. "' 

Ralph Elenwood, of Salem, saith he and his wife being together, 
Stackhouse said there goes a whore and a rogge. Tho. Tuck, 
and Sam'll Corning, both of Salem, named. 

Stackhouse, dau. of Rich., of Salem, says Mary Woodbury 
gave her abusive words and struck her with a broome. 

Mr. Cromwell, of Salem, says that being at Stackhouse's 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 147 

house to get passage over the ferry, said Stackhouse delayed and 
gave her many abusive words. 

Ensign (Wm.) Dixie, of Salem, surety for appearance of 
Marye Woodberie, of Salem, his dau. at next Court. 

Wife of Hugh Woodbury, of Salem, and Richard Stackhouse, 
of Salem, are agreed if the Court will release their bond. 

Thomas, James, of Salem, vs. Owen Williams, for striking 
him. Alester Mackmallen, of Salem, witness. 
" Ed. Woollen, of Salem, promises to pay William's fine. 

John Raymont, sworn constable, 14: 3: 1660. 

[i 19] Batter, Edmond, of Salem, presented for saying that 
Elizabeth Kitchen, of Salem, had been pawawing and calling her 
base quaking slut, etc., meeting her as he supposed, coming from 
a quaking meeting. 

John Ward, of Salem, dep : — aged about 20, and Tho. Meek- 
ens (Mekings), of Salem, dep : — aged about 18, they being with 
Mr. Batter and Thomas Rootes, of Salem, near Strong Water 
Brook, saw them who, meeting wife of John Kitchen, of Salem, 

(50) 

riding on a horse, go up and take her horse by the bridle and 
bade her come off her horse ; having refused to comply they 
pulled her and the man that was before her off the horse and took 
it from them and said Rootes rid away the horse and Mr. Batter 
told the woman, she had been a powowing and called her base 
quaking slut, etc. 

Phillip Cromwell, of Salem, aged about 48, dep : — was present 
with Thomas Rootes, of Salem, when they met Elizabeth Kit- 
chin, of Salem, horseback. Batter did not touch her or use the 
word base, nor were they angry. 

Thomas Meakins and John Ward, of Salem, stood about four 
or five pole away. 

Haskcull, Roggers, of Salem, constable, vs, Zecharia Her- 
rick, of Salem, for abuse. 

John Reymond, of Salem, aged about 38, deposes. Edmond 



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148 V;" ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Grover, Ousman Trask, Zechariah Herrick, Joseph Harrlse, all 
of Salem, deps : — named. 

Ousmone Traske, of Salem, dep : — aged about 35. 

Edmond Grover, of Salem, dep : — aged about 60. Mr. Cor- 
wine, of Salem, named. 

Joseph Harrlse, of Salem, aged 30, dep : — salth that Roggei 
Haskcull, of Salem, four or five years since demanded five shill- 
ings of me again after it was paid, towards the meeting house. 
Henry Herrick, Jr., and Mary, wife of Zackery Herrick, deps : 
— that Joan Hibbard said that Lyda and Mary Grover weare the 
veryestt lyers on Bass River, aud thatt they ware able to ly the 
divell outt of hell. 



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/ - 
AMERICAN PRISONERS AT QUEBEC DURING THE 

REVOLUTION. 

From the Haldimand Papers, British Museum, Add. Ms. 



Return of Rebel Prisoners at Quebec, June 27, 1778. 

Lt.-Col. John Belinger, aged 50, residence, Mohawk River, 
N. Y., taken at Fort Stanwix. 

Maj. of Brig. John Fry, aged 35, residence Mohawk River, 
N. Y., taken at Fort Stanwix. 

Capt. John Martin, aged 30, residence Schenectady, N. Y., 
taken 2 Aug., 1777, near Fort Stanwix. 

Capt. Bailey Fry, Lt. Nehe. Lovell, Lt. John Powell, these 

three came from Connecticut River as a flag: of truce. 

Chas. Campbell, aged 27, Geo. Campbell, aged 23; Randal 

Lauchlin, aged 30 ; John Gibson, aged 26 ; David Dixon, aged 

25, residence Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania, taken 25 Sept., 

near Fort Pitt. 

Levy Churchill, aged 18, residence Huhberton, Hampshire; 

Sam'l Claverack, aged 50, Boston, Mass. ; Isaac Calcott, 50, 

born in England; Silas Spratt, aged 18, Pownal, N. H. ; Tho. 

Bickford, aged 21, Arundel, IMass. ; Dan'l Home, aged 23, 

Dover, N. H. ; Jacob Stackwell, aged 28, Sheffield, Mass. ; 

Oliver Bacon, aged 22, Rye, N. H. ; John Webber, aged 40, 

Wells, N. H. ; Wm. Gordon, aged 25, Exeter, N. H. ; Eph. 

Taylor, aged 19, Newcastle, Mass. ; John Askett, aged 19, 

Gorham, Mass. ; Israel Rowell, aged 25, Salem, Hampshire ; 

Simon Bacon, Sergt., aged 50, Woodstock, Mass. ; Thos. Foss, 

aged 19, Newmarket, N. H. ; Athol. Yeager, aged 24, Mohawk 

River, N. Y., all taken 7 July, at Hubberton. 

Geo. Long, a negro. 

149 



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150 AMERICAN PRISONERSAT QUEBEC. 

Dan'l Denne, aged 26, residence Westfield, Mass., taken on 
9 July at Fort Ann. 

At the Hospital. 

Solomon Obins, aged 3, residence Newbury, Mass., taken at 
Fort Ann. 

Bernard Divine, aged 26, residence N. Y., taken at Castle- 
town. 

Parole of Captured Frivateersmex. 

We, the undermentioned persons, being prisoners of war at 
this place and through the Humanity of His Excellency the 
Commander-in-Chief released from confinement, * * * prom- 
ise * * * not to attempt to escape from the place assigned for 
our residence, where we shall appear once every 24 hours before 
whoever shall be appointed. 

We promise not to aid others in making their escape (or to) 
report anything tending to the prejudice of the British Govern- 
ment. * * * to be mutually responsible for the conduct of each 
other. Qjiebec, 30 Aug., 17S0. v 

Putnam Cleaves, Captain of ye Harlequin.* 

William Graves, Captain of ye Eagle, j 

John Tnorson, ist Lieut. 

Benj. Chapman, ist Lt. of ship Jack (died 15 Sept., 

17S0.) 

, Jona. Harris, 2d Lt. of ye Eagle. 

Thos. Downing, 2d Lt. of ye Eagle. 

John Parvin, ist Lt. of ye Harlequin. 

Adam Ravel, 2d Lt. of ye Harlequin. 

Samuel Daland, Master of ye Harlequin. 

Abraham Row, 2d Lt. of ye America. 

Ebenezer Tarbox, Prize Master. 

Samuel Hildroth, Doctor of ye Harlequin. 

Jacob Oliver, Master of the Brig Eagle. 

Aaron Lee, Prize Master, Brig Eagle. 
Paul Foster, Prize Master, Brig Eagle. 

*The Harlequin undoubtedly sailed from Salem or Beverly. 
fPerhaps from Marblehead. 



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. AMERICAN PRISONERS AT QUEBEC. 151 

John Melvill, Prize Master, Brig Eagle. 

Nathan Brown. 

Daniel Foster, mate of the Harlequin. fo. 88, 



List of Men, All [of New York, Taken Prisoners at 

New Haven, Otter Creek, and Near Crown 

Point, In Nov., 1778. — Quebec, Dec, 1778. 

Justice Stuidisant, aet. 37 ; Winter Howell, 39 ; Adonijah 
Griswold, 20; David Griswold, 17; Elias Roberts, 42; Nathan. 
Grizzel, 22; Duncan Roberts, 15; John Bishop, 21; Timothy- 
Bishop, 17; Claudius Brittall, 16; another Claudius Brittall^ 
47 » John Bishop, 48; Clark Store, 15; John Griswold, 27; 
Isaac Benners, 35 ; Derrick Webb, 48 ; Philip Spalding, 23 ; 
John Ward, 17; Thos. Sandford, 39; Squire Ferrers, 14; 
Peter Ferrers, 53; Geo. Spalding, 17; Joshua Hokam, 22; 
John Oaks, 23 ; Hordel Squire, 56 ; Marshall Smith, 23 ; Mar- 
tin Smith, 26; Isley Squire, 17; Benj. Pain, 31, was prisoner 
in Canada last war and made his escape ; Phineas Holkum, 52 ; 
Phineas Holkum, Jr., 27; Jos. Holkum, 16; Elisha Holkum, 
15 ; David Ston, 42 ; James Bedington, 24 ; Benj. Webster, 38 ; 
Joreal. Aves, 18; Isaac Kelloch, 23, on board the Carlton 
schooner, 5 Aug. ; Joseph West, 23. fo, 20. 



Return of Rebel Prisoners, 15 Nov., 1778, Showing 
Age, Residence, Date, and Place of Capture. 

Jona Maynard, Lt., aet. 25, Framingham, Mass. ; 30 May, 
1778; at Cobleskill, 47 miles above Albany. 

Josiah Dickson, 24, Pittsburg, Va. ; 25 Dec, '76, in Ohio, 
by Indians ; born in Scotland. Not in arms. 

John Ellis, 37, East Town, Penn. ; 7 Aug., '78, Cocketockin, 

Delaware.* Not in arms. 

Timo. Dory, 22, Westmoreland, Conn.; 22 Aug., '78, Sus- 
quehanna, Delaware. 

Jas. Whitney, 36, Dunstable, Mass. ; 5 June, Susquehanna, 
Delaware. 

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152 AMERICAN PRISONERS AT QUEBEC. 

Timo. Pearse, 39, Westmoreland, Conn.; 6 June, Susque- 
hanna, Delaware. 

Jos. Budd, 22, Long Island; 6 June, Susquehanna, Delaware. 

Stephen Kimball, 20, Preston, Conn.; 4 July, Del. Riv., 
Delaware. 

Jas. Calloway, 22 ; Bedford, Va. ; 8 Feb., on Ohio. In arms. 

Jas. Cooler, 19, Springfield, Mass. ; 30 May, Coberskell, 
Delaware. 

Jona Johnson, 20, Westford^ Mass. ; 30 May, Coberskell, 
Delaware. 

Cornelius Kuf, 20, Georgetown, Mass. ; Susquehanna, 20 
June, Coberskell, Delaware. 

John Benjamin, 20, Northumberland, Pa. ; Susquehanna, 
Delaware. 

John Harper, 17, "^ Eckwith, N. H. 

Sam'l Harper, 21, >- Deserted from Rebel Army 

Thos. Harper, iS, j at White Plains, 8 Aug. 

Fr. Campbel, 48, Albany, N. Y. ; 20 Sept., Ft. Stanwix. 
Not in arms. 

Peter Seats, ^^^ Mohawk river; 3 June, Mohawk River. Not 
in arms. 

Andrew Sherard, 19, Westmoreland, Conn. ; 11 July, Lacka- 
wack River. Not in arms. 

Michael Lighthorn, 25, Mohawk River; 18 July, Mohawk 
River. Not in arms. 

Jas. Pluff, 42, Westmoreland, Conn. ; 3 July, Lackawack. 
River. Not in arms. 

John Frank, 40, Mohawk River; 18 July, Mohawk River. 
Not in arms. 

Lawrence Frank, 27, German Flatts ; 31 Aug., German 
Flatts. Not in arms. . ., 

Dan. Walling, 22, Westmoreland, Conn. ; 5 June, Susque- 
hanna. Not in arms. 

. John M'Phattage, 21, Westmoreland, Conn.; 22 Aug. Not 
in arms. 

John Kertell, 25, Westmoreland, Conn. Gave himself up at 
/ Oswegatchie ; was formerly a soldier in Royal Americans, but 

obtained his discharge. fo. 75. 

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GLEANINGS* FROfl THE TOWN MEETING AND 
SELECTflEN'S RECORDS OF SALEM, flASS., 

1659-1682. 

Volume L of the Town Records of Salem was printed entire 
from a copy made by William P. Upham, in the Historical Col- 
lections of the Essex Institute, for 1869. The Book of Grants 
I had previously been printed in Volumes V., VL, VIL, of the 

I same Collections, from a copy made by Perley Derby. The 

' Book of Grants begins i Oct., 1634; the Town Records, 26 

Dec, 1636. Mr. Upham used the grants to supply certain miss- 
ing portions of the Town Records, as the Book of Grants is a 
series of transcripts from the Town Records. The latest record 
in Volume L is dated 7 Nov., 1659 > ^^^ earliest in Volume IL 
is 29-9th mo., 1659, b^i^g ^h^t o^ ^ town-meeting. 



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29-9, 1659. Maintenance of the minister for the next year 
shall be by voluntary contributions into the deacon's charge, / 
• and those that will not so contribute shall be rated by the select- 
men. Ordered to be a house built for the ministry. The 
I Widow Denis is allowed eight pounds for the next year and three 

pounds behind due her. Widow Jackson is allowed a small 
weekly pension. Liberty is granted to Mr. William Browne, 
Mr, Corwine, and Mr. Price to build a grist mill upon the south 
river above Mr. Ruck's house, where it may be convenient. 

*From miscellaneous sources, consequently accuracy in the transcription 
of names and dates, while presumably correct, cannot be guaranteed by the 
Editor. Matters alluded to by P'elt in * 'Annals of Salem" are usually 
omitted. 

153 



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154 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

Liberty is granted to Thomas Hales to build a shop adjoin- 
ing the meeting house* where the selectmen may appoint, and 
enjoy it at the town's pleasure. Mr. William Browne and Mr. 
Corwine are desired to agree with carpenters for the building of 
the minister's house. f 

14-10, 1659. Agreed with our brethren and neighbors of 
Cape Ann side, in reference to maintenance of the ministry : 
bounds ; from the east side Bass river to the swaiyip that runs out 
of Lawrence Leech's meadow, where it will meet with Wenham 
line and so to Manchester bounds, provided they maintain their 
poor, and make and maintain the highways within the said limits, 
and so be free from all charges about our poor or highways, all 
ordering of fences shall be made by the selectmen in being, and 
if there be no selectmen on their side they have liberty to make 
choice of two or three of themselves to join with the selectmen 
in the premises above said. 

14-1, 1659-60. The selectmen appoint Sgr. John Porter and 
Thomas Putnam, suveyors of the highway for county way from 
the bridge to Crane river. 

3-2, 1660. John Southwick brought into this town Joseph 
Nicholson's wife, a pregnant woman, i8th March last. He is 
to clear the town of her. 

I May, 1660. Henry Herrick and Benjamin Balch fined 
for entertaining Nicholas Dickap. Nicholas Dreckan admitted 
an inhabitant. 

8 May, 1660. John Sampson admitted an inhabitant provided 
he bring his wife. Mr. William Haynes, a tailor from Virginia, 
admitted an inhabitant. 

15-3, 1660. In regard to Lord's land ^ * * "what else 
about his house or houses that lyeth unfenced, confirme to him 
that land that is granted to him upon condition, in the year 16-5, 

*Mr. Higginson's house was erected on land given to the town in 
exchange, by Goodman Rumble. 

•j-Richard Harve, tailor, had the privilege of mending the little house 
adjoining to the meeting house for use as a shop, three months before. 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 155 

1638, as also ten acres of land to be layed out to him in some 

place above Thomas — farme and so toward Mr. 

Downing's farm." 

13-6, 1660. John Loomes' petition for a small enlargement 
to his house, near to Edward Gascone, is referred to Sgt. John 
Porter and Edmund Batter to lay out, who reported 6 Nov., 
1660, "have laid out to him from his new dwelling house about 
fifteen rods between the two ways toward the town of Salem." 

Constable for Cape Ann side, Edward Bishop. 

Clement Salmonds admitted an inhabitant. 

8-11,1660. Tymothy Lindall admitted an inhabitant. Agreed 
with Mr. John Ruck for entertaining Mr. Higginson with his 
horse, ;^I0 by the year as long as he shall live in the house. 

1660. Joseph Miles tined for entertaining a Scot, a stranger, 
several weeks. John Ballard, the Frenchman, mentioned. Richard 
Hutchinson having been formerly granted a parcel of land 
between Mr. Thorndike and Mr. Stileman's farms in con- 
sideration of the hire of a bull one summer to have the whole 
of it, if said land does not exceed twenty acres. Sgt. John Porter 
and Jacob Barney, Sr., appointed to be surveyors of the highway 
between Frost-fish river and Horsebridge as you go to Ipswich. 

1661. Grant to Mr. Higginson of swamp in the common 
near Mr. Stileman's field and six acres in the great neck near 
Mordecai Croade's new dwelling. 

26-6, 1 66 1. Granted to Sgt. John Porter the way upon Mr. 
Sharpe's hill in consideration of the way now which goes on this 
side of the hill. 

27-10, 1661. John Butolphe, tanner, received as an inhabi- 
tant. William Lake received as an inhabitant. 

20-11, 1 66 1. Matthew Price admitted an inhabitant provided 
he buys a house to dwell in. 

Charles, son of Lt. Turner, of Boston, admitted an inhabitant. 

24-1, 1662-3. Thomas Longbottom admitted an inhabitant. 

22-6, 1663. J^h" Putnam chosen selectman. 

26-6, 1663. William Smith and Isaac Hull admitted as 
inhabitants. 



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156 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

8-8, 1663. Capt. Corwine to see the meeting house is 
repaired, viz., that the wall at the south end and where it need- 
eth be daubed and the windows meaded, and it be ground silled 
where there is need. 

26-6, 1664. Lt. Putnam chosen commissioner to join with 
the selectmen for making the rates this year. 

13-10, 1664. Rowland Powell admitted an inhabitant. 

Thomas Fraser, a joiner, entertained by Sgt. James Browne. 
. John Crabtree, joiner, staying with Mr. Gedney. 

21-12, 1664. John Buxter admitted an inhabitant and to 
improve the trade of a translator. - 

10-9 mo., 1665. Joseph Phippeny admitted an inhabitant. 

1665 and earlier. Thomas Putnam styled Lieutenant. 

1666. The meeting house to be a watch house till another 
is built. 

25-10, 1666. The inhabitants about Will's Hill request a 
way to Salem town. The selectmen vote they shall make pro- 
vision this winter for a way and Thos. Putnam and Sgt. Fuller 
are appointed to treat with the selectmen of Andover who desire 
the same. 

19-1, 1667. Edmund Batter is appointed to treat with the 
magistrate of this county about a bridge to be made over the 
river in Andover road. v 

16-9, 1667. Selectmen to repair the meeting-house. 

19-11, 1667-8. In answer to request of Mr. Edward Norice 
the town grants him three pounds to build a chimney in his 
school-house and five pounds for teaching of children for the 
year ensuing. 

In answer to William Lord " he is already paid for the land 
on which the meeting-house doth stand and about the meeting- 
house and he may take what further course he seeth good." 

ii-i, 1668. Mr. Edmund Batter is empowered to see the 
meeting-house repaired and to order who shall sit in the seats at 
the south end and both above and below the gallery where the 
chimney was formerly. * 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 157 

24-4, 1668. Michael Combs admitted an inhabitant. 

8-5, 1668. Richard Waters is allowed to sell beer and ale in 
his house by retail. ^ 

12-8, 1668. A highway to be laid out beyond Frost-fish 
River at the most convenient place for landing at the salt water. 
Sgt. Leach and William Flint to lay it out and judge of damages 
to proprietors.* 

7-8, 1669. Corwine to repair meeting-house. 

21-12, 1669. Selectmen call a town meeting for 7th March 
next, to consider building a new meeting-house. John Grafton 
and Joshua Ward, having lately suffered shipwreck, have their 
last year's rates remitted. 

7-1, 1669-70. It is left to the selectmen to prepare their 
thoughts in order to the building of a new meeting-house or to 
fit up the old, and all things in reference to the business, and 
present it to ^he town on the first Tuesday in April, and in the 
meantime to repair meeting-house for it is of necessity. 

5 April, 1670. Ordered there shall be a new meeting-house,t 
60 feet long, 50 feet wide, and about 20 feet high in the stud, 
and set up at the west end of the old meeting-house toward the 
prison. Cost not to exceed ;£"iooo. Committee, Mr. William 



*This road was covered by bars or gates in 167a. 

+The new meeting-house had three pairs of stairs, three great doors which were 
ordered to be shut before the service is ended, and none to leave till service is 
over. A door was at the north end, flanked by stairs on both sides. Mr. Hig- 
.ginson's pew was the first on the west side of the north door next the stairs. 
Nearly corresponding to this location on the east side of the doors was Samuel 
Gardner's pew. On the west side north of the door were the pews of farmer Por- 
ter, John Buck, Sr., Bartholomew Gedney. South of the west door were pews 
of Major Hathorne, PJdmund Batter, Capt. W. Price, Mr. John Corwine, Mr. 
VercD, Sr., for his wife, Mrs. Emery, Mrs. Norris. East of the northern door 
were those of Mrs. Joseph Grafton, Jr., Mrs. Nathaniel Grafton. On the east 
side in the first place on the north side of the east door was Mr. Endicott, then 
Mr. James Brown, Mr. John Turner (on the north side of the cast window). 
South of the east door were William Brown, Sr., Capt. George Corwine, William 
Brown, Jr., and Dr. Weld. In the west gallery were seated Eleazer Gedney's wife, 
Sgt. John Pickering, Mr. Richard Hollingworth. 









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158 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

Brown, William Browne, Sr., Capt. George Corwlne, Edmund 
Batter, and Mr. Bartholomew. 

5-5, 1670. John Rowen and Thomas Howard received as 
inhabitants. 

18-5, 1670. Mr. Daniel Epps to be schoolmaster for one 
year and to have twenty pound in such pay as may be suitable, 
and the schoolmaster to have beside half pay from all scholars of 
the town and whole pay from strangers. 

12-7, 1670. Committee appointed to finish agreement with 
John Fiske to build the meeting-house and to carry on the work. 
Committee appointed to see if a better way can be found to 
Andover and view the way already laid out. 

23-9, 1670. Timber felled above a month on the town com- 
mons allowed to John Fisk for use of the meeting-house. 

25 March, 167 1. Andover road still a matter of dissatisfac- 
tion. ; 

To Mr. Daniel Epps for keeping school, ;;^20. 

29 Aug., 167 I. Walter Doleman and Samuel Stevens received 
as inhabitants. 

Capt. James Smith, of Marblehead, entertained the sick peo- 
ple at his house on Castle Hill for which he has 30 shillings 
from Salem. , 

25 Sept., 1 67 1. Edmond and Benj. Ashby admitted inhabi- 
tants. 

II Nov., 1 67 1. John Smith, mason, admitted inhabitant. 

20 Dec, 1 67 1. John Launder requests a house lot in the 
common against William Curtis, he paying for it as others have 
done. 

Robert Prince was frequently constable. 

16 Jan., 167 1. ^1-18. to Daniel Andrews for keeping 
school in his house and for mending the schoolhouse that now is. 

7 July, 1 67 I. Town chooses Mr. Daniel Epps to keep a gram- 
mar school for year ensuing ; selectmen to arrange his salary. 
Mr. Edward Norise to have ;^io toward his maintenance out of 
the town rates. 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 159 

5 April, 1672. John Launder, Nicholas Manning for his son- 
in-law, Joseph Grey, James Symonds, Nathaniel Silsby, Peter 
Cheever have each a house lot granted them at five pounds. 
Launder's lot to be next Manesses Maston, the others in order 
named. 

8 May, 1672. Mr. Emery, Matthev^^ Prise, Francis Collins, 
Matthew Nixon, Wm. Smith, John Best, Eleazer Eaton, Nath'l 
Hun, George Wiatt, Geo. Cross, John Petherick, Matthew 
Woodwell, prohibited to frequent ordinaries or to spend their 
time and estates tipling. A list of their names was given Mr. 
Gedney and Mr. Joseph Gardner. This notice was renewed 8 
May, 1673, ^^ which time Collins was released from the prohi- 
bition and Giles Lee, John Mason, William Holis, Humphrey 
Combs, and Mordecai Crawford included. 

7 Aug., 1672. Homan admitted an inhabitant. 

12 Nov., 1672. John Bull, a lame man, of Lynn, at John 
Proctor's, is warned. 

1672. John Robinson, the tailor, has liberty to build a house 
on the common. 

20 Dec, 1672. Mr. Edward Norise to have ^10 for teach- 
ing as a grammer schoolmaster, 17 July, 1672, for one year. 

28 Jan., 1672. ;^6-5-o8 allowed to Dan^ Epps to date when 
he went out of town. To Mr. Norice for keeping school, ;^io. 

15 April, 1673. Samuel Getchcll admitted an inhabitant. 

24 Sept., 1673. Jo^" Gilman allowed to live in town for one 
year, but not to have any privilege on the town's common except 
to cut some timber for making wheels. 

27 Dec, 1673. T^^^ Selectmen in accordance with the col- 
ony law that children not brought up in some honest calling and 
taught to read, direct that John Blith's children, Alister Mack- 
maly's children be put out to William Smith, John Glover, and 
Thos. Greenslade. • 

3 Jan., 1673. f*^'^ ^^- Gedney for provisions about raising 
the meeting-house, ^17. 

23 Jan., 1673. "The meeting house rate is thus divided among 



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i6o ^ SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

the constables: John Marston, ^164.05, Christopher Babbadge, 
;^I50, John Pease, ;/;i55.07. 

24 Feb., 1673-4, Peter Joyes children put out to " sarvis," 
Farmer Porter, Sr., takes the boy; Joseph Porter, the girl. 

2 March, 1673. John Nurse, John Foster, Richard Richards, 
Henry Wilkins, Sam'l Steevens, John Green, take the oath of 
fidelity. 

7 March, 1674. Henry Keny to make a sufficient cart way 
over the bridge at Beaver dam. 

18-3, 1674. Thomas Lemeer, a Jersey man, admitted inhabi- 
tant for one year. 

19—2, 1674. ;^io to Mr. Norise in consideration of his 
keeping school in his own house. 

18—6, 1674. Lt. Putnam to see that the bridge over Ipswich 
river and the one at Beaver dam be mended. 

18-6, 1674. Thomas Clark admitted an inhabitant. 

24-(8 ?), 1674. Selectmen instructed to lay out site for new 
meeting-house on the common at the upper end of Mr. Bartholo- 
mew's and Thomas Roote's land. 

It is voted that Mr. Nicholet is to remain through his life. 

10—9, 1674. Town house to be set up by the prison, and 
William Dounton to raise it with what speed he can. 

9-12, 1674. Thomas Fuller, Sr., admitted an inhabitant and 
with his consent, his whole farm to belong to Salem. He is 
engaged to make a sufficient cart way over Beachy brook, which 
being done he is to be allowed his whole meeting-house rate that 
was formerly rated. 

22 Jan., 1674. Mr. Philip Cromwell has taken Thomas 
Robinson for his servant for one year. 

20 Mar., 1675. Corporal John Putnam, one of the select- 
men. I 

April 26, 1675. Captain John Putnam chosen one of the 
jury of trials. ; 

7-7, 1675. Selectmen lay out 100 feet each way for new 
meeting-house. The selectmen of Salem being appointed by the 






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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. i6i 

General Court to divide the foot company of Salem, have done 
as follows : — 

The lower company's westernmost bounds to begin at John 
Prince's, thence from Reuben Guppy's to John Guppy's and so 
downward to Mordecai's neck. Joseph Gardner being appointed 
by the court their chief commander. 

The second company's bounds extended from the western 
bounds of the lower company, to Glasshouse, Northfields, and 
including inhabitants of Salem, at Royal side. Joseph Gatchell, 
drummer. Sergeants Leach and Felton are appointed to the upper 
company. Sergeants Pickering and Swinnerton have liberty 
which company to take. Mr. Gedney's appointed as a place of 
entertainment for the upper company. 

22-7, 1675. James Powland chosen gunner of ye town for 
the managing and ordering of the great artillery, to sec that the 
guns are made fit for service, etc., vice Nathaniel Pickman, dis- 
charged. 

ii-ii, 1675. Mr. Neale, Jr., Jenkins Williams, George In- 
gerson and family admitted inhabitants. Martha Barton, Good- 
wife Stanford, Edw. Sheaner, John Elson, John Ingerson, John 
Wallis, Walter Mear, Arter Wormstead, Wm. Frost, George 
Ingerson, Jr., Arter Hcwes, Goodman Gibbs, Symon Bouth, 
Walter Penewell, Gyles Ebbens, John Skillen, Elizabeth Wal- 
field, Humphrey Cacc admitted inhabitants during the time of the 
Indian wars, being driven from their habitations and having pro- 
vision for themselves and families for one year. 

14-12, 1675. Old Goodwife Hollingworth admitted by 
Humphrey Woodbury, Sr., into his cottage and he agrees to sup- 
port her; but if he (dies) she is to be admitted an inhabitant. 

1675. David Fogge, William Webb adm. inh., also Jenkins 
Williams and George Ingarson's family. 

2 Jan., 1676. Mr. Dpunton is credited £i().0'] for building 
the town-house frame and plank and work on the prison. 

9~i, 1676. Samuel Wakefield admitted an inhabitant. Henry 
Skerry, Sr., and Samuel Archer gave bonds that he would be no 
charge to the town. 



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1 62 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

18-1, 1676. John Pickering has a grant of land about Har- 
dy's Cove to build vessels upon for the prejudice done him by 
stopping the river at the milldam. 

April, 1676. Selectmen empowered to remove the prison and 
set it in another place ; they are also to agree with any one for 
the finishing of the town-house. 

16 April, 1676. Elisha Cuby to set up his fence destroyed 
by fire is given a warrant to impress men. 

20 April, 1676. John Barton admitted inhabitant. John 
Mungy and Samuel Pike admitted to sojourn during Indian wars. 

8 June, 1676. Selectmen agree with Benjamin Felton to set 
the prison in his garden, to stand so long as the town see meet 
or the prison shall last. Felton to have 40 shillings and the 
propriety of the ground. * 

9 June, 1676. Selectmen license George Dayland to sell beer 
and cider to travellers. 

.17 June, 1676. John Marston, Jr., is to remove the prison 
to Felton's land, refloor it, and to have 15 or 20 shillings. 

13-9, 1676. Mr. Edward Norice is granted £1^ for the use 
of his house about fifteen months for the watch, and the bill was 
given him for the sum to Constable Abraham Cole. 

5—10, 1676. Corporal John Putnam empowered to prosecute 
an action begun against Nicholas Manning for a debt to the 
town. 

7 April, 1677. Daniel Epps reengaged as grammar school 
master, not to be paid by a town rate, but some other suitable 
way. 

4 May, 1677. William Lord for ringing the bell and sweep- 
ing the meeting-house is to receive seven pounds and freedom 
from rates. 

1 1-4, 1677. Lt. Thomas Putnam and Nathaniel Putnam 
appointed by the selectmen two of a' committee to attend the 
next county court for the inspection of families, etc. 

16 June, 1677. The town-house to be moved into the street 
near about John Ropes' house. 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 163 

5—6, 1677. George Heaston, Jeremiah Meachell, on grand 
jury. 

8 Sept., 1677. Selectmen agree with Daniel Andrews to 
build the chimney and to fill and lath the walls of the town- 
house and underpin the same. Also with John Snelling to finish 
the town-house, to shingle, clapboard, floor, windows, stud and 
other things needed for ;^20. 

25—10, 1677. Robert Fuller admitted as an inhabitant. 

1677 — Rates of the following named persons abated : — Ben- 
jamin Ganson, Mr. Cannon, Roger Hill, Peter Miller, John 
Marston, Sr., Matthew Nixon, Joseph Ingerson, John Vowden, 
Gilbert Peters, Richard Simmons. 

Paid to Johr; Puttiuan for his fortification £ 7, 13, 00 

" Farmer Porter for their " 12, 08, 00 

" Lt. Leach in part for disburse- 
ments for fortification 4, 15, 00 

" Thomas Presson for work on 

fortification ' 14, 00, 00 

'' John Trask fortification work 

" Francis Nurse " " 

1678. Poor widows in Salem are widows Collins, Moses, 
Cranever, Rich, Pickworth, Smith, Starr, Pethrlcke, and "William 
HoUis, his wife"; they receive ;^4-2-0 out of the contributions 
for the poor in the deacon's hands. Other recipients of aid from 
the same fund were Thomas Oliver, Widows Moises, Hun, 
Richards, Harvey, Eastrick, Benjamin Felton. In 1678 assist- 
ance was also voted to William Hollies, Widow Sibley, John 
Mackeny, John Bly, Joseph Getchell's wife, Baxter's daughter 
Sheldon, Goody Gold. In 1679, Widow Mackmalley, Goody 
Parnell, Goody Batten, William Hollis, Rebecca Outon, Joseph 
Allen*s wife, Goody Oliver. 

Edward Flint and William Trask chosen selectmen but not 
having taken the oath of allegiance, others are chosen, among 
them Flint, who took the oath 19 Apr., 1678. 

19-2, 1678. John Higginson, Jr., chosen to keep the town 
books, succeeding John Corwin. 



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164 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

1678. The selectmen judge the call by Nathaniel and John 
Putnam and others for a meeting of commoners, illegal. 

The bridge by Benjamin Scarlett's is called " Rum Bridge." 
20-10, 1678. Richard Stevens admitted an inhabitant. 

George Booth is called joiner. 

6-1 1, 1678. Liberty granted Capt. Richard More to fence in 

the graves of his wife and son, Caleb. 

1679. Samuel Wakefield fined for entertaining Claudus 
Bonen, a Frenchman. 

14-6, 1679. David Hartshorne admitted to town during 
pleasure of selectmen. 

14-8, 1679. Mr. John Calley admitted an inhabitant. Good- 
man Beachum and Thomas, son of V^llliam Flint, dec'd, are 
appointed seats in the meeting-house. 

A family of Ingersons were living near the South river, and 
Ingersolls at the village. 

Sergeant Fuller is to mend the bridge at Beachy brook on the 
Andover road. 

25 Nov., 1679. Gilbert Tapley has permission renewed to 
draw beer and keep a " victualling house." 

31-10, 1679. John Tawley entertains Thos. Boyden without 
leave. 

5 Jan., 1679-80. Richard Tree and his wife Joanna, agree to 
take Rebecca Howton* and her child ; to keep the former for 
life and the latter till eio-hteen. 

1679. Lt. John Putnam chosen Deputy to attend the Gen- 
eral Court for the year, Mr. Bartholomew Gedney being chosen 
a magistrate. He was allowed payment for about eighty days' 
attendance on the General Court in 1680, including a week's 
attendance on the Court on the Wenham case "formerly." 

15 March, 1679-80. Town meeting. Capt. George Cor- 
win moderator. Chosen for selectmen : — 

Capt. John Corwin, 60 votes. 

" William Brown, 48 " 

*Sce above under Outon. 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 165 

Mr. Jon. Corwin, 39 votes. 

" John Higginson, 44 " 

" Richard Cromwell, 5^ " 

" Israel Porter, 39 " 

' " John Hathorn, 59 " 

Mr. John Higginson refused, and Mr. Bartholomew Gedney, 
being the next in vote, having 38, he is chosen by Hfting up 
of hands, to make the seven. ^ 

The selectmen are empowered to get the town records tran- 
scribed. 

1680. Thomas Green is poor and in want. He has had 
Sarah Lambert's child to keep for some years. Thomas James 
has a farm laid out for him. Jacob, son of Sgt. Thomas Fuller, 
is paid a bounty for killing wolves, 

Leonard Beckwith ordered to leave town and none to enter- 
tain him. John Buxton is constable. 

[John Weaden desires to be admitted an inhabitant. Proba- 
bly at this time, the date is illegible in notes.] 

14 June, 1680. Abraham Reade's hoMse at Royal Side 
impressed for use of a small pox patient brought into town by 
William Marston, who is ordered to take him to Read's. 

31 March, 168 1. John Lander, sealer of weights and meas- 
ures and clerk of the market. 

II April, 168 1. Thomas Maul by vote of the town is fined 
;^io for refusing to serve as constable. Joseph Home Is chosen 
constable. John Lander chosen clerk of the market. George 
Dean and Isaac Williams sealers of leather. Mr. Higginson 
paid his fine for refusing to serve as constable. 

Jonathan Walcutt is a constable. 

Ensign Nathaniel Felton, Lt. Thomas Putnam, Mr. Nathaniel 
Putnam, Ensign Thomas Fuller, chosen to mend the highways. 

31 May, 168 1. Highway to be laid out for the use of the 
inhabitants of Royal Side by Lt. Jo. Putnam, Mr. Israel Porter, 
and Joseph Herrick. 

7 Nov., 168 1. Mr. John Putnam to make a bridge over 
Crane river and impress what hands may be necessary. 



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i66 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

6—10, 1 68 1. The bridge at Frost fish brook cost ^5-16-06. 

24—11, 1681. Lt. Thomas Putnam is credited with work 
done at the "caseway" over the meadow called Hathorne's 
meadow. 

7 April, 1682. Nathaniel Sibley chosen clerk of the market. 
Nathaniel Beadle and John Ward sealers of leather. 

20 April, 1682. Lt. Anthony Needham and A4r. Thomas 
Flint overseers of the highway are to repair or rebuild the bridge 
by John Procter's. The Constable watch to consist of six men 
per night the most of which shall be sober men and house hold- 
ers. 

31 July, 1682. Mr. Stephen Sewall and wife allowed to sit 
in second pew where Mrs. Grove sits. 

21 Aug., 1682. By virtue of a warrant from the county 
treasurer to take a list of all male persons* with an estimate of 
estates, the selectmen make return, 310 heads or male persons 
and the estate of the town amounting to £^1 which makes the 

Nov., 1682. Samuel Gaskin and Joseph Boyce, overseers 
of the highway, present account for work done upon the highway 
by Mr. Gardner's hill and at the bridge by Benjamin Scarlett's. 

26 Feb., 1682-3. Samuel Beadle having been impressed and 
served in the Narraganset county against the Indians is granted 
an innholder's license. 



* ^n 1675, there were reported to be 500 houses in Salem. See -A''. £. Hist. 
Gen. Register^ October, 18S4, p. 381. 



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SALEM, MASS., TAX LISTS FOR 1683. 

The original papers from which these lists are compiled are on 
file at the county clerk's office at Salem. The selectmen of 
Salem brought a suit against Philip English for not discharging 
town rates committed to him as constable in 1683. Similar suits 
were instituted against Jno. Lambert, Richard Prithirch, and 
Christopher Phelps, also constables of Salem. Capt. John Price 
and Samuel Gardner, Sr., were chosen to prosecute the actions in 
behalf of the town. There are two or three copies of each list, 
none of which agree precisely. Every name shown on any of the 
lists is given below. Variation in spelling is usually indicated. 

At a town-meeting 12 March, 1682—3, the foUowiog select- 
men were elected : Capt. Jno. Corwin, Mr. Samuel Gardner, 
Sr., Capt. John Price, Mr. John Hathorne, Lt. John Pickering, 
Mr. Samuel Gardner, Jr., Mr. Israel Porter, John Higginson. 
The following were chosen constables : Mr. William Hirst, 
Christopher Phelps, Mr. Philip English, John Lambert, Sr., 
Nathaniel Howard, Joseph Pope. On the i7-6mo., 1683, the 
selectmen report to the county treasurer that a list of male per- 
sons shows 310 heads,* and the estate of the town is estimated 
at £/\.o^ in all ^65-16-8. The tvthingmenf chosen by the 
selectmen, 29-9mo., 1683, ^^'^^^ ^s follows : — 



Hirst's ward. 



Mr. Francis Neale, Sr., 
Mr. Joseph Grafton, 

Ely Kesor, 
Edw. Mould, 

John Tompkins, 1 Howard'^; ward 

WT^ T / nowara s wara, 

m. roster, Jr., J 

Mr. Willard, 1 ni. 1 > j 

T , o 11 y Phelps ward. 

John Cromwell, J ^ 

Beni. Fuller, 1 t 1 > j 

T u r>i. r > Lambert s ward. 
John Chapun, J 

Henry Keny, 1 n » j 

r^, ' n y rope s ward. 

1 hos. rreson, J ^ 



^ for Constable English's ward. 



*The lists show about 480 males assessed in 1683. 

■j-It is interesting to note the appointment of two tythingmen over each 
^'ard, regardless of the considerable difference in population as shown by the 
annexed lists. 

167 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 



171 



♦Philip English 

Lucas, Oliver 
Massey, John 
More, Francis 
Majery, Laranes 
Majery, Benj. 
Majory, Martin 
Majery, John 
Muddle, Philip 
Meade, Thos. 
Marsters, John 
Moses, Hen., Sr. 
Moses, Henry, Jr. 
Miller, Petter 
Maskoll, Thos. 
Maskell, John, Sr. 
Mare, John 
Marke, Mix'l. 
Mander, Jas. 
Mander, Walter 
Neale, Jer. 
Ormes, Jno., Sr. 
Ormes, Jno., Jr. 
Punchard, Wm. 
Phipeny, Jos., Sr. 
Petters^ Gilbert 
Pounding, Peter 
Pike, Sam'l 
Palfrey, (sailmakcr) 
Roots, Thos. 
Rose, (Roose) Thos. 
Roberts, Rich. 
Roberts,Timo.,("gone'*) 
Rumrey, Thos. 
Rumrey, (Timo.?) 



Wm. Hirst 

Wakefield, Sam'l 
Winter, Edw. 
Wilkes, Rob't estate 
Wocdwell, Mathew 
Willoughby, Nehemiah 
Whitaker, Isaac 
Walden, Nat'l 
Ward, John 



Christ. Phelps 

Verry, Jona. 
Williams, John, cooper 
Williams, Sam'l 
White, Zach. 
Wesgatt, Adam 
Wesgatt, John 
Wesgatt, Thos. 
Wilkinson, John 
Watkins, Tho. 
Woolcott, Hugh 
Messrs. Willard & 1 
Brewhouse J 



Philip English 

Skerry, Hen., Sr. 
Skerry, Hen.,, Jr. 
Skerry, Francis 
Swasy, Jos., Sr. 
Striker, Jos. 
Searle, Thos. 
Sion, (See Lion) 
Starr, Rich'd 
Salmon, Simon 
Turner, John's widow 
Tapley, John 
Tapley, Gilbert 
Tozier, Lenord 
Trow, Tobias, at ^ 

Nat. Beadles j 
Very, Ed. (crossed out) 
Williams, John, fisherm. 



Philip English 

Williams, Joseph 
Whitford, Walter 
Walters, Ezeitiell 
Woodberry, Richard 
Woodberry, Andrew 
Woodbury, Isack 
Wolland, Edw., Sr. 
Wolland, Edw., Jr. 
Woodman, Edw. 
Webb, Dan'l 
Webb, John 
Walter, Thos. 
Wadlen, Dan'l 
Weeden, John 
Wilke, Jas. 
Walker, Jno. 



*Thomas Bab, a;t. about 18, and Edward Wookcn, act. about 60, testified that Philip Muddle 
and William England had removed from Salem two years past, and that their names were on 
English's list. 



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172 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

A Few Notes on the Foregoing List. 
Baker, Cornelius, in 1673, bounded at one corner on a piece 
of commons of 100 a., next to him, going around the common, 
was Edward Bishop, Hosea Trask, " highway to Jeremy Wats 
house," Jacob Barney, Sr., Richard Leach, Goodman Howard. 

Ashby, Edmond and Benjamin, admitted inhabitants 25 Sept., 
1671 ; Edmond testified in 1684 regarding James Barnett, a sea- 
man, who had relatives in Boston and who was cast away about 
1680 at the Isle of Shoals. Benjamin Ashby's shipyard was on 
the road by Burying Point. 

Barton, John, adm. inh., 20 April, 1676. 
> Basey. Savage mentions but one family of this name, — that 

of John of Hartford. 

Bly, John, received town aid 1678 : John Bligh, Jr., and wife 
from Boston was warned in 1700. 

"Baxter's daughter Shelden " received town aid 1678. There 
was a Dr. John Baxter (Barton ?) in Salem, Ct. files, 1684^ 
1 Beadle, Samuel, having been impressed and served in the 

Narraganset country against the Indians, is granted an innholder's 

license, 25 Feb., 1682-3. ^'^ children named in settlement of 

estate, 1708, were eldest son Nathan, dec'd, leaving daughter 

Hannah, Lemmon, Robert, Hannah, Susanna (who married 

Henry Herrick), Mary, Hannah, Sarah, Richard. Also wife 

i Hannah. There was a George Beadle, of Salem, in 1655, 

' called cousin in will of widow Rebecca Brown. 

i Bartol, Robert, commanded a ketch in the Barbadoes trade in 

1685. 

Blethen, or Blefen, John, of Salem, aged 68 in 1692 and called 
"Sr." 

Bartle, Nicholas, perhaps Bartlett, who was from Kennebunk, 
Me., where he lived in 165 1. In 17 10-12, June, Capt. John 
Gardner was sent to visit old Nicholas Bartlett living at George 
Jacobs' (on the town), reported in a miserable, suff'ering condition, 
and to arrange a place for him. 

Barton, Matthew, received aid from his mother Tapley in 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 173 

Aug., 1 71 2. Widow Tapley, Sr., was mother of Christopher 
Batten, who had his rates abated for caring for her, she being 
bedridden, 8 Jan., 171 1- 12. He was driven into Salem by the 
Indians. Shoreman. His wife was Sarah. 

Barton, Dr. This was John, of an armorial family. He 
shipped as surgeon in the ship Hannah and Elizabeth, 1679, and 
was obliged to sue the master and owner, Nicholas Manning, for 
his wages. 

Cox, James, sues 1684, Nathaniel Veren, master of the ketch 
Neptune from Salem to Virginia in 1682 for wages due as sea- 
man. John Wilkinson, aged 37 in 1684, shipped with Cox. 

Combs, Michael, adm. inh., 24-4, 1668*, Humphrey exempted 
from prohibition imposed preceding year to patronize tavern, etc., 
1673. ^^ ^^^^ ^" latter part of 17 12. 

Cutler, Sam'l, at the Farms. 

Clifford, Richard, and Thorne, Israel, had small houses on the 
rocks beyond the bridge in Nov., 1683. John Ely was paid for 
digging Richard Clifford's grave 5 April, 1686, and same day 
Thorne and his wife are admitted to stay in town by giving 
security, and Sarah Thorne takes the widow Goodale to keep. 
John Clifford, of Salem, 1692, was aged 63 ; he was called ser- 
geant in 1683. 

Collier, John, being in prison and distracted, town puts him in 
I care of Lt. Samuel Gardner. There is due Mr. John Gingell 

;^6-i5-o (27 weeks at 5s.). He was one of those who was con- 
cerned in the Curwen and other robberies from warehouses in 
Salem in 1684. Wm. Goodsoe and wife Elizabeth, Joseph 
Getchell, and John Guppy, were accomplices. Godsoe and wife 
broke jail at Ipswich in July. Joseph Getchell was son of John 
and Wilborough Getchell, of Marblehead, and brother of Thomas, 
of Portsmouth, R. I., and of Samuel, of Marblehead. John Col- 
lier was a baker and aged 28 in 1684. 

Cole, John. In 1684 ^^^ son John was admonished for pro- 
fane speaking on the Sabbath. 






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174 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

Fuller, Thomas, Sr., adm. inh., Salem, 18-6, 1674, " with his 
whole farme,'* He signs, giving consent. 

Fuller, Robert, adm. inh., 25-10, 1677. 

Flint, Edw., and Trask, Wm., being chosen selectmen, not 
having taken oath of allegiance, others are chosen, among them- 
Flint who took oath, 19 April, 1678. 

Elliot, Roger, adm. inh., 28-11, 1683. 

Dounton, John, in cleaning a gun, which snapped, he killed 
Rebecca Booth. 1684, he was held in ;{^iooo bonds. 

Dennis, James, probably of Marblehead, aged 42 in 1684. 

Widow Peter Henderson's rates abated, 1700. That year 
Peter Henderson, Sr., and Jr., were assessed. In Dec, 1701, 
"Old Widow Henderson." In 17 12 Peter Henderson, Sr., 
received an abatement for his son's head ; and Benjamin Hen- 
derson's head was abated. See note under Skinner. 

Grafton, John, and Ward, Joshua, having lately suffered ship- 
wreck all this last year's rates are remitted. 

Howard, John, perhaps John Harwood, who lived on the 
Francis Nurse farm in 1673. 

Greenow, Mr., i. e., Robert. 

Ganson, Benj., rates abated, 1677. 

Grove, Mr., i.e., Edward. Stephen Sewall and wife allowed to 
sit in second pew opposite where Mr. Grove sits, 31 July, 1682. 

Hardy, Thomas, Jr., to carry Thomas Clarke to Barbadoes, 
1684. A Thomas Clarke's child was buried by John Bly, who 
got pay for it in Dec, 1683. 

Green, John, received partial abatements of his rate 1685-6, 
in consideration of his keeping his mother-in-law; also in 1686. 

Lyndell, Tymothy, adm. inh., Salem, 8-1 1, 1660. 

Lander, John, had a house lot granted 5 April, 1672. Chosen 
sealer of weights and measures and clerk of the market, 31 
March, 1682. 

Lander, John, and son were among those who worked on the 
"gut," 1686. In 1699 Mrs. Lander petitioned for a change 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 175 

of land at head of Forest River. In 17 15, the widow Lander 
and her daughter Johnson were relieved by the town. 
. Lander, John, of Kittery, whom Savage says had died before 
1646, was living in 1649 (X^'''^ Deeds). 

Ino;erson, Nathaniel, is allowed to sell beer and cider by the 
quart for the time while the farmers are a building of their meet- 
ing-house and on Lord's day afterward, 18-12, 1672. ^ 

Loombs, John. A John Coombs died in 1691. In 1693 
there was a widow Loomes, who was-/ sister of William Trask. 
She was probably not a widow in 1686. 

Miller, Peter, rates abated, 1677. 

More. Liberty granted Capt. Richard More to fence in his 
wife and son's graves, 6-1 1, 1678. Richard More, mariner, had 
wife Sarah in 1690. 

Mackmallows. The following were in town in 1696-7, bear- 
ing this name — John, Joshua, Alexander, James. Alexander 
Mackmally was fined a shilling for abusing an Indian, 1684. 

Masury. First and last the Masurys gave the authorities a 
good deal of trouble. In 17 10 it was ordered that Robert Ste- 
vens and wife and other wretched people that are said to be shel- 
tered at ye widow Mesharys to depart this town. She may have 
been the widow of Martin whose coffin was paid for by the town 
18 Feb., 1709-10, or of Lawrence whose "two poor children," 
James and Jane were put out 31 Jan., 1710-11 as apprentices, 
I their father being deceased, to Capt. Jona Putnam and wife. 

Among the crew of the ship Daniel and Elizabeth, 168 1-2, 
commanded by Daniel Janverin of the Isle of Jersey, which was 
built in Salisbury, was Thomas Meajurey. Another seaman was 
Philip Dumurray. John Dunton also appears on the ship's roll. 

Masury, Lawrence, mariner, arrested for selling liquor to the 
Indians 16 Sept., 1684; acknowledges having sold cider but not 
rum this three months. He knows not of the charge unless his 
kinsman sold it. 

Mayber, Maybie, Richard, aged 40 in 1684-6. Had land 
I adjoining Stephen Sewall. 



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176 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

Ormes, Richard, a brazier, being warned out in Feb., 1699- 
1700. He refused to go and a warrant was taken out by the 
selectmen. 
•! Orne, John, Sr., of Salem, in 1679 deeded land to his son' 

Benjamin, and used a seal which although heraldic is hardly 
decipherable, perhaps, the charges are fleur-de-lis, and perhaps 
there js a label in chief. It is hard to determine. The witnesses 
were John How and John Andrew, and the deed was acknowl- 
edged before John Hathorne. 
j Phippeny, Joseph, adm. inh., io-9mo., 1665. 

T 

I Powland, James, chosen, 21—7, 1675, town gunner for order- 

j ^ ing and managing of ye great artillery, and to see guns are made 

I fit for ser\Mce, succeeds Nathaniel Pickman, discharged. Now 

j Pousland. 

i Peytheitch, Richard, adm. inh., 14-12, 1675. Widow Peth- 

I ricke one of the eight poor widows, 1677. 

Pike, Samuel, and John A4ungy (Munjoy ?) adm. to sojourn 
during Indian wars, 20 April, 1676. 

Peters, Gilbert, rates abated, 1677. He was from Marldon 
in Devonshire. 

Pynson, Wm., constable, 1691. 

Pinsent, Thomas, a poor man, 1697. Widow Pinsent's rates 
abated, 1697. 

Robinson, John, a tailor, in Salem, 1672. 

Rogers, Jeremiah, bought the old Prison in spring of 1684, 
and reembursed Benj. Felton upon whose land it stood. The 
prison had been moved to goodman Benj. Felton's garden in 
1676, with the reversion of the land to his- heirs after the prison 
i j should be gone. Benj. Felton received financial aid from the 

jj ' - Deacon's fund in 1677. 

h| Scinner, Walter, appointed to keep the cows, 1676; Walter and 

I • wife, Hannah, presented for card playing, 1685. Witnesses were 

\ John Bly and wife (who had son John), James Wakefield, Peter 

■{! . Henderson, Jr., and Mary Henderson. Among the players were 

John and Peter Henderson. The players were fined 5 shillings 



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SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 177 

€ach. The playing was at Skinners' but he was let off, paying 
costs, it being his first ofFence. 

Shaflin, or Shaplin, Michael, lived near Wm. Shaw, separated 
by land of William King, who died in 1684. 

Tawley. Mr. John Tawley lately arrived from New Found- 
land in his ketch, brought the small pox. He also brought pas- 
sengers who scattered abroad. Francis Elliot ordered to be sent 
onboard; others were taken from Sgt. John Clifford's, 19-8, 

1683. 

Tree, Richard, had wife Joanna Tree. Tree had a son who 
lived with Edmunds in Lynn in 1684. James Tree was aged 
41 in 1684. 

Vowden, John, rates abated, 1677. Elizabeth Vooden lived 
near the Trees and Vealeys in 1684. 

Westgate, Adam. His grave was paid for 20 Dec, 1704. 
He had been sick and on the town many years. He was an old 
man at his death, and was a mariner. 

Walker, John, aged 23, and Thomas Mascoll, aged 27, be- 
longing to ketch Friendship, Capt. Richard Ingersoll, master from 
Saltatudos for Salem, which ran ashore at Cape Cod, i April, 
1683, testified that they found Nathaniel Ingersoll one of the 
ship's company dead on the shore and buried him. Nathanit' 
Ingersoll left a widow, Mary, who was sued by Capt. John and 
Elizabeth Price, administrators of the will of Walter Price, for 
not returning an inventory of estate she held life interest in 
which was left her by Capt. Walter Price and to revert to her 
son, Nathaniel Price. 

Wooland, Edw., Sr., sues Richard Thistle, of Mackerel Cove, 
for wages as shoreman in a voyage made with said Thistle in 
1683. Wm. Bartoll and Richard Freiztle are sureties for 
Thistle. 

The following abatements were allowed, 12-12, 1684, upon 
Constable Lambert's list, presumably for the year preceding. 

John Glover, Samuel Ropes, Morgan Joans, William Tilley, 
Jo. Gatchel, Joseph Read, Richard Croad, Jr., William Flint, 



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178 SALEM TOWN RECORDS. 

Thomas Stone, John Guppy, Richard Mebor, John Parker.^ 

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Peter Joy. 

And at the same time Homes received credit for abatements 
from John Bly, Israel Stearns, R. Rowland, Beach Sc Dennis, 
Briant Dorothy (Dority), Wm. Godsoe, Charles Driver, Wm. 
Poor, N. Pitman, Jr. - 

Haynes received credit for abatements for Jonathan Knights, 
Thomas Haynes, Elisha Ozburne, Thomas Clark, John 
Browne, Shubel Sterns, Clem. Rumrel, John Gloid, Wm. 
Silsby, Widow Pope, John Keany, Lot Kellom, Samuel 
Pentman, Fra. Peford, Steven Watts, Richard Tree, Joseph 
Meslery, Isaac Meacham, Jos. Foster, Jos. Southwick, Richard 
More, Jr. 

Phelps received credit for abatements for Math. Price, John 
Veary, Nathaniel Vearen, Nathaniel Pease, Edw. Veary, Peter 
Henderson, John Smith, H. Higginson, John Edwards, James 
Cox, Cr. Phelps, John Best. 

Jonathan Auger received credit for abatements for John Best, 
Nathaniel Pease, Wm. Smith, John Smith, James Cox, (Mathew ?) 
Price, Isaac Taylor, Joseph Getchel, Wm. Marston, Nathaniel 
Vearen. 



HOADLEY. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

I notice in the Quarterly for April, 1901, the births of three 
children to Ithiel Hadlcy (page 48). The name should be 
Hoadly or Hoadley. Ithiel was son of William (3d), of Branford 
and Waterbury, (and Sarah Frisbie). His sister Sarah was wife 
of Israel Calkins, whose fourth child, Roswell, was born in 
Walpole, N. H. Israel Calkins* parents I have not been able to 
find. K. A. Prichard. 






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GENEALOGICAL RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF 
HARPSWELL, CUHBERLAND COUNTY, MAINE. 



[Compiled from the original town records, with notes and additions, by 

Eben Putnam.] 

[Abbreviations : m., married ; pub., publishment of marriage intention ; 
d., died j b., born j dau., daughter ; H , Harpswell j Ch., children.] 

Additon. 

John, m. (pub. 15 July, 1775,) Mercy, dau. Caleb Curtis. 

Ch. b. Harpswell : — John, b. 5 July, 1776 ; Caleb Curtis, b. 
I Feb., 1779; Abigail, b. 26 Feb., 1781 ; Samuel, b. 17 Jan., 
1785; Mercy, b. 26 Dec, 1785; Ebenezer, b. 17 June, 1788; 
Nathaniel Badger, b. 12 Aug., 1790. 

Adams. 
Mary, of Harpswell, pub, to Clement Skofield, of Brunswick, 
6 Apr., 1767. 

John, of H., to Grace Tarr, of H., pub. 24 Sept., 1772. 
Katharine, of H., pub. to John Adams, of Bowdoin, 2 Jan., 

1773- 

Thomas, of H., to Sarah Tarr, of H., pub. 14 July, 1775. 

Adam, of H., pub. to Mary McClarry, of Georgetown, 14 

Feb., 1777. 

Alexander. 

David, m. (pub. 26 Nov., 1761) Anna, dau. Joseph Ewing. 

Ch. b. Harpswell: — William, b. 1 1 Nov., 1762; Joseph, b. 

179 



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RECORDS OF THE TOWN OP^ HARPSWELL. 



1 6 Mar., 1765; d. early ; David, b. 31 Mar., 1767; d. 22 
Nov., 1818; Anna, b. 2 Sept., 1769; Isaac, b. 10 Oct., 1774; 
<d. Mar., 185 1 ; Isabella, b. 10 Oct., 1774; d. 1 1 Nov., 1829. 

William, of H., pub. to Mary Hascol, of H., 12 Mar., 
1762. 

James, m. Martha, dau. of William Musterd. 

Ch. b. Harpswell : — John, b. 15 May, 1758; Jennet, b. 14 
Jan., 1760 ; d. 28 Mar., 1766 ; James, b. 4 Jan., 1762 ; Eliza- 
beth, b. 14 Feb., 1764; Abigail, b. 7 May, 1765; William, b. 
21 Apr., 1767; Catherine, b. 13 Jan., 1769; Elisha, b. 16 
Sept., 1770 ; Joseph, b. 20 Aug., 1773. 

John, m. (pub. 22 Jan., 1768,) Elizabeth, dau. of Josiah 
Clark. 

Ch. b. Harpswell : — John, b. 2 Feb., 1769 ; d. 11 May, 1854 ; 
David, b. 9 Feb., 1771 ; Martha, b. 18 Dec, 1772; Ezekiel, 
b. 21 Jan., 1775; d. 23 Sept., 1837 ; Henry, b. 13 Apr., 1777 i 
d. 4 Dec, 1854; Josiah, b. 1779. 

Hugh, m. (pub. 18 Jan., 1773,) Catherine, dau. Deacon 
Joseph Ewing ; m. 2d, Hannah, dau. Andrew Dunning. 

Ch.: — Margaret, b. 16 Apr., 1772; d. 19 Feb., 1829; Bet- 
sey, b. I Mar., 1774; Martha, b. 14 Oct., 1779; Hugh, b. 14 
Dec, 1781 ; Joseph, b. 12 Apr., 1784; Benjamin, b. 12 Apr., 
1790. 

Samuel, m. (pub. to Rosa Clark, of H., 11 Jan., 1771,) 
Rosanna, dau. Josiah Clark ; she d. 2 Aug., 1831. 

Ch.: — Samuel, b. 7 May, 1771 ; Mary, b. 18 Nov., 1772; 
Abigail, b. 27 Jan., 1776; d. i Oct., 1857 ; Elizabeth, b. 17 
Nov., 1778; Hannah, b. 20 Dec, 1780 ; John, b. 8 Oct., 
1782 ; Jane, b. 15 Apr., 1784. 

John, Jr., m. Lydia, dau. John Rodick, of Harpswell. 

Ch : — Betsey, b. 4 June, 1794 ; d. 25 Dec, 1796; Hannah, 
b. 21 Oct., 1795; Betsey, b. 22 Nov., 1797. 

He m. 2d, Elizabeth, dau. of William Wilson. She d. 11 
July, 1844. 

C h : — Lydia, b. 4 March, 1802; Josiah, b. 4 May, 1806; 



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RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF HARPSWELL. 



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Martha, b. 2 July, 1808; Huldah, b. 23 April, 1810; Fanny, 
b. 25 Aug., 1812. 

EzEKiEL, m. Margaret, d. of Paul Curtis, of Harpswell. She 
d. 21 Oct., 1857. 

Ch : — Ezekiel, b. 31 Oct., 1797; d. 6 Aug., 1852; Lydia, 
b. 25 April, 1799; Assenith, b. 23 Oct., 1801 ; d. 6 Dec, 
1877; David, b. I Oct., 1803; d. 30 April, 1852; Henry, b. 
23 Aug., 1807; d. 28 Oct., 1831; Paul Curtis, b. 4 May, 
1 8 10; d. 6 May, 1890; Sally Curtis, b. 12 June, 18 12; Jane 
Blake, b. 5 May, 1814; d, 2 Dec, 1873; Susanna Stover, b. 
21 May, 1816; d. 16 June, 1886; James Clark, b. 21 Sept., 
1 81 9; d. 2 Nov., 1890. ^'' 

David, m. Sarah, dau. Deacon Andrew Dunning. She d. 14 
Sept., 1836. 

Ch : — David, b. 31 Dec, 1792; d. 9 April, 1795; Margaret, 
b. 3 March, 1795; Nancy, b. 2 Feb., 1797; David, b. 30 Jan., 
1799; d. 16 Jan., 1819; Rebecca, b. 28 Jan., 1801 ; Hannah, 
b. 4 March, 1803; Nehemiah C, b. 15 March, 1806; Deborah 
R., b. 25 May, 1808 ; Betsey C, b. 19 May, 1810; d. i 7 Aug., 
1828. > ■ 

Isaac, d. 18 March, 1851 ; m. Mary, dau. of Thomas Pen- 
nell, of Brunswick. 

Ch : — Isaac, b. 21 Sept., 1796; d. 24 March, 18 19; David, 
b. 19 Nov., 1798; d. 12 Dec, 1804; Eleec, b. i^ May, 1801; 
Thomas, b. 9 June, 1803; David, b. 15 Nov., 1805; d. 22 
June, 1887; Mary, b. 21 March, 1808; James and William, 
b, 20 March, 1814; Charles, b. 28 Aug., 18 19; d. 27 Jan., 
1852; Pennell, b. 19 Jan., 181 1. 

Samuel, Jr., d. 14 April, 1835; m. Sarah, dau. of William 
Willson, of (Jarpswell. 

Ch : — Samuel, 3d, b. 2 June, 1794; Josiah, b. 7 May, 1795; 
Betsey, b. 7 May, 1796 ; d. 4 Dec, 1826; Martha, b. 5 Dec, 
1797; d. 27 April, 1805; Anna, b. 25 Aug., 1800; Rosanna, 
b. 5 Oct., 1802; Susanna, b. 5 Oct., 1804; Samuel, b. 28 Oct., 
1806; d. 22 Nov., 1827; Simeon, b. i Dec, 1808 ; Mary, b. 






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i82 ' RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF HARPS WELL. 

i6 March, i8i2; William, b. 5 May, 1819; Abigail, b. 22 
Aug., 1821. 

Hugh, m. Anna, dau. of David Willson, of Bowdoin. 

Ch : — Andrew Dunning, b. 9 Nov., 1809; Noah, b. 10 Jan., 
1812; Hugh, b. 8 Sept., 1814. 

Joseph, m. Amelia, 

Ch : — Daniel R., b. 3 Sept., 1808 ; Joseph, b. 14 Jan., 1810 ; 
Ambrose, b. 5 Jan., 181 2; Thomas, b. 24 Aug., 181 3. 

John, 3D, m. Lorana, dau. of Thomas Farr, of Harpswel', 
who d. 25 Sept., 1845. 

Ch : — Eliza, b. 3 July, 1801; Lydia, b. 24 May, 1803; John 
b. 3 July, 1805 ; Perry, b. 5 Sept., 1807 ; Mary, b. 24 March, 
1809 ; Thomas, b. 29 Nov., 1 8 14 ; d. 3 April, 1838 ; Eleanor, b. 
16 Jan., 1818; Arthur B., b. 16 June, 1820 ; Caroline, b. 5 
April, 1823. 

Thomas, m. Hannah, dau. of Andrew Dunning, of Harpswell. 

Ch : — Elizabeth, b. 18 Nov., 1828; d. 6 March, 1835; Mary 
Pennell, b. 21 March, 1831 ; Thomas, b. 16 July, 1833; d. 28 
May, 1885; Charles, 2d, b. 3 Nov., 1835; Elizabeth, b. 3 
July, 1838; Andrew, b. 12 Jan., 1841 ; Hannah, b. 23 June, 
1845. 

John, 4TH, b. i i Oct., 1795 ; d. 2 Feb., 187 1 ; m. Bethiab, 
who was b. 18 July, 1797. 

Ch : — Sarah, b. 31 Aug., 1815; James, b. 27 Nov., 1817; 
Buell, b. 17 Aug., 1819 -, d. Jan., 1852 ; Lois, b. 26 Sept., 182 1 ; 
Joan, b. 30 Nov., 1827; Peggy, b. 1830 ; Charles, b. 1834; 
Eunice, b. 1836; Phildelia, b. 1837. 

Allen. 

Ephraim, m. Abigail (pub. to Abigail Toothacre, of H., 11 
June, 1763). 

Ch : — Mehitable, Feb., 1765; Elizabeth, b. April, 1767; 
Elisha, b. Dec, 1769; d. 6 April, 1859; Ephraim, b. Dec, 
1775; Mercy, b. Sept., 1780 ; Rebecca, b. Dec, 1786; Abi- 
gail, d. 2 July, 1826; John, b. April, 1782. 

{To be continugJ.^ 



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AMERICAN PRISONERS AT QUEBEC DURING THE 

REVOLUTION. 

From the Haldimand Papers, British Museum Add. Mss. 

{Continued from page I J 2.) 



Return of Rebel Prisoners, 15 Nov., 1778, Continued. 

Abr. Cronk, aged 20, residence Albany County, N. Y., 16 
Aug., 1777, taken at St. Croix. 

Jas. Chadwick, aged 22, residejice Pepperell, Mass., 24 Sept., 
taken at Diamond Is. 

Philip Smith, aged 17, residence Bolton, Conn., 18 Sept., 
taken at Ticonderoga. 

Jedediah Blackman, aged 36, residence Stratford, Conn., 12 
Nov. ; Orsemus Holmes, aged 20, Pembroke, Mass. ; Wm- 
Wallace, aged 32, Worcester, Mass. ; Jas. Gibson, aged 56, 
born in Ireland, 7 July, at the Hospital, all taken on Lake 
Champlain. 

John Flinn, aged 47, born In Ireland, 7 July, taken on Lake 
Champlain. 

Newport, a negro, residence Newbury, Mass., 6 July, taken 
on LakexChamplaln. 

Lemuel Roberts, aged 33, residence Charlotta, Bennington, 
29 Jan., 1778, taken at Missi. Bay. 

Jacob Pugh, aged 20, residence Winchester, Va., 20 Sept., 

1777, taken 120 miles below Ft. Pitt. 

Amos York, aged 48, residence Susquehanna, Conn., 10 Feb., 

1778, taken by the savages. 

183 



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184 AMERICAN PRISONERS AT QUEBEC. 

John Bridges, aged 30, residence Bedford, Pa., 8 Nov., I'j']']^ 
taken at Stony Creek. 

Christopher King, aged 28, residence Bedford, Pa., 20 Nov., 

1777, taken near Bedford by the savages. * » 

John Dodge, aged 24, residence , Conn., has been settled 

at Detroit 7 years ; sent by Lieut. -Gov. Hamilton. 

Lemuel Fitch, aged 36, residence Susquehanna, Conn., 8 Feb., 

1778, taken by the savages. 

Samuel Craig, aged 50, residence Derry, Pa., 5 Nov., 1777, 
taken near the Ohio. 

Thos. Shoars, aged 27, residence Baltimore, Md., 7 Mar., 
taken 700 miles below Ft. Pitt. 

John O'Farrall, at Point au Lac, taken up on suspicion. 

Joel Pringle, aged 30, residence Skenesboro, N. H. Came 
on board the Carleton schooner, at Crown Point, 29 May, 1778. 

Eph. Bogue, aged 40, residence Castletown, N. H. Came 
on board the Carleton schooner, at Crown Point, 29 May, 1778. 

Eph. Willoughby, aged 30, taken on suspicion of having been 
in arms with the Rebels. 






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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MAN5UR FAMILY. 

By John H. Mansur, of Royersford, Pa. 

(Continued from page J 27.) 



TRIBE OF JOHN, 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

VII. 1-2-1-2-10-4. Charles E. Mansur, son of Reuben 
M., born 1841, married 26 June 1865, Annie Jane McGinley, 
born 1843. They live at Houlton, Me., on the homestead. 

Children born in Houlton : — 

I-2-I-2-10-4-1. Ernest Milton, born 24 Feb., 1S67. 
I-2-1-2-10-4-2. Raymond Pearl, born Dec, 1871. 
I-2-1-2-10-4-3. Laura Serena, born i July, 1874. 
I-2-I-2-10-4-4. Stella Hope, born 4 July, 1883. 



VII. I-2-2-I-I-2. Harriet Mansur, daughter of William 
Mansur, born 22 July, 181 7, at Delaware, Ohio. She lived at 
home till her marriage, 4 Sept., 1844, at Cincinnati, O., to 
John P. Epply, of Cincinnati, O., born 9 Jan., 1818, in York 
Co., Pa., died 22 Sept., 1897, at Cincinnati. 

Mr. Epply was in business in Cincinnati for many years as an 
undertaker. 

Children born in Cincinnati: — 

I-2-2-1-1-2-1. John Horton Eppley, born 9 June, 1845; died 19 Dec, 1878. 

I-2-2-I-I-2-2. William Wesley " " 7 Aug., 1847; " 17 Feb., 1848. 

I-2-2-1-I-2-3. Charles Mansur " ** 30 Nov., 1848. 

I-2-2-I-I-2-4. William Horace *' '* lojan., 1851. 

1-2-2-I-I-2-5. Ella Gertrude " " II Jan., 1853. 

I-2-2-I-I-2-6. Mary Belle " •* 27 July, 1855. 

.185 



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i86 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

VII. I-2-2-I-2-I. Mariah Adams, daughter of Lavina 
Mansur, born iS Oct., 1S12 ; died at Bradford, Vt., Aug. 1876. 
Married, 26 May, 1836, Joseph Carter Winship, of Henniker. 

Child: — 

I-2-2-I-2-I-I. Mary Elizabeth Winship, born 29 Feb., 1843; married 27 
Jan., 1859, Henry K. Carton, who died . She 

lives at Bradford, Vt. 



VII. I -2-2- 1 -2-4. Abel Edward Adams, son of Lavina 

Mansur, born in Mason, N. H., 25 June, 1S24; died 5 Nov., 

1892, at Greenville, N. H. ; married i I^Iay, 1 851, Eliza A. 

Mason, of Auburn, Me. 

Children, born in Mason : — 

I-2-2-1-4-1-1. Nellie E., born 4 April, 1852; unmarried. 
1-22-1-4-1-2. Emma J., born ID Aug., 1855; unmarried. 
1-2-2-1-4-1-3. Lizzie L., born 25 Feb., 1859; died 26 Oct., 1863. 
I-2-2-I-4-1-4. Ida F., born 27 Aug., 1862; died 12 Sept., 1876. 

V 

VII. 1-2-2- 1-2-5. Aaron A. Adams, son of Lavina INIansur, 
born at Mason, N. H., 25 June, 1824; married 22 May, 1855, 
Mary A. Lucas, of Groton, Mass. Mr. Adams has been post- 
master at Behnont, Mass., for twenty-six years. He is a grocer. 

Children, born at Belmont: — 

• I-2-2-1-2-5-1. James B., born 22 March, 1856; died 26 Dec, 1881. 

1-2-2-1-2-5-2. Julia L., born I Jan., 1858; married 25 Oct., 1894, Hazen M. 

Weeks. Ch. Eleanor, born 2 Feb., 1896, at Belmont. 

1-2-2-1-2-6-3. William L., born 22 March, 1S62. 

1-2-2-I-2-5-4. Helen M., born i May, 1866. 



VII. 1-2-2-1-2-7. Sarah Amanda Adams, daughter of 
Lavina Mansur, born in Mason, N. H., 10 July, 1S34; mar- 
ried 20 Nov., 1855, Henry K. French, of Peterboro, N. H. ; 
born 21 Jan., 1826. Live at Peterboro. • ' 

Children: — 

I-2-2-1-2-7-I. Charles H. French, born 22 Dec, 1856; died 2 P>b., 1895, at 
Brooklyn, N. V.; married 30 April, 1879, Edna L. Brad- 
ley, born 27 July, 1857. 

I-2-2-I-2 7-2. Hattie A. French, born 27 Aug., 1858 ; died 24 Oct., 18S7 ; 
married 30 April, 1884, Dr. J. O. Tilton, of Lexington, Mass* 

I-2-2-I-2-7-3. George A. French, born 22 Sept., i860 ; married 20 June, 

1894, Isabelle C. Derring. Lives at Duluth, Minn. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 187 

VII. I -2- 2- 1 -3- 1 . Mary Ann Mansur, daughter of Jeremy 
Mansur, born 22 Feb., 1815 ; married 10 Sept., 1831, John H. 
Wright of Philadelphia. 

Children: — 

I-2-2-1-3-1-1. Franklin M. Wright, born i May, 1833; died 4 Feb., 1896. 

1-2-2-1-3-1-2. Mansur H. Wright, born 7 March, 1835; died 27 Dec, 1885. 

1-2-2-1-3-1-3. D. Mary Jane Wright, born 29 Nov., 1837; died 20 May, 1839. 

John H. Wright, the first husband was born 7 Feb., 1807. 
He was the son of John and Hester Wright of Philadelphia. 
He was a dry goods merchant, and for a time carried on the 
business in partnership with his brother-in-law, William Man- m^,^ 

sur. He died 11 July, 1S46. 

Mrs. Wright, married, second, 27 July, 1847, ■^^- Charles 
Parry of Philadelphia. No children. 

Dr. Chas. Parry was born 14 Feb., 18 14. He was a physi- 
cian. He died 11 Aug., 1S61. 



VII. 1-2-2-1-3-2. Clarissa Mansur, daughter of Jeremy 
Mansur, born at Richmond, Ind., 17 Jan., 1S17; died 5 April, 
1898, at St. Louis; married 5 Sept., 1S37, James C. Ferguson, 
of Indianapolis, Ind., born 8 Oct., 1810, in Bourbon Co., Ky., 
died 24 July, 1S91 at San Jose, Cal. 

Children : — 

I-2-2-1-3-2-1. Mansur C. Ferguson, born 13 Aug., 1838; died 21 Dec, 1839. 

1-2-2-1-3-2-2. Mary Frances " '• 2 March, 1840; married 28 Jan., 

1868, Nathan M. Neeld of St. Louis, Mo. 

1-2-2- 1 -3-2-3. Isabella ^L Ferguson, born 12 Aug., 1842; died 24 June, i860. 
The day she was to graduate from Georgetown, Ky., Sem- 
inary. 

I-2-2-I-3-2-4. Clara Ferguson, born 28 Oct. 1844; married 28 June, 1868, 
Edward B. Howard of Alstead, N. H., who was born 31 
Oct., 1842, son of WiUiam and Clarissa (Kingsbury) How- 
ard. 

1-2-2-1-3-2-5. John Mansur Ferguson, born 8 Feb., 1852; died 24 Oct., 1874. 
Unmarried. 

1-2-2-1-3-2-6. John Quincy Ferguson, born 30 Dec, 1854. 

1-2-2-1-3-2-7. Edward W., " " 17 Nov., 1856. 

Mr. Ferguson settled in Indianapolis, Ind., about 1841, and 
engaged in pork packing; continued therein nearly forty years. 
At the same time he was identified with a number of its business 



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i88 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

and social interests, and was one of the prominent men of the 
community. In the spring of iSSi, he removed with his family 
to Chicago and engaged again in the pork packing business 
with his two sons-in-law, E. B. Howard and N. M. Neeld. 
After remaining in Chicago nearly ten years his health failed 
him, and he sought refuge in California. 



VII. 1-2-2-1-3-3. William Mansur, son of Jeremy Man- 
sur, was born 20 Jan., 1819, in Salsbury, Ind., at that time the 
county seat of Wayne Co., Indiana. 

When he was four years old, his father, Jeremy Mansur, 
moved to a farm half way between Richmond and Centreville, . 
Ind. Ten years later the family removed to Richmond, Ind., 
where William remained till he was of age. In 1S40, he 
settled in Indianapolis, and went into the dry goods business 
with his brother-in-law, John H. Wright. This business he 
gave up, however, and in partnership wih this father, built in 
1S47 a pork house, near the old Madison depot, in Indian- 
apolis. He was engaged in the pork packing business until 
1S62, during the latter part of which brae he was associated . 
with his brother, Isaiah Alansur. In 1863, Jeremy Mansur, 
Isaiah Mansur, and William Mansur, with others, started the 
Citizens' National Bank, of Indianapolis, of which William 
Mansur acted as ''irector for twentv vears. He was at the same 
time director of tlie Indianapolis Rolling Tvlills. For thirty-one 
years he was also trustee of the Second Presbyterian Church. 
At the most active period of his life, he served as City Commis- 
sioner and as a member of City Councils. 

He died in Indianapolis, on 18 Oct., 1893, in the 76th year of 
his age. 

He married 17 Aug., 1857, Hannah Ann Culley, who was 
born at Lawrenceburg, Ind., 23 Oct., 1826. She is the oldest 
daughter of Hon. David Valander and Mary Culley. 

She resided at home until her marriage, when she removed to 
Indianapolis, Ind., where she has since resided. 

Children : — 

I -2-2-1 -3-3- 1. Charles W. Mansur, born 18 Aug., 1848. 

1-2-2-1-3-3-2. James F. " " 13 Oct., 1850; died 30 May, 1858. 

1-2-2-1-3-3-3. David C. " " 25 Mar., 1853; " 14 Nov., 1861. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 189 

VII. 1-2-2-1-3-5. Isaiah Mansur, son of Jeremy Man- 
sur, born in Richmond, Ind. ; died 3 Dec, 1880, at Indian- 
apolis; married 25 June, 1S62, Amelia Brown, of Philadelphia, 
born 7 April, 1841, at Philadelphia. 

Mr. Mansur conducted a banking business in Indianapolis for 

^ many years. 

Children: — 

1-2-2-1-3-5-1. Joseph Brown, born 4 May, 1861 ; died 2 Aug., 1894. 
1-2-2-1-3-5-2. Cecilia " 17 July, 1864. 



VII. 1-2-2-1-3-4. Sarah Jane Mansur, daughter of Jer- 
emy Mansur, of Richmond, Ind., born, Salisbury, Ind., 5 June, 
182 1 ; married 7 May, 1839, William Scott Reid, of Richmond, 
Ind., whom she survives. 



* 


Children: — 












1-2-2-1-3-4-1. 


A daughter, born 


31 


March, 1841 ; died same day. 




1 


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James Franklin F 


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, born 29 Oct., 1842; died 25 June, 


1851. 


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Letitia Jane 


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« 31 July, 1845; " I Feb., 


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Daniel Mansur 


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" 12 Oct., 1848; " 27 June, 


1851. 


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Sarah Mansur 


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" 5 Feb., 1852. 






1-2-2-1-3-4-6. 


William Scott 


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". 13 May, 1855; died 14 May, 


1858. 


; 


1-2-2-1-3-4-7. 


Charles William 


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" 20 July, 1856; " 8 June, 


1866. 




1-2-2-1-3-4-8. 


Clarissa M. 


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" 20 July, 1861; ♦♦ 18 July, 


1883. 


■ 


1-2-2-1-3-4-9. 


Mansur Can 


« 


« 25 Sept., 1867. 





Mr. Reid was born 10 DeCo, 181S, in Rockbridoje Co., Vir- 
ginia; son of Daniel and Letitia Reid. 

He engaged very extensively in pork packing in Richmond, 
Ind., not only contributing very much to its prosperity but prob- 
f ably doing more than any other single individual to make it the 

centre of that industry in eastern Indiana. 

He died at his home in Richmond, Ind., 3 March, 1890, after 
a long and painful illness. 



VII. 1-2-2- 1 -7- 1. Clara A. Holt, daughter of Clarissa 
Mansur, born 29 Dec, 1S26; married Lt.-Col. Thomas Jeffer- 
son Adams, of Chelmsford, Mass., son of William and Mary 

(Roby) Adams, born 4 May, 1805; died 11 Dec, 1881. He 
was a surveyor and farmer. 

.Child: — 

I-2-2-I-7-1-I. Charles W. S. Adams, born in North Chelmsford, 3 Dec, 

1850 ; married Alice J. Coburn, born 26 April, 1850. 



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I90 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

j VII. 1-2-2-4-1-10. Hon. ZoPHAR M. Mansur, of Ver- 

mont, son of Warren, born in Morgan, 19 Nov., 1843 ; married 
Nellie L. Newhall, of Norway, Me. 

Children : — 

1-2-2-4-1-10-1. Mabelle S., born 4 May, 1871; married Carl R. Storrs, of 

« 

^ Island Pond, Vt., son of Judge D. S. Storrs. They live 

at Hastings, Me., and have two children. 

1-2-2-4-I-10-2. Arthur G,, born 5 June, 1873. 

He alone bears the Mansur name in the third generation 
from Joseph Mansur. He is a jeweler at Burlington, Vt. 

1-2-2-4- 1 -10-3. A son, died in infancy. 

Zophar M. Mansur is thus referred to in an article in *' The 
Vermonter," a monthly magazine published at St. Albans, Vt. 

*'The Hon. Z. M. Mansur is admirably equipped for the 
responsible duties of this office (Collector of Customs, District 
of Memphremagog, Vt.). His experience in the government 
service and his business ability render his selection most fitting. 
Col. Mansur is one of Vermont's honored Union Veterans, and 
an empty sleeve testifies to his gallantry and heroism in defence 
of ' Old Glory.' Col. Mansur was a student of Montpelier 
Union School, a graduate of Derby, Vt., Academy. Enlisted 
August 13, 1S62, in Co. K, loth Vt. Regiment, and served 
three years (part of the time as corporal). He participated in 
the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Hanover Court 
House, Cold Harbor, Weldon Railroad, Monocacy, and Opequan 
Creek. In the latter battle, which took place Sept. 19, 1864, 
he lost his right arm. After being honorably discharged on 
account of the loss of his arm he studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1875. He was subsequently Postmaster at Island 
Pond and Deputy Collector of Customs in charge of the port 
of Island Pond under Harrison's administration. Col. Mansur 
was elected State's Attorney of Essex County in 18S6, Repre- 
sentative from Brighton in the Legislature of 1886, Senator 
from Essex County in 1888, President of the Vermont Officers' 
Reunion Society in 1889, Department Commander G. A. R., 
in 1892, and President of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
in 1894. 

**CoI. Mansur was elected Lieutenant-Governor of Vermont, 
in 1894. He has settled more estates and aftected the sale of 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 191 

more real estate than any other man in Essex County. He is 
one of the trustees of the Soldiers' Home at Bennington, Vt., 
Director of the National Bank of Derby Line, Vt." 

Col. Mansur located at Island Pond in 1S66, where he held 
the office of Postmaster from Feb., 1S67 until Dec, 18S4. 



VII. 1-2-2-6-4- 1. Hon. Charles H. Mansur, son of 
Charles Mansur, was born in Philadelphia. Pa., 6 March, 
1835. He received a common school education, and later 
entered Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass. About 1838, his 
father, Charles, with his four brothers, Isaiah, Moody, Stillman, 
and Porter, emigrated to Ray County, Missouri, taking Charles 
H. with him. He subsequentlv studied law and was admitted 
to the bar at Richmond, Mo., 30 August, 1S56. In 1856, he 
removed to Chillicothe, sslo., where he afterward resided. He' 
was a member of the Board of Education of Chillicothe for 
eight years ; was a member of the Democratic State Central 
Committee from 1864 till 1868 ; was a delegate to the National 
Democratic Convention in New York in 186S ; was prosecuting 
of Livingston County from 1875 till 1879; was a delegate at 
large to the Democratic Convention at Chicago in 1S84; ^^ 
1872 was a joint nominee of the Democracy and Liberal 
Republicans in the Tenth Missouri District, and was again the 
nominee of the Democracy in the same district in 1880; was 
elected as a Democrat to the 50th Congress from the Second 
Missouri District, comprising the counties of Carroll, Chariton, 
Grundy, Linn, Monroe, Livingston, Randolph, and Sullivan, 
and was re-electel to the 51st and 52d Congresses. He failed 
to be elected to the 53d Congress, and was appointed by Presi- 
dent Cleveland, Second Controller of the Treasury, which office 
he filled until his death, which occurred 16 April, 1895. 

He was a man of immense size, being six feet four inches in 
height, and broad in proportion, weighing about 280 pounds. 

He married 15 Sept., 1859, Demorus Broshee, of Palmyra, 

Mo. 

Children: — 

I-2-2-6-4-I-1. Charles W. born 
I -2-2-6-4-1-2. Jessie R. " 



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192 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

VII. I-2-2-6-2-I. Alvah Mansur, of Molinc, 111., born 
at Lowell, 5 Dec, 1833; died, Los Angeles, Cal., 8 Jan., 
1S98; married , Nellie Blockington, of Moline, 

111., who died in Kansas City, , 1871. 

Child : — 

I-2-2-6-2-I-I. A daughter who married George J. Kane. She died 10 Nov., 
1897, leaving two daughters and a son. 

He was eductated at the Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass., 
the same school which his cousin, the late Hon. Charles 
H. Mansur attended. After completing his education he' 
became connected with a wholesale hardware house in New 
York City, and represented them in the West. His first busi- 
ness venture was in the hardware business in Moline, 111. In 
1859 he became connected with the plow manufacturer, Mr. 
John Deene. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the 
19th Illinois Infantry and served with the rank of lieu- 
tenant. After the war he went West and engaged in mining in 
Central City, Colo., and served two terms in the Legislature of 
that State. - ' > . 

In 1869 he formed a partnership with Deene & Co., of Moline, 
111., and established the house of Deene, Mansur & Co., at 
Kansas City. In 1S74 he opened the house of Deene, Mansur 
& Co., in St. Louis, Mr. L. B. Tebbett, being associated with 
him. In 1S90 the firm of Deene, Mansur & Co., was dissolved, 
Deene & Co., taking the Kansas City business, and Mr. Mansur 
and Mr. Tebbett the St. Louis business. 

In 1876, Deene & Co. and Mr. Mansur organised the Deene 
& Mansur Co., at Molinc, 111., for the purpose of manufactur- 
ing corn planters. This institution has since taken a prominent 
place in manufacturing industries of this country, until to-day 
it is the largest concern of its kind in existence. At the time of 
his death, which occurred 8 January, 1898, at Los Angeles, 
Cal., Mr. Mansur was President of the Mansur-Tebbetts Imple- 
ment Co., of St. Louis and Dallas, Texas; President of the 
Mansur-Tebbetts Carriage Manufacturing Co., of St. Louis; 
Vice-President of the Deene & Mansur Co., of Moline; Presi- 
dent of the Charter Oak Stove and Range Co., St. Louis, and 
President or Director of a large number of other business insti- 









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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 193 

tutions. He also was largely interested in the lead and zinc 
mining operations in Missouri, and was a man of affairs gener- 
ally. His estate was estimated at four millions. 

Mr. Mansur was a man of strong and lovable character, with a 
deep sense of his obligations in every position of trust, and was 
one upon whom many leaned for advice and counsel in times of 
doubt and stress. 



Vn. 1-2-4-7-1-1. John H. Mansur, son of Moses Man- 
sur, was born in Cearnarvon Township, Berks Co., Pa., 25 
May, 1842. His parents returned to Philadelphia soon after, 
and resided tliere permanently. He attended the public schools 
until 1856. He learned the trade of gas-meter making and 
worked at it until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted 
.in Co. D, 75th Reg't Penna. Vols., August 23d, 1861, for three 
years. He was transferred to the U. S. Signal Corps in 1S62 
and served in that branch of the service till the expiration of 
his term of service. On 13 November, 1S66, he married 
Elizabeth Ann Lee, of Philadelphia. 

In June, 1890, he removed to Royersford, Pa., 'and engaged in 
the business of gas-meter making under the corporate title of the 
Keystone Meter Co., and is now President of the company. 
He is the compiler of this genealogy. 

Elizabeth Ann Lee, wife of John H. Mansur, was born 
31 July, 1839, at ISLanayunk, Philadelphia. Her father's name 
was William Lee, of Philadelphia, \vho was born 14 April, 
1 81 6. He died in the army in 1S64. Her mother's name was 
Elizabeth Ann Shoemaker, of Philadelphia, who was born 23 
Dec, 1815, and died 4 Feb., 1S92, at Royersford, Pa., in the 
78th year of her age. 



VII. 1-2-4-7-1-2. Annie Elizabeth Mansuk, daughter 
of Moses Mansur, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 23 May, 1845. 
She was married to William S. Schofield, pf Holmesburg, Pa., 
who died 23 Nov. 1876, at Philadelphia, of disease contracted 
there. She married, second, 13 June, 18S8, William P. Cahill, 
of Philadelphia. She has no children by either marriage. 



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194 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

William Schofield was born at Holmesburg, Pa., on 37 May, 
1849. He was the son of William and Alice Schofield of the 
same place. He was a cloth finisher by occupation, thoiioh he 
worked at other pursuits, and was one of the guards at the Cen- 
tennial Exposition at Philadelphia, in 1876. 

William P. Cahill was born 16 March, 1849, in Ireland. He 
is the son of Richard and Alice CahiH. His parents came to 
Philadelphia in 1852, when he was about three years old, and he 
lived there till 1S96, when he removed to Royersford, Pa. He 
is a bricklayer. ^ 



VII. 1-2-4-7-1-3. George Washingtox Mansur, son of 
Moses, was born 23 Oct., 1S48, at Philadelphia. He learned 
the trade of gas-meter making and worked at it till his death, 
which occurred 2 Feb., 1S72. 

He was of a bright, cheerful disposition, and his early death 
was much regretted by all who knew him. 



VII. I -2-4-7- 1 -4. Charles Hunter Maxsur, son of 
Moses, born in Philadelphia, 29 Aug., 1851 ; married • June, 
1S76, Jennie Dudgeon, of Philadelphia, who was born 5 Aug., 

•857- 

:EN : — 

born 2 Feb., 1877. 

24 May, 1878. 

II Sept., 1880. 

6 Feb., 18S4. 

18 Jan., 1886. 

I-2-4-7-1-4-6. Catherine H., *' 16 March, 1888. 

Charles Hunter Mansur, is a carpenter by trade, and has al- 
ways lived in Philadelphia. In 1S72 he went into the regular 
army, serving two years in the 2nd U. S. Cavalry. 



Children : — 






1-2-4-7-1-4-1. 


Jennie, 


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George \V., 


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Charles, 


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Warren B., 


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William, 


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VII. 1-2-4-7-1-6. Warren Bailey Mansur, son of 

Moses, born in Philadelphia, 26 Jan., i860; married 14 Sept., 

1887, Sarah E. Xeinberg, of Philadelphia. 

Children: — 

1-2-4.7-1-6-1. William N., born 15 Oct., 18S9. 
1.2-4. 7. 1-6-2. Annie C, " 25 Sept., 1891. 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 195 

1-2-4-7-1-6-3. Albert W., born 21 Feb., 1893. ' 

1-2-4-7-1-6-4. Katy E., " 13 Oct , 1894. 

1-2-4-7-1-6-5. Warren B., " 4 Dec, 1895. 

1-2-4-7-1-6-6. George E., " l March, 1897. 

Warren Bailey Mansur learned the trade of gas-meter mak- 
ing, and has worked at it ever since in New York and Philadel- 
phia. In 1S90 he removed to Royersford, Pa., where he now 
resides, and where five of his children were born. 



VII. 1-2-4-7-4-2. Ci.ARA Inez Mansur, daughter of Wil- 
liam, was born on 2S June, 1849, at I^Iethuen, Mass. On 11 
Dec, 1S67, she was married to Joseph Richardson, of Dracut, 
Mass., by whom she had one child. Joseph Richardson, 
was born in Dracut, Mass, He is the son of Oliver Richard- 
son and Hepzibah Jane Bailey, of Dracut. He is a farmer 
and much respected in the community in which he lives. He is 
a brother to Edwin Richardson, who married his wife's sister, 
Myra A. Mansur. 

Child : — 

1. 2-4.7-4-2-1. Annie Mabel, Lorn 18 Dec, 186S. 



VII. 1-2-4-7-4-3. MvRA Agnes Mansur, daughter of 
William Mansur, was born 7 March, 185 1, at Methuen, Mass. 
On 24 Nov., 1S72, she was married to Edwin Richardson, of 
Dracut, Mass., her brother-in-law, by whom she has two sons. 

Edwin Richardson was born at Dracut, Mass. He is the son 
of Oliver Richardson and Hepzibah Jane Bailey, of Dracut. 
He is a prosperous farmer, and enjoys the confidence and 
respect of his friends and neighbors. He is a brother of Joseph 
Richardson, and their wives are sisters. 

Children : — 

I-2-4-7-4-3-1. Charles B., born 22 Sept., 1874. 
1-2-4-7-4-3-2. Chester W., •• 30 April, 1877. 



VII. 1-2-4-7-6-1. Charles Kendall Mansur, son of 
Charles, born in Haverhill, 27 Feb., 1850; married, first, 30 
Jan., 1878, Cora H. Robinson, of Cornville, Me., who died 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 



without issue. He married, second, 6 Oct., 1881, Elizabeth 
Gad, of Exeter, N. H. 

Child: — 

I-2-4-7-6-1-1. Charles, born 5 Oct., 1882; died 27 April, 1886. 

Charles Kendall Mansur learned the trade of carriage build- 
ing with his father, and upon his retirement succeeded to his 
business, which he now carries on. 



VIL 1-2-4-7-6-2. George Henry Mansur, son of Chas. 
Mansur, born in Haverhill, 26 Oct., 1S54; married 6 Sept., 
1S77, Maria E. Haughey. 

Children : — 

I-2-4-7-6-2-1. George B., born 14 May, 1882. 

1-2-4-7-6-2-2. James H., " 25 Oct., 18S6; died 7 Aug., 1888. 

1-2-4-7-6-2-3. John P., " Oct., 1890. 



VII. 1-2-4-7-6-4. Frank Daniel Mansur, son of Charles, 
born in Haverhill, 28 Aug., 1863; married 26 June, 1889, 
Alice Ingham. 

Child: — 

I-2-4-7-6-4-1. Frank L. F., born 3 May, 1890. 



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EIGHTH GENERATION. 



VIII. 1-2- 1 -2-4- 1. Ernest Milton Mansur, son of Charles 
E., born 24 Feb., 1867 ; married 10 Dec, 1S90, to Emma Jose- 
phine Sailers, of Cortland, N. Y. No children. 
•'" Ernest M. Mansur is a graduate of the Ricker Classical 
Institute. Since 1S91 he has been in the seed business at Floral 
Park, N. Y., with John L. Childs. He has helped compile 
this record. 



VIII. 1-2-2-1-3-1-1. Franklaxd M. Wright, son of 

Mary Ann Mansur; married 6 May, 1856, Laura Lawrence, of 

Dublin, Ind. He was born May ist, 1833, and died suddenly 

of heart failure 4 February, 1889, in his 64th year. His wife 

was born 13 June, 1836, daughter of Edmund and Esther 

Lawrence, of Dublin, Ind. 

Children : — 

1-2-2-1-3-1-1-1. Perry L. Wright, born 5 May, 1859; married 12 March, 

1890, Adele, daughter of Robert F. Campbell, of Chicago. 
I-2-2-I-3-I-I-2. Fanny E. Wright, born 8 Feb., 1861; died 12 Feb., 1S74. 
I-2-2-I-3-I-I-3. May L. " " 31 Dec, 1865; married 8 April, 1890, 

Wm. J. Cook, of Richmond, Ind.; live in Chicago. 



Vin. 1-2-2-1-3-1-2. Mansur H. Wright, son of Mary Ann 

Mansur ; married 5 Oct., 1864 ; Jennie R. Van Doren. He was 

born 7 March, 1835, and died 27 Dec, 1S85, of diabetes, in his 

51st year. His wife was born 13 March, 1842, daughter of 

Rev. Wm. Van Doren. 

Childrkn : — ^ 

I-2-2-I-3-I-2-1. Annie W^right, born 21 Nov., 1865; died I June, 1888; 

married 23 Sept., 1885, Frank Keys Dunn, of Chicago. 
1-2-2-1-3-1-2-2. Willie Wright, born 5 Sept., 1871. 

197 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 



VIII. I-2-2-I -3-2-6. John Quincy Ferguson, son of 
Clarissa Mansur, born 30 Dec, 1854; now resides in St. Louis, 
Mo. He married 7 June, 1S76, Mattie Dilley. His wife 
studied for the stage and became a very successful actress. 



VIII. I -2-2- 1 -3-2-7. Edw^ard W. Ferguson, son of 
Clarissa Mansur, born 17 Nov., 1S56; now resides in Chicago. 
He married i Jan., 1880, Maria R. Dunn. No children. 



VIII. I -2-2- 1 -3-4-5. Sarah Mansur Reid, daughter of 
Sarah Jane Mansur; born at Richmond, Ind., 5 Feb., 1852; 
married 13 Aug., 1873, Benjamin B. Myrick, Jr., of Richmond, 
Ind. 



Children: — 

1-2-2-1-3-4-5-1. Florence Reid M^-rick, born 17 June, 1874. 

I-2-2-1-3-4-5-2. William Benjamin Myrick, born 12 Feb., 1878. . - 

1-2-2-I-3-4-5-3. Clara May 



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VIII. 1-2-2-1-3-5-2. Cecilia Mansur, daughter of Isaiah 
Mansur; born in Indianapolis, Ind., 17 July, 1865; married 10 
Nov., 1886, Clarence Wolsin, of Cincinnati, O. He was born 
at Cincinnati, O., 20 Aug., iS53,and died at Indianapolis, Ind., 
26 Feb., 1897, of nervous exhaustion. 

Children: — 

I-2-2-I-3-5-2-1. Cecilia Wolsin, born 22 May, 18S4. 

1-2-2-1-3-5-2-2. Robert Mansur " " 2 July, 18S8. 



VIII. 1-2-2-6-4-1-1. Charles W. Mansur, son of Hon. 
Charles H. Mansur; born ;' married 11 March, 

1886, Frankie Isham, of Cofleyville, Kan. 

Child: — 

1-2-2-6-4-1-1-1. , Charles T., born. 

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VIII. 1-2-2-1-3-4-8. Clarissa M. Reid, daughter of Sarah 
Jane Mansur, born at Richmond, Ind., 20 July, 1861 ; died 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 199 

18 July, 1883; married 11 Oct., 1882, J. R. McKee, of Rich- 
mond, Ind., who, after his wife's death, removed South. 

Child: — 

I-2-2-I-3-4-8. Paul Reid McKee, born 7 July, 1883. 



VIII. 1-2-2-1-3-5-1. Joseph Brown Mansur, was born 4 
May, 1863, at Indianapolis, Ind. On i March, 1S92, he mar- 
ried Edith W. Hartel, of Holmesburg, Pa., and settled in 
Indianapolis. He was a lawyer, though he never practiced 
actively at the bar, but devoted his attention to the manage- 
ment of his father's estate. He died suddenly of appendicitis, 
in Chicago, 2 Aug, 1S94, deeply regretted by all who knew 
him. 

Edith Warrington Hardel, wife of Joseph Brown Mansur, is 
the daughter of Andreas Hartel and Elizabeth Warrington, both 
of Holmesburg, Pa. She was born 4 Nov., 1S65. After Mr. 
Mansur's death she removed to Philadelphia, her present home. 



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ADDENDA TO THE MANSUR FAMILY. 



From Andover records : John Mansur, of Methuen, and Han- 
nah Lovejoy, of South Parish of Andover, intend marriage 3 
June, 1732. Married by Mr. Phillips, 21 Dec, 1732. 



The following book is in the possession of a member of the 
family: "A preparation for Judgment, a sermon, preached in 
London, wherein is shew'd, etc., by the late Rev. Mr. J. (i. e. 
Jeremiah) l^urroughs." [Date torn off.] It is a small 32mo., 
and on fly leaves is inscribed : "In ye year 1723 ye first month 
Ms. Marcey Foster her Book prise is eight pence. If i it loose 
and it find pray give it me for it is (mine)." 

Opposite, in darker ink, and probably later hand, ise: " Mar- 
cey sister Hannah is (Foster) ? '* On leaf 

2 is : " hannah lovejoy John Manssur his book 1744*' 

On last cover is: " Sherebiah Ballerd John Mansur his 
Book." 



James Mansur and Polly Pierce, both of Belfast, Me., married 
there 7 April, 1S05. 



3 June, 1663. At a court held at Dover, N. H., John Men- 
seaw (possibly Mensear or jMenseard) vs. defendant not named. 
** His charge cannot be heard by reason of defendant's death." 
Vol. II., fo. 75 1 Provincial Court Papers. 



Wallingford, Conn., Records. 
Hulda, daughter of John and Rachel Mansur, born 6 Apr., 
1766. 



Marriages on Methuen Records. 
Samuel Bodwell and Elizabeth Mansur, both of Methuen, 
were married 28 September, 175S, by Rev. Christopher Sargent. 

200 



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A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. . 201 

Samuel Mansur, of Methuen, and Sarah Varnum, of Dracut, 
were mairled 1 May, 1765, by Rev. Christopher Sargent. 

Phineas Messer and Rebekah Mansur were married 31 Janu- 
ary, 178S, by Rev. Simon F. Williams. 

John Mansur and Susanna Morrill were married 9 December, 
1791, by Rev. Simon F. .Williams. 

Elijah Mansur and Lucy Messer were married i December, 
1 791, by Rev. John H. Stevens. 

Francis Richardson, Jr., and Mehitable Mansur, both of 
Methuen, were married i April, 179S, by Stephen Barker, Esq. 

James Mansur, of Dracut, and ISIary Harris, of Methuen, 
were married iS April, 177^1 by Rev. Christopher Sargent. 

Trueworthy White, Jr., and Sarah Ann Mansur, both of 
Methuen, were married 5 September, 1S31, by Rev. CO. 
Kimball. 



Intentions of Marriage : Methuen. 

Between Theodore Beernard, c^f iMethuen, and Anna Mansur, 
of Dracut, were published 3 February, iSoo. 

Between Oliver Whittier, of Methuen, and Hannah Lovejoy 
Mansur, were published 2 November, iSoo. 

Between Samuel Richardson, 3rd, of Methuen, and Abigail 
Mansur, of Dracut, were published 7 August, 1807. 



Births : Methuen. 

Hannah Mansur, daughter of John Mansur, Jr., and Ruth, 
his wife, was born 37 September, 1764. 

John Mansur, son of John and Ruth Mansur, was born 17 
July, 1766. 

Elijah Jvlansur, son of John and Ruth Mansur, was born 23 
April, 1768. 

Daniel Mansur, son of John and Ruth Mansur, was born 
5 December, 1769. 

Elijah Mansur, son of Elijah Mansur and Lucy, his wife, was 
born 29 June, 1792. 



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202 A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE MANSUR FAMILY. 

Lucy Mansur, daughter of Elijah and Lucy Mansur, was born 
13 October, 1794. 

Leonard Mansur, son of Elijah and Lucy Mansur, was born 
26 January, 1797* 

Asa Mansur, son of Elijah and Lucy Mansur, was born 19 
February, i799- 

John Mansur, son of Elijah and Lucy Mansur, was born 29 
April, 1801. 



In Visitation of Norfolk we find the following : — 

Richard Mansuer, son of Henry Mansuer, of Norfolk, married 

Katherine Berkham. Children: Henry, John, Katherine, and 

one other. No date given. 

* * * William Mansuer, Parson of Sharington, a witness 
to a will proved in 1558. * * * Richard Mansuer's will 
proved 30th of Jan., 1592. * * * Roger Mansure, of North 
Creek. Richard, 2nd, son of John Mansuer, married Alice 
Pepis, widow, about 1613.*** * 

In other publications appear records of numerous marriages 
of Mansers in different parts of England. 



Burke gives the following arms as borne by Mansur : — 
Arms — Vair a bend Or. 

Crest — A pelican's nest Or, 3 young ones Sa., thereon a peli- 
can vulning herself proper. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, HASS., COUNTY COURT RECORDS. 



{Continued from Julyy igoi^ P^g^ ^4^-) 

(50 

[i2i] Legg, Elizabeth, of Marblehead, wife of John, pre- 
sented for slandering Rev. Wm. Walton. Benjamin Parmiter, of 
Marblehead, dep : that ye wife of John Legge, upon a Lord's 
day morning coming from ye Meeting upon occasion of Mr. 
Waltun's reproving one that slept in ye meeting, broke out 
against him and said y* we were all a company of fooles and if 
wee did follow his teaching wee should all go to hell. 

Jno. Codner, aged about 34, dep : that Elizabeth, wife of John 
Legge said Mr. Walton is a catch-pole and all that follow his 
teaching shall goe to hell and be damned. 

[122]' WiLKiNS (Wilkenson) Samuell, of Lynn, presented 
for lying. Joane Veal, dep : She wished to buy a kettle. Mr. 
W. said he had bought a lot of brass and iron and would get 
her one. Paid him 4s. His house were his money was, burned 
down. Pitied him and helped get another house for him. In- 
vited my husband, myself, and many others to his father's house 
on General thanksgiving day where he said he would have 
"beer" that was 7 years old and that his father had 15 score 
peices of plate, silver bowles, and basens, which she should see. 

Emanuel Clarke certifies to the above. 

[123] Writs not Entered, June 7, 1660. 

Marshall, Thomas, of Lynn, carpenter, vs. Capt. Tho. 
Marshall, of Lynn, debt. Will. Longley, of Lynn, per Cur., 
29 : 3 : 1660. Theophilus Baley, of Lynn, Constable. 

203 






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204 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Whitticker, Abraham, of Haverhill, vs. John Godfrey, of 
Andover, for damages, etc. Richard Littlehale, of Haverhill, per 
Cur., Apr. 1 6, 1660. Michaell Emerson, of Haverhill, Con- 
stable. 

Hathorne, John, of Salem, vs. Theophilus Baley, of Lynn, 
for debt. 

(52) 

[124] Ruck, John, of Salem, assignee of Thomas Ruck, 
of Lynn, vs. Geoges Halsall, for boarding, clothing, etc., from 
June, 1656. Jonath Negus, of Boston, per Cur. Edward 
Mitchellsonne, of Cambridge, Constable or Marshall Gen'l. 

Jewett, Joseph, of Ipswich, vs. Twiford West, of Ipswich, 
refusixng to give security for payment of ;^30. 

Hathorne, John, vs. Joseph Armstrong, debt. 

Baley, Theophilus, of Lynn, Constable ordered to replevin a 
pair of oxen of John Mansfield's, now in the hands of John 
Ramsdale, both of Lynn, 13 : 4: 1660. 

Jewett, Joseph, of Ipswich, vs. George Hadley, of Ipswich, 
debt. Apr. 4, 1660. 

BuRGES, Robert, of Lynn, vs. Samuell Bennet, of Lynn, 
debt. William Langley, of Lynn, per Cur. 

Antram, Thomas, of Lynn, vs. Isaack Burnap, of Reading, 
debt. [125] Thomas Golthrite, of Salem, Constable. 

(53) 

[126] KiNDRiCKE, John, of Ipswich, vs. Peeter Coffin, of 
Newbury, debt : bound from Tristram Coffin, of Newbury, his 
father unto s^ Kindrick as assignee of John Godfrey, of Andover, 
June 4, 1660. 

ToMPSON, Symon, of Ipswich, vs. Isaiah Wood, of Ipswich, 
debt. 

Roots, Josiah, of Salem, vs. William Pitts, of Salem, tres- 
pass on land, digging clay and building a house on it. Apr. 2, 
1660. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 205 

Benett, Samuell, of Lynn, vs, Robert Burges, of Lynn, 
debt. 

[127] Trask, William, of Salem, vs. Thomas Robblns, 
of Salem, defamation, saying his daughter, Susan Trask, run 
after and was common for everybody. June 18, 1660. 

PiCKMAN, Nathanyell, of Salem, attorney for Peeter Paulfry, 
vs. Samuell Benett, of Lynn, debt due Paulfry for appletrees. 

(54) ' 

[127] Wade, Jonathan, of Ipswich, vs. Isaiah Wood, of 
Ipswich, debt. Theophilus Wilson, of Ipswich, Constable. 

Presentments. 



Charles Gott, 
Tho. Spooner, 
Tho. Antrum, 
Wa : (Walter) Price, 

Myghcll Shafflen, 

Phillip Veren, 

Veren, wife of Phillip, 



Rich : Bishop, 

Fra : Skerye, 

Nath : Putnam, 

Grand Jury, all of Salem. 
Shattogg, wife of Samuell, 
Gaskin, " Samuell, 
Salmon, Samuel, servant 



of 



Elizabeth Kiching,wlfe of John, Samuell Shattogg, 
Buffum, wife of Rob't, Smale (Small) John, Sr., 

Smale, wife of John, 
Edward Wharton, 
Danell Suthack, 
William A'laston, 
John Hill, 

Ston, wife of Robert, 
All of Salem, for absence from meeting. 

(55) 

Batter, Edmund, of Salem, presented for saying Elizabeth 
Kiching, of Salem, had been a powowing and calling her a 
quking slutt. Witnesses : John Ward, Thomas Mekings. 

Phelps, Hanna, wife of Nich's, of Salem, for saying that Mr. 
Higginson sent abroade hig wolves and blood hounds amongst the 



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Joyas, 


Needham, " 


Anthony, 


Sutheck, " 


John, 


Phelps, " 


Nicholas, 


Gardner, " 


George, 


Gardner, " 


Richard, 


John Burtton, 


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2o6 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

sheep and Iambs and the priests are deceivers of the people. 
Proved and sentenced to be whipt or pay ;i^5,— 50^ now and 50^ 
when Court calls for it. Witnesses, Thomas Flint, John Upton, 
all of Salem. William Flint, promises to pay the first 50^. 

Smale, John, Jr., of Salem, for saying Mr. Higgenson 
preached damnable lies. Witnesses, Isaack Cook, Hewgh 
Johnes (Jones). 

Wilkinson, Samuell, of Lynn, for lying. Witnesses, 
Emanuell Clark, Joan Veale. 

PiCKWORTH, John, Sr., of Manchester, and John, Samuell, 

(56) 

Joseph, [128] sons of John, Sr., for breach of peace, in fighting 
with John Norman, Sr., John Norman, Jr., Tho : Bishop, 

Norman's servant, all of Manchester. William Benett, 

Tho : Millett, of Gloucester, Jurors, witnesses. 

Pattey, Nathaniell, of Salem, absence from public worship. 
Richard Stachouse, Tho : Chubb, Avis Chubb, all of Salem, 
witnesses. 

Heires, Ralph, of Marblehead, disguised in drink. Joseph 
Dollyver, John Cowman, both of Marblehead, witnesses. 

Winter, Edward, of Marblehead, same offence j same wit- 
nesses. 

Skiner, Gabrell, of Marblehead, same offence. Tymothy 
Lang, Jno. Northey, both of Marblehead, witnesses. 

Nicholson, Edm'd, of Marblehead, same offence. Joseph 
Dollver, Mr. Francis Johnson, witnesses. 

HiBBURD, Joan, of Salem, wife of Robert, for saying that 
Liddy and Mary Grouer, of Marblehead, were the veriest Lyers 
at Bass ryver and they were able to lye the dyvell out of Hell. 

[128] (57) 

Henry Hereck, Jr., Mary Herek, both of Salem, witnesses. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 207 

Price, Walter, of Salem, foreman grand jury. 

[129] Warrants to Choose Jurors, and Summons 

Persons Presented. 

Michaell Shafflin, Phillip Veren, wife of Joslah Sothwick, 
wife of Richard Gardner, William Mastone, all of Salem, for 
absence from public worship. 

. Batter, Edmond, of Salem, summoned for oprobrlous words 
to Goody (Ellzth) KItchln. John Ward, Tho. Meklngs, both of 
Salem, witnesses. 

Phelps, Hana, of Salem, wife of Nicholas, for saying Mr. 
HIgg;eson, of Salem, sent abroad his wolves and bloodhounds 
among the sheep and lambs. Tho : Flint, John Upton, both 
of Salem, witnesses. 

Smale, John, Jr., of Salem, saying Mr. Higgeson preached 
damnable lies. Isaack Cook, Hugh Joanes, both of Salem, wit- 
nesses. Tho : Goldtwrlte, Tho : Rootes, both of Salem, Con- 
stables. 

[130] Wife of George Gardner, wife of Samuell Shattock, 
wife of John KItchln, wife of Robert BufFum, wife of Anthony 

[130] (58) 

Needham, wife of John Sothwick, Danyell Sothwick, John Smale, 
Sam'U Salmon, all of Salem, for absence from meeting. John 
Porter, Edmond Batter, Thomas Putnam, Nicolas Potter, all of 
Salem, witnesses. June 27, 1660. 

Henry Collins, Sr., Goodman Farrer, Edward Richards, 
Mathew Farrenton, Goodman Ramesden, all of Lynn, tryal 
jurors. 

Henry Rhodes, of Lynn, Constable. 

Goodman Barterum, Jonathan Hudson, both of Lynn, chosen 
Constables. 

John Feske, of Wenham, chosen trial juror, 30 : 3 : 1660. 

John Dodge, of Wenham, Constable. 



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2o8 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Nicholson, Elizabeth, of Marblehead, wife of Edmund, sum- 
moned for absence* from meeting. Moses Maverick, Tho : 
Pittman, both of Marblehead, witnesses. 

(59) 
[131] Legg, Elizabeth, of Marblehead, wife of John, for 
saying if the people followed the preaching of Mr. (Wm.) Wal- 
ton they would all go to hell. John Codner, Elizabeth Codner, 
Benjamin Parmiter, all of Marblehead, witnesses. Veren Hill- 
yard, of Salem, Clerk. Joseph Dalaber, Constable. 

[1,32] Batter, Edmond, of Salem, Treasurer, his account 
for the County of Essex. Thomas Putnam, Henry Skery, Mr. 
Gidney, Samuel Coring,"^' John Southwick, Nicholas Phelps, 
Joshua Buffham, Daniel Southwick, Provided Southwick, Tho. 
Bracket, Alistor Gonid, Joshua Turland, Samuel Archard, Roger 
Haskall, all of Salem. Mr. Henry Rhoades, Constable, Tho. 
Newell, Tho. Rooten, all of Lynn, named in account. 

(60) 

•[132] Tho. Rex, of Boston, for carrying Lidea, the Quaker, 
to Boston. Tho. Barnes, of Salem, named in treasurer's account. 

• September Term, 1660. 

[133] Edmands, William, of Lynn, vs. Henry Green, of 
Hampton, for curing the leg of Mary Greene, daughter of said 
Henry. Abraham Drake, of Hampton, Marshal. Tho. Brad- 
bury, of Salisbury, Recorder. 

William Edmands, of Lynn, acknowledged at Court in Ips- 
wich, March 27, that there was no bargain about curing the leg 
of Greene's child. Mary Greene, of Hampton, daughter of 
Henry, cure effected by wife of Wm. Edmonds. 

Farnam, John, of Boston, assignee of William and Ann Ed- 
monds, of Lynn, vs. Henry Greene, of Hampton ; said Greene 
some years since had a daughter called Marie Greene, some time 

* Corning. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 209 

a patient under the hands of Mr. Starr, of Charlestown, for the 
cure of a very dangerous sore leg which daughter ye said Greene, 
brought afterwards to said Ann Edmonds to be cured, for which cure 
he engaged to pay with a mare colt. Sore cured in 1 1 months. 
Mr. (Dr. Anthony) Crossbey, of Rowley, named as a practitioner. 
Capt. Tho. Marshall, Jo. Paul, Joseph Edmonds, Matthew 
Price, John Edmonds, John Smith, all of Lynn, Giles Fifield, of 
Charlestown, witnesses in above case. 

(61) 

[134] Tho. Kimbol, Tho. Marston, William Molton, 
Christopher Palmer, all of Hampton ; Ben. Kinboll, John Eaton, 
both of Salisbury ; Joseph Hutchins, of Boston, mentioned in 
margin. 4 mo., 1660. 

[135] \Vm. Edmonds, of Lynn, appoints Joseph Armitage, 
of Lynn, his attorney to prosecute his cause against Henry 
Greene, of Hampton. George Emery, John Hathorne, of Lynn, 
witnesses. Sept. 24, 1660. Henry Greene's bill of costs. 
Mr. Crossbey, of Rowley, Mr. Fieffield, of Charlestown, 
Thomas Kemball, of Hampton, Mr. (Thus.) Bradbury, of Salis- 
bury, named in above bill. 

William Edmonds' receipts from Henry Greene. Edward 
Baker, of Lynn, Joseph Huchens, of Boston, witnesses. Tho. 
Bradbury, of Salisbury, Recorder. 

[136] Joseph Hutchens, of Boston, son-in-law to Wm. 
Edmonds, of Lynn, deposes that said Edmonds went to receive a 
colt of Henry Greene, of Hampton, for a cure his wife per- 
formed on Greene's child. Tho. Bradbury, Vera Copia, Oct. 6, 

(62) 

1659. Abraham Greene, of Hampton, aged about 16, Iseke 
Greene, of Hampton, aged about 15, sons of Henry Greene: 
depositions about condition of colt. 

[137] Tho. Wiggin, Magistrate, March 22, 1659-60. 

Matthew Price, aged about 31, deposes being on his journey 
to the town of Lynn in January, 1657, ^^^i^ ^o ^^^ house of 



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210 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

William Edmonds, and there saw Mary Greene, of Hampton, 
daughter of Henry Greene, who had formerly been under the 
care of Tho. Starre, of Charlestown, physician, for cure of a sore 
leg. About a year after being that way again, saw her going 
very well, and said Mary told me her leg was well. Richard 
Russell, Magistrate. April 24, 1660. 

John Ilsey, of Salisbury, aged about 50 : deposition, 6 Oct., 
1659. 

[138] Benjamin Kimball, of Salisbury, aged about 24, 
deposes that William Edmond, of Lynn, brought a mare colt to 
me to keep a certain time, and said colt was in fine condition and 
recovered from his miren. March 27, 1660. 

Giles P'ifield, of Charlestown, deposes that Mary Greene was 
able to wash dishes, sweep house, and do general work while un- 
der care of Mr. Thomas Starre, and the day goodman Greene 
took away his daughter I rode with them to Hampton, and she 
complained of her leg being sore. Daniel Denison, of Ipswich, 
Magistrate. Sept. 26, 1660. 

[139] Anthony Stanyan, of Hampton, deposes: sold to 
Henry Greene a mare colt. Tho. Wiggin, Magistrate. March 
22, 1659-60. 

John Smith, of Newbury, deposes : March 27, 1660: was a 
boarder at the house of WDlIam Edmond, when Greene brought 

(63) 

his daughter to be cured, and would give her a cow in lieu of 40 
shillings, as he wanted the money, and pay all charges she might 
be at; would call in about a fortnight but did not come under 13 
weeks, and she would not undertake a cure until she saw him 
again. Jno. Edmond, of Lynn, son of Wm. Edmonds. Tho. 
Bradbury, of Salisbury, Commissioners. 

Joseph Edmands, of Lynn, aged about 17, son of William. 

[140] John Stanyan, of Hampton, aged about 18, deposes : 
went and brought the colt for Greene, which he bought of my 
father and was in good condition. Tho. Wiggin, Magistrate. 
22 : I : 1659-60. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 211 

Tho. Kimball, of Hampton, aged about 26, deposes : often 
heard Mr. Edmonds say that Greene was to give him the colt for 
cure of his daughter's leg. 

Tho. Kimball, of Hampton, aged about 26, names Mr. Jno. 
Redman, of Hampton. 

[141] Anthony Crosbie, of Rowley, aged 23, deposes: had 
heard Goody Edmonds, of Lynn, say that the girl's illness was 
the King's evil, and she had cured it. I was asked to examine 
the leg and thought the bone not sufficiently sound. John Paul, 
of (Maiden?), aged about 32, deposes: saw Mary Greene, of 
Hampton, within a few days after she came to the house of 
William Edmonds, of Lynn, and thought her leg dangerously 
-sore. Richard Russell, of Charlestown, Magistrate. 24 : 2 : 
1660. 

Bridget Huggins, of Hampton, aged about 44, deposes : was 
asked by goodwife Greene to examine her child's leg ; and 
thought it no better than when she went to the bay ; this was 
about a week after she came home. 

■ (64) 

[142] Robert Lord, of Ipswich, aged 57, deposes: said 
that wife of Wm. Edmonds affirmed in court that she took a bone 
from the child's leg five or six inches long and was the marrow 
bone. 

Tho. Kimball, of Hampton, testified to the same. July 30, 
1660. 

Henry Greene, of Hampton, aged about 40, positively affirms 
he never told any one that it was the colt of his own mare, and 
never said it was the colt I promised, in case the cure was made. 

Giles Fifield, of Charlestown, deposes : when Mr. Greene 
took his child from Charlestown the flesh was from the bone but 
she could go up and down, and a month after as I was going to 
Lynn, went to Edmonds' house, Goody Edmond asked if I had 
come to see my cousin, and she hoped to have her home in six 
weeks. The flesh then had grown near one fourth of an inch 
on the bone. When I went back to Charlestown told Mr. 



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212 ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 

Starre the condition of child's leg, and he said he would eat a 
firebrand if she cured it ; and some time after I spoke with' Mr. 
Greene, of Hampton, my uncle, and he told me that he was to 
give his mare's colt for the cure of the leg. 6:8: 1654. 

Jon. Redman, of Hampton, aged about 42, deposes : was in 
the year 1658 at house of William Edmond, of Lynn, with 
Abraham Drake, of Hampton, and goody Edmonds said if good- 
man Greene would tarry about a week longer, he could have his 
daughter with him. 

Sarah Jenkins, aged about 43, deposes : saw Mary Greene 
when she first came to goodwife Edmond's and saw the bone 
that was taken out of her leg and said Dr. Crosby, of Rowley, 
remarked he would not have done it for ;{^50.- Richard Russell, 
of Charlestown, Alagistrate. 24 : 2 : 1660. 

(65) 

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[143] Thos. Marshall, of Lynn, deposes : saw the child at 
house of Mr. (Thos.) Starre, of Charlestown, and afterwards at 
the house of William Edmonds, of Lynn, when her leg was 
almost well. 

[144] Richard Ormsby, of Salisbury, aged 52, deposes: 
that A'Ir. Edmonds, of Lynn, did bring a colt to Salisbury which 
was a very poor one and lowsie, and said Edmonds was afraid to 
carry it over the ferry or send it back to Greene. Benj. Kim- 
ball, of Salisbury, being there was desired to keep it, she being 
weak and feeble. 

Jno. Eaton, of Salisbury, aged about 40, deposition. 

Thomas Marston, of Hampton, deposes: heard Henry 
Greene say that goodman Edmonds was to have the colt for cure 
of his dauo-hter's leg. 

Joseph Hutchins, of Boston, deposition. 

[145] Abraham Drake, of Hampton, deposition. 

William Moulton, of Hampton, deposition. Selectman, 1658. 

Benjamin Kimball, of Salisbury, aged about 23, deposition. 

Christopher Palmer, of Hampton, deposes : was at house of 
Greene and had some discourse about the colt. 



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ESSEX COUNTY, MASS., COURT RECORDS. 



213 



[146] Sarah Ormsby, of Salisbury, deposition, names good- 
man Insloe (Winsley), of Salisbury. • 

Thomas Kimball, of Hampton, deposition. 

Cornelius ( ), of Hampton, deposition, aged about 

50, servant to Mr. Stanyan. 22 : i : 1659-60. 

Robert Tuck, of Hampton, deposes : goodman Greene showed 
me his daughter's leg and thought it was no better. 6:8: 1659. 
End of Voluine f., Essex Eiles. 






I 



QUERIES. 

Cheshire. — Thomas Cheshire, Jr., was one of the grantees 
of Burlington, Vt., in 1763, and the same year, as of Norwich, 
Oyster Bay, N. Y., sold his right to Edward Burling, of Long 
Reach, Westchester. Jeremiah Cheshire witnesses the deed. 
Wanted, information concerning the parentage and family of 
Thomas Cheshire. 

Russell. — Eleazer Russell, Esq., of Portsmouth, N. H., an 
original grantee of Burlington, had son Eleazer, of Portsmouth, 
1790, Wanted, information concerning the two Russells and 
their families. 

Collins. — Wanted, ancestry of Capt. John Collins, one of 
the early settlers of Burlington, Vt. 

Beebe. — Wanted, information concerning Ashahel Beebe, of 
Canaan, Conn., about 1790. 

SuYDAM or Sardam, Jacobus, an original grantee of Burling- 
ton. Information concerning him is desired. 

Marble. — Eleazer Marble was of Chesterfield, N. H., in 
1788. Wanted, his ancestry and family. 

Barrow. — Byrdand Barrow was of New York City, mer- 
chant, 1792. Wanted, information concerning him. 

Hauxhurst. — Information desired concerning William and 
Daniel Hauxhurst, of New York City and East Chester and 
Fordham, 1750— 1775. They were interested in the Sterling 
Iron Works, and in Vermont and Jersey grants. 



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SOnE NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY.* 



The origin of the name and family of Tingley, or Tingle, is 
unknown. In 1653 ^"^ William Tingle was of Lynn, and in 
a court deposition relating to the troubles over the iron works 
there, he is described as " Old Tingle," a collier. He bought 
of the company the services of four Scots for the term of three 
years. (Essex Co. Court Records.^ 

Among the passengers on the " Planter " from London for 
New England, in April, 1635, was Palmer Tinglev, described as 
a " miller," aged twenty-one years, who produced a certificate 
from the minister of Kingston-upon-Thames, that he was no 
subsidy man, and testifying to his conformity. Palmer Tingley 
was in Ipswich, Mass., in 1639 when he received a grant of 
eight acres in reward for service in the war against the Pequod 
Indians in 1637. Beyond this mention on the Ipswich Town 
Records, nothing is known of his career in New England. 
The name does not appear on the probate or land record indexes 
of Essex County, Ipswich series, or old Norfolk County. Suffolk 
files are also silent. 

Wyman, in his " Charlestown Estates and Genealogies " 
makes no mention of the father of Samuel Tingley who was a 
resident in Charlestown in 1663. As he searched Middlesex 
County records most carefully for information regarding Charles- 

*The editor is indebted to Mr. F. M. Saltus for copies of the records of 
Attleboro, Mass., relating to this family. Information relating to this 
family will be welcomed by the editor. 1 

214 









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SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 215 

town residents, It is probable that there is no record extant of the 
birth and paternal parentage of Samuel Tingley. 

Samuel Tingley may have been, and there is no Improbability 
in the supposition, the son of Palmer Tingley. 

The widow, Anna Barrett, of Charlestown, in her will dated 
29th April, proved 20 June, 1681, names her "grand children, 
Samuel and Thomas Tingle," sons of Samuel Tingle or Ting- 
ley, by Elizabeth Call. 

Anna Barrett was the wife of James Barrett. He was 
born about 1615; died 16 Aug., 1672, and was an Inhabitant of 
Charlestown in 1643. '^^^ ^''^^ probably the mother of his 
children, of whom the eldest was born 6 April, 1644. The 
father of Anna Barrett was Stephen Fosdick, an inhabitant 
I of Charlestown in 1635, and a carpenter. He died 21 May, 

1664. He bequeathed ^10 to Hannah Barrett. As his daugh- 
• ' ter Anna or Hannah was aged fifty years in ^665, she would have 
been of marriageable age in 1635, when Palmer Tingley arrived 
in this country, and may have lived with him several years before 
i 1643, the probable date of her marria2;e with Barrett. 

1. Tingley married Anna Fosdick probably between 

1635 and 1640. After his death, date and place unknown, she 
married, second, James Barrett, of Charlestown, and died in 1681, 
leaving children by both husbands. 

Child: — 

2. Samuel, born before 1643; died 28 Dec, 1666. 

2. Samuel Tingle, of Maiden, married 20 Sept., 1663, 
Elizabeth Call, daughter of Thomas and Bennett Call, bapt. 21 
i2mo., 1640-1, at Charlestown. Thomas Call was a tilemaker 
and baker, from Faversham, Kent, in 1636. Thomas Call mar- 
ried, second, Joanna, widow of Daniel Shepardson, and her son 
Daniel, born 1640, married 11 April, 1668, Elizabeth, widow of 
Samuel Tingley {sic^ 

Children : — 

3. Samuel, born Feb., 1665-6. 

4. Thomas, born July, 1667. 



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2i6 SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 

III. 3. Samuel TiNGLEY, of Rehoboth, born Feb., 1665-6, 
at Maiden. 

Children, from Rehoboth records : — 

5. Martha, born 26 Sept., 168 — ; married Joseph Allen. 15 Sept., 1703. 

6. Samuel, born 6 Oct., 1689. 

The record of Mr. Newman's church shows that Samuel 
Tingley was received into the church in 1709. The following 
baptisms are recorded : — V 

Samuel Tingley. 

Elijah, (probably an error of copyist for Elizabeth) of Thomas Tingley. / 

Ephraim. 

Thomas. 

Timothy. 

Esther, apparently all bapt. 17 April, 1709. 

III. Thomas Tingley, born July, 1667, rnarried at Reho- 
both, 14 Aug., 1694, Esther or Hester, daughter of Francis 
Stevens,* of Rehoboth. She died 16 Aug., i 724. Mr. Thomas 
Tingley died 23 Sept., 1724. 

The younger Stevens had Elizabeth, born 15 March, 1663; Francis, born 6 
May, 1664; Mary, born 15 July, 1667; Sarah, born 15 Aug., 1669; Esther, 
born June, 1671; Gilbert, born 26 Feb., 1674. ^^^^ ^^^^ Elizabeth was buried 
six days after the birth of Gilbert. 

Children, from Attleboro records : — 
.7. Elizabeth, born 10 June, 1695. 

8. Timothy, born 3 Oct., 1697. 

9. Ephraim, born 16 tMarch, 1 700. 

10. Thomas, born 6 April, 1703; died 15 June, 1724. ' 

Bristol County Land Records show that Thomas Tingley 
bought of Nathaniel Shepardson a parcel of lands, meadows, and 
swamps lying on both sides of brook in said Attleborough, being 
part of the home lot of Daniel Shepardson and part of it being 



♦Francis Stevens may have been son of Francis Stevens, Sr., of Rehoboth, 
whose inventory was filed, i Jan., 1669-70, and who was one of the original pur- 
chasers of Rehoboth north purchase, afterward Attleboro. 

fVol. II., gives the same record with the exception that Ephraim's birth 
is recorded as of the 24th of March. The name is spelled Tinglec in Vol. H. 
Tingley in Vol. I. 



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ADDENDA. 
NOTES ON THE TINQLEY FAMILY. 

Page 216. Samuel Tingley, No. 3, is said to have had wife 
Martha. He was a carpenter and died at Attleboro about 
1 7 14. His widow married Joseph Allen, of Attleboro. 

Page 219. Hannah Pidge, wife of Samuel Tingley, No. 6, died 
17 April, 1763, a?t. 77. She was daughter of John and Eliz- 
abeth (Newcomb) Pidge, and was born 22 Nov., 1686, at Ded- 
ham. He died 24 June, 1765, ast. 75. Farmer, lived in South 
Attleboro. 

Page 219. Benjamin Tingley, No. 13, died 15 June, 1734. 
Hannah, No. 14, married Elkanah Lane, of Norton, Mass. 
Esther, No. 16, married Dunsmore. 

Page 222. Margaret, wife of Samuel Tingley, No. 11, was 
daughter of Rev. Matthew and Margaret (Freeman) Short, of 
Weymouth, born i Aug., 1717; died 5 Nov., 1808. Samuel 
was a farmer and ship-joiner. He died 15 Oct., 1784, and 
is buried at South Attleboro. Mr. Short was the first settled 
^minister in Attleboro, and was ordained in 1712. 

Page 223. Josiah Tingley, No. 17, removed to Sackville^ N S., 
about I 763. 

The above items are on the authority of Mr. S. H. Tingley 
and Mr. F. A. Lane. 



The records of Waterboro, Me., supply the following addi- 
tional information concerning Rev. Pelatiah Tingley and family : 

Rev. Pelatiah Tingley, of Waterboro, and Mary Murray, of 
I New Durliam, were married 17 Oct., 1787. Rev. Pelatiah 

Tingley died 3 Sept., 1821 ; Mary his wife died May, 1797. 
Children : — 

Rhoda, born 18 Jan., 1789; died 23 Nov., 1831 ; married 
David Burrows 27 Oct., 1804. He died 12 Jan., 1831. 
His son Joseph W. lived in Cleveland, and is today rep- 
resented by his sons who form the book house of Bur- 
rows Bros. 
Pelatiah, born 29 June, 1791 ; died 15 Sept., 1796. 
f Nathaniel Partridge, born 22 April, 1794; died 28 Aug., 

1796. 
Sarah, born 27 Mar., 1796; died 2 July, 1796. 



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SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 



217 



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the two acres allowed him for the highway containing 22 acres 
more or less, bounded southerly by the country road and partly 
on the land of John Comstock, bounded westerly with s^ Tingley 
land and partly with Benj. Day's land, northerly by said Tingley's 
land and Joseph Ingraham's land, easterly the heirs of John 
Shepardson's land, May 8, 171 8. 

Other purchases were made by him on the following dates : — 
May 9, I 718, bought from Daniel Shepardson ; July 19, 17 18, 
bought from Joseph Ingraham ; April 24, 1724, bought from 
Francis Stevens. 

Thomas Tingley was one of the three town officers chosen 11 
May, 1696, and one of the five chosen 22 Mar., 1697. ^^ 
was selectman in 1699. I" each case the name is spelled Tingle. 
He was prominent in town affairs, as selectman, assessor, treas- 
urer, etc., until his death. Administration on his estate was 
granted to his son Timothy 20 Oct., 1724. 



Inventory of Estate of Thomas Tingley, 

A true inventory of all the Real and Personal Estate of Thomas 
Tingley, late of Attleboro, deceased, intestate, taken by us the 
subscribers, the 4th day of November, 1724, being sworn unto 
before George Leanord, Esq.: — 

To his purse, three ounces and quarter of silver 01 : 06: 00 

'* Paper and copper money 05: 18: 09 

*• Wareing apparill 23 : lo: OO 

** His Books 01 : 04: 00 

** Arms and Ammunition . . . . 02 : 13 : oo 

" Beds and Bedding 14: 00: 00 

'* Brass and Pewter 02: lo: 00 

** Iron Potts and Kettles 02: 12: 00 

** Wooden, Glass, and Earthen Ware 02: 00: 00 

*' Chairs, pails, and trays, and tubbs 02: OO: GO 

*' Carpenter and Mason's tools 01: 19: 00 

•* Meat tubs, old casks, and sundries in lumber 02: 10: 00 

" Shoe leather and three calve skins 01 : 06: GO 

" Spinning wheels, clock reel, cardes, and other small things . . 00: 13: 00 

** Sheep's wool and tow and flax not dressed 03: 00: 00 

" Cotton wool, and lining, woolling, and cotton yarn 01 : 08: 00 

*' Cider and casks 07: l8:.00 

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2i8 SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 

To English and Indian corn i6: 17: oo 

' Tobacco 05: 00: 00 

* Flax, not rotted 01 : cx): 00 

' Husbandry tools . . ... . . . 07 : li : 00 

* Nails 13 : 00 : 00 

' Yoke of oxen 13 : 00: 00 

' Five cows v, 2 1 : 05 : 00 

' Six young cattle 13: co: 00 

' Two horses and furniture . .- . ... i3:oo:(X) 

* Twenty-six sheep •. . .... 10: 00: 00 

' Eight swine 27: 10: 00 



Total Personal Property 182: 03: 09 

Real Estate 350 : 00 : 00 

Noah Carpenter, 
John Foster, 
John Fuller. 

Bristol ye January 14, 1724—5. 
Then before the Honorable Nathaniel B. Cagrove, Esq., 
Judge of the Probate of Wills, etc., within the County of Bris- 
toll, came Timothy Tingley, Administrator to the Estate of 
Thomas Tingley, late of Attleboro Deceased, and make oath 
that the inventory contains the whole of that estate the deceased 
died seized of and is come to his knowledge and when he knows 
any more he will reveal ye same yt it may be of record here- 
with. Bristol, ye January ye 28, 1724-5. 

Account of Administrator of Estate of Thomas Tingley. 

October the 21st, 1724: The account of Timothy Tingley, 
administrator to the estate of Thomas Tingley, late of Attleboro, 
deceased, of what debts paid and received, and what sold to pay 
the same ye value of what he sold : — 

The administrator charges himself with the whole of the personal 

Estate, according to inventory . 142: 03:09 

Debts paid that was due from said Estate above mentioned, admr. 
prayes allowencc : — 

To the letter of administration and charges to Bristol 00:12:00 

** Dr. Thomas Bowen 08: 17:00 

** Jeremiah Ingraham GO: 05: 00 

•* Noah Carpenter 00: 05: 03 



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SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 



219 



To James Tilton 00: 03: 00 

* Jos. Brisling, Jr., Oo: 09: 10 

' Mary Leonard 00 : 05: 00 

' Nathaniel Day 00: 12: 00 

* Jonathan Fuller 00:09:00 

' the Adm. of Widow Newell Est 00: 03: 00 

* Benjamin Day 00 : 02 : 00 

* Ephraim Tingley . 01 : 18: 00 

' charges for publishing the Estate 00: 10 : 00 

' myself for money distributed in the time of sickness 04: 00: 09 

* To rates 00: 10: 00 

' John Fuller 00: 05: 06 

* Sam'l Titus and Robt. Foster 00: 06: 06 



20 : 03 : 09 
Paid Elizabeth Tingley, daughter of the Intestate, according to 

agreement and receipt on file 100: 00: CO 

Paid to myself according to agreement and receipts on tile .... 050: 00: 00 

To drawing, allowing, and registering the account 00: 07: 06 

" residue and remaining part of the Personal Estate to myself, 
according to agreement ii: il: 08 



182 : 03 : 09 



Bristol ye Jan. 29, 1724-5. 
• Then before the Hon. Nathaniel B. Cagrove, Esq., Judge of 
the Probate of Wills, etc., within the County of Bristol, came 
Timothy Tmgley, Administrator to the estate of ^Thomas 
Tingley, late of Attleboro, deceased, and presented the above 
written account, and made oath that is a just and true account 
of his administration so far as he haith proceeded therein, and 
when he knowed of any more, he will reveall the same that it 
may be of record herewith. 

IV. 6. Samuel Tingley, probably son of Samuel Tingley, 
of Rehoboth ; married 15 Dec, 17 13, Hannah Pidge. 

Children, born at Attleboro : — 

11. Samuel, born 23 T«ne, 1714. 

12. Daniel, born 21 Feb., 1715-16. 

13. Benjamin, born 19 Nov., 17 18. • 

14. Hannah, born 16 June, 1721. 

15. Martha, born 8 June, 1724. 

16. Esther, born 27 April, 1728. 

17. Josiah, born 3 Dec, 1730. 



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220 SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 

There was a Samuel Tingley who was a selectman, 1741— 
1743- 

IV. 8. Ensign Timothy Tingley, born 3 Oct., 1697; 
married Ruth Pattridge. 

" The ear marks of the creatures belong to Timothy Tingley 
is as follows, viz : A half penny mark under side of each year ; 
the same mark that did belong to his father, Thomas Tingley, 
entered May 3, 1725." Attlehoro Records^ 11.^ p. 182. 

Children, bom in Attlcboro : — 

18. Thomas, born 17 Aug., 1732. 

19. Pelatiah, born 3 Jan., 1734-5. 

20. Rhodah, born 28 Apr., 1737. 

21. Ruth, born 18 Oct., 1739. 

22. Rhoda, born 28 March, 1740. 

23. Timothy, born 20 Dec, 1 741. A Timothy died in 1816, leaving an 

estate of ^7,000. 
2<^. Aremiah, (son) born 4 Oct., 1744. 

25. Cloe, born 25 Nov., 1746; married 8 Feb., 1770, Isaac Draper. 

26. Nathan, born 16 Dec, 1750; died 10 Nov., 1798. 

Ensign Timothy Tingley was selectman, 1728. Capt. Ting- 
ley was selectman, 1744. Timothy Tingley was selectman 
1740, 1744, 1745-50. . „ 

IV. 9. Ephraim Tingley, born 16 Mar., 1700; married 
Elizabeth Birchard. He lived many years in Coventry, R. I. 

Children, from Attleboro records : — 

27. Esther, born 11 Sept., 1731; m. 25 Sept., 1748, William Jencks. 

28. Phebe, born 12 Dec, 1732. 

29. Phillis, born 30 Dec, 1734. 

30. Elizabeth, born 20 Nov., 1 736. 

31. Rebekah, born 4 Feb., 1739-40. 

32. Anna, born 13 Nov., 1741. .. .. - 

33. Sarah, born at Rehoboth, 9 Sept., ; m. Joseph Jencks, grandson 

of Gov. Joseph Jencks, of Rhode Island. 

34. Ephraim, born at Rehoboth, 12 July, 1744-1746? 

Agreement- of Heirs of Thomas Tingley. 

This indenture made this 13th day of Jan., 1725 and in the 
iith year of his majesties Reigne, between Timothy Tingley and 
Ephraim Tingley, Elizabeth Tingley, all of Attleborough in the 



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SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 



221 



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County of Bristole in his majesties province of Massachusetts 
Bay in New England being the only surviving children of Thomas 
Tingley, late of said Attleborough, deceased, and as it haith 
pleased God to bless our honored father with some Real Estate 
in the world, and we, the aforesaid Timothy Tingley and Ephraim 
and Elizabeth being heirs to the said estate desire that brotherly 
love may continue amongst us, do each of us for ourselves and 
each our respective heirs make a full and satisfactory division of 
the estate that our honored father haith left unto us in manner 
and form following: (i.) We the above Ephraim and Elizabeth 
Tingley do by these presents heartily and willingly agree that our 
brother Timothy Tingley shall have for his part out of our 
father's estate, viz : i8 ^ acres of land, be it more or less, 
situated in Attleborough aforesaid all the northwardly end of a 
certain hill called Readston hill and likewise another tract of land 
situate in Attleborough aforesaid containing 31^ acres lying west 
of Jeremiah Ingraham's house, and to highway east; 

To have and to hold the aforesaid two tracts of land with all 
the rightes, profits and privileges to the same belonging or any 
ways appertaining to him the said Timothy Tingley his heirs and 
assigns forever. To his and their only proper use and benefit 
forever — bound more particularly as may appear by Record, pref- 
erence thereunto being had, and likewise one half of the com- 
mon rights belong to said estate. 

To have and to hold the said 50 pounds worth of personal 
estate to him the said Timothy Tingley, his heirs and assigns 
forever. We the above said Timothy and Elizabeth Tingley do 
by these presents heartily agree that our said brother Ephraim shall 
have the house lot or home lot together with a certain lot of land 
adjoining which our honored father purchased of Nathaniel Shep- 
ardson situate in said Attleborough aforesaid containing by esti- 
mation 40 acres in the whole, be the same more or less, together 
with j4 part of the common right due to the said estate together 
with the rights, profits, privileges, and appurtenances to the same 
belonging any way appertaining unto him the said Ephraim Ting- 



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222 SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 

ley, his heirs and assigns forever, and in consideration whereof 
our said brother had paid unto us the said Timothy and Elizabeth 
Tingley 50 pounds in money to each of ms. 

We the aforesaid Timothy and Ephraim Tingley do by these 
presents heartily that our sister Elizabeth shall have 100 pounds 
in personal estate as it was prized as may appear by the inven- 
tory taken of said estate with all the appurtenances to the same 
belonging in any manner of way appertaining unto her the said 
Elizabeth Tingley her heir and assigns forever. And further we 
the said Ephraim and Elizabeth Tingley do by these presents 
heartily agree that our said brother Timothy shall have all the 
remaining part of the personal estate together with all the debts 
due to the said estate, to enable him as he is administrator to pay 
all the just debts due from said estate in witness whereof we the 
said Timothy Tingley, Ephraim Tingley, and Elizabeth Tingley 
have hereunto set our hands and seals the day and year above 
written. 

Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of us Jacob 

Stanley, John Foster. 

Timothy Tingley, 

Ephraim Tingley, 

Elizabeth Tingley. 

Bristoll, ye January ye 19th, 1724-5. 

V. II. Samuel Tingley, born 23 June, 17 14; married 
Margaret Short. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 

35. Martha, born lO Jan., 1 737. 

36. Margaret, born 20 Feb., 1738. 

37. Benjamin, born 13 April, 1741. 

38. Lowes, born 7 Nov., 1742. 

39. Daughter, born i8 Aug., 1744. 

40. Sarah, born 13 June, 1746. 

41. Mary, born 25 Aug., . 



42. Eunice, born 10 March, 

43. Samuel, born 17 Oct., — 

44. Betty, born 8 Oct., 



45. Marcy, born 12 Dec, ; died 15 Aug., 

46. Lydia, born 6 May, . 



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SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 223 

V. 17. JosiAH TiNGLEY, bom 3 Dcc, 1730; married 

Jemima Crabtree. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 
Josiah, born 9 Dec, 1760. 
Levinia, born 20 Oct., 1762. 

V. 18. Thomas Tingley, born 17 August, 1732 ; married 
28 Nov., 1754, Martha, daughter of Benjamin Day, of Attleboro. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 
Rhoda, born 17 Aug., 1755. 
Lucy, born i May, 1758. • - 

Elkanah, born 26 March, 1760. 
Melatiah, born 5 Oct., 1762. 
Ruth, born 7 Jan., 1765. 
Patte, born 11 March, 1767. 
Thomas, born 17 July, 1769. 

V. 19. Rev. Pelatiah Tingley, A. M., born at Attle- 

^Q^O) 3 J^^'t 1734-5 ; ^ied at Waterborough, Me., 3 Sept., 

1821 ; married iMary , who died May, 1797, 
aet. 51. 

Child: — ^ 

Rhoda; married David Burrows, of Waterborough, Maine. 

- Rev. Pelatiah Tingley graduated from Yale in 1761, and 
received his A. M., In 1765. He was licensed to preach in 
1762 by the New Haven East Association, and in 1764 was 
preaching in the West Parish of Haverhill. He became asso- 
ciated with Elder Hezekiah Smith, a noted preacher among the 
Baptists, and in 1765 refused an invitation to settle at Gorham, 
Me. Shortly after this he became a member of the Baptist 
church at Haverhill, but was refused a license to preach in 1767, 
though not prohibited from the pulpit, and in 1768 represented 
the Baptist church at Weare when that church joined the War- 
ren, R. I., Association. In 1771 he was "warned " from San- 
ford, but the following year, on i6th Sept., was ordained to the 
work of an elder over the Baptist church of that place. His 
work was largely that of a missionary, and he baptized at Leb- 
anon, Gilmanton, and Barnstead, N. H., between 1773 and 






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224 SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 

1780. In the latter year he joined the Aminian faction and 
was the first minister to unite with Elder Benjamin Randall, the 
founder of the Free- Will Baptists, and was exceedingly active in 
establishing churches in the towns on the Kennebec and to the 
south. In 1790 he was living in Waterborough, which place he 
represented in 1788 at the Massachusetts convention which 
ratified the Constitution of the United States, voting "• nay " on 
the question of ratification. In 1799 was one of a committee 
to conduct the first Free-Will Baptist ordination in Vermont, 
where he also labored in 1801. His life was one of hard mis- 
sionary labor in which he often met with opposition. 

His grave is on the Burrows farm at Waterborough, and the 
stone reads : — 

Rev. Pelatiah Tingley, died Sept. 3, 1821, aged 83. Mary, his 
wife, died May, 1797, aged 51. 

He was reserved in speech, quickwitted, fearless, modest, and 
much beloved by his people who gave him the title of " Father." 
His sermons and prayers were short and to the point. For 
many years he served the association to which his church belonged 
as clerk, and sometimes as moderator. See history of Sanford, 
Maine, for further details, also Baptist publications. 

V. 24. Arennah Tingley^ born 4 Oct., 1744; married 
16 Jan., 1766, Kezeiah Pitcher. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 
•Cynthia, born 22 May, 1 766. ' 

Timothy, born 10 April, 1768. 

Chloe, born i March, 1770; married 25 June, 1789, Samuel Titus. 
Cylinda, born 16 March, 1772; married 24 May, 1792, William Read. 
Otis, born 16 April, 1774. 

On 6 Dec, 1774, Benjamin and Arannah Tingley were 
selected as two of a committee of seven to inspect, enquire, and 
give notice of all persons who shall presume to make use of any 
India tea after the first of March next. (^Attleboro Records.) 

V. 26. Nathan Tingley, born 16 Dec, 1750, died 10 
Nov., 1798; married at Rehoboth, 11 Jan., 1773, Lucy, daugh- 



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SOME NOTES ON THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 225 

ter of Benijah Barrows or Barrus. She was born i June, 1754. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 
Lucy, born 9 April, 1774. 

Arrannah, born 23 Oct., 1775. " ■ * 

Betty, born 29 April, 1777. 
Polly, born 7 Dec, 1779. 
Waitea, born 19 Sept., 1782. 
Nathan, born 19 Sept., 1784. • . - 

VI. 37 .? Benjamin Tingley, married Sibllah Fuller. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 
Frileen, born 21 Jan., 1765. 
Sabrina, born 10 Feb., 1767. 

Reuphes (Rufus), born 29 Jan., 1769; died 29 Aug., 1780. 
Mary, born 9 Sept., 177 1. 
Ann, born 20 Sept., 1773. 
Benjamin, born 28 Feb., 1776. 
Sarah, born 19 April, 1778. 
Sibulah, born 31 Jan., 1780; died 10 Sept., 1780. 

VI. Thomas Tingley, Jr., (son. of 18.'') died 18 Oct., 
1809 ; married Elizabeth Fuller. He married, second, 27 Jan., 
1799, Betsy Ingraham, who died 17 Aug., 18 13. 

Child, Attleboro records: — 

Eliza, born 8 Aug., 1793. 
Children, by second marriage: — 

Edwin, born 14 Sept., 1803. 

Otis, born 13 April, 1803. 

Eliza Ingraham, born 8 May, 1809. 

Thomas Augustus, born 27 July, 1813; died i Aug., 1814. 

Timothy Tingley, married Abigail Capron who died 9 July, 
1807. 

Children, from Attleboro records: — 
Arenna, born 21 Sept., 1792. 
Timothy, born 21 May, 1796. 
Eliza, born 23 June, 1798. 
Abigail Capron, born 23 April, 1807. 



Miscellaneous. 
From Attleboro Records: — 
Thomas Whitherton and Lydia Tingley, married 28 Oct., 1790; both of 

Attleboro. 
Samuel Tingley and Aimy Vial, married 5 July, 1797. 






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226 SOME NOTES QN THE TINGLEY FAMILY. 

From Cumberland, R. I., records: — * 

Thadeus Cook married Hannah Tingley, 4 April, 175 1. 

Samuel Tingley, of Attleboro, married Jemima Streeter, of Cumberland, 11 
Dec, 1764. 

Benjamin Tingley, of Attleboro, married Elizabeth Philbrook, widow, and 
daughter of John Cole, 10 Nov., i78c. 

From Rehoboth records: — 

John Brown married Anna Tingley, 18 June, 1772. 
In the Revolution from Attleboro : — ' 

1775. Benj. Tingley. 

Nathan Tingley. 
Samuel Tingley. 

Called out 5 Jan., 1776, and marched 35 miles: — 
Sergt. Benj. Tingley, (made Lt. 21 Apr., 1777). 
Nathan Tingley. 
Arunah Tingley. 

Members of the West Company, War of 1812 : — 
Samuel Tingley. 
Sylvanus Tingley. 



QUERIE5. 

Metcalf. — What was the maiden name of the wife of 
Jeremiah Metcalf, a revolutionary soldier ? He was born in 
Wrentham, Mass., mustered into the service April 27, 1775, 
(aged 34) in Suffolk County,- died a prisoner of war in the " Old 
Sugar House," New York, in 1780. 

Phelps. — What was the maiden name of the mother of 
Robert Phelps, Jr., of Lancaster, Mass., who was wounded in 
battle of Bunker Hill, and died a prisoner of war in Boston, in 
August of same year .'' ^ C. M. M. 



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BOOK NOTES. 



Authors and publishers are requested to direct books sent for notice, to 
the Editor, 49 North Prospect St., Burlington, Vermont. The space for a 
brief notice of any worthy publication is gladly given, as there is no doubt 
that in this manner many special publications are brought to the attention of 
purchasers. Publishers arc requested to state the price of publication. 

Archives of Maryland ; Muster Rolls and Other 
records of service of Maryland troops in the American Revolu- 
tion, 1775-1783. Published by authority of the State, under 
the direction of the Maryland Historical Society. Baltimore, 
1900. 4V0., pp. 736. 

This is a useful volume, especially to students of Southern 
genealogy. The well known reputation for bravery sustained 
by the Maryland soldier is a source of pride to his descendants, 
and this roll of more than ten thousand names is a fit monument 
to Maryland's part in the great struggle for freedom. The editor 
has wisely adopted the method used by the State of Connecticut, 
rather than that adopted by the State of Massachusetts, thus pre- 
senting rolls and other papers practically entire. The materials 
for this volume were obtained chiefly from the library of Johns 
Hopkins University, the Maryland Land Office, and from papers 
in possession of the Maryland Historical Society. It is a matter 
of regret that the rolls of the two companies which hastened to 
Boston at the outbreak of hostilities, are lost. The records of 

the " Maryland line " are, however, quite complete. The lists 
of the little Maryland navy, and rolls of escaped and exchanged 

prisoners and other miscellaneous papers are incorporated in this 

volume. Maryland supplied four of the eight companies com- 

227 



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228 BOOK NOTES. 

prising the " German Regiment " raised for continental service 
in 1776, divided betvi^een Frederick and Baltimore counties. 
The other four companies came from Pennsylvania. 

A Genealogy of the Family of Lt. Samuel Benjamin, 
and Tabitha Livermore, his wife, Early Settlers of Livermore, 
Me., with a Record of their Descent from John Benjamin and 
John Livermore, etc. By Mary L. Benjamin. 1900. 8vo., 
pp. 112. Price, $5. 

John Benjamin, ancestry unknown, was born about 1598, 
and married in 16 19 Abigail, daughter of Rev. William Eddy, of 
Cranbrook, England. He came to New England in 1632, with 
his brother Richard. Richard was first of Watertown but in 
1663 r^'i^^vcd to Southold, L. I. John settled in Cambridge 
and is styled " Mr.," an indication of his standing in the com- 
munity, but removed to Watertown about 1637, where he died 
14 June, 1645. His eldest son, John, married Lydia, daughter 
of William Allen, and had, among others, Abel, born 20 May, 
1668, who married Abigail, and died in 17 20, leaving children, 
among them Jonathan. Jonathan married, 17 20, Susanna 
Norcross ; his son Abel was born in Watertown, 15 Sept., 1731, 
married, 1752, Elizabeth Nutting, and died in the colony service 
23 Sept., 1758, leaving Samuel, whose history and descendants 
are given by Miss Benjamin. 

History of Stonington, Conn., 1649-1900, with a 
Genealogical Register. By Richard A. Wheeler. 8vo., pp. 754. 
New London, 1900. 

The author of this volume devoted years to the collection of 
genealogical and historical material relating to southeastern 
Connecticut, which was always at the disposal of other students. 
That the entire edition of the book, for which this material was 
gathered, has been disposed of so soon after publication is most 
encouraging as it shows that well planned and carefully com- 
piled town histories are eagerly sought for. 

Stonington was embraced within the patent granted in 1 631 
to Lords Say and Seal, Brook, and others, but the colony of 



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BOOK NOTES. . 229 

Massachusetts having a right, acquired by conquest of the Pequot 
Indians in 1637, determined to possess the territory. John 
Winthrop, Jr., located at Pequot (New London) in 1645 ^"^ ^^ 
1646 the Commissioners for the United Colonies, to whom the 
question was referred, decided that his plantation was within the 
bounds of Connecticut. William Chesebrough, however, 
settled in 1649 beyond the limits of any township, in what he 
claimed was within the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. He was 
the first settler in what is now Stonington and was permitted to 
remain, receiving, in 1652, a confirmation from New London of 
the land he had taken up, though without the limits of that 
township. He was soon joined by Thomas Stanton, Walter 
Palmer, and others, who, being refused incorporation by Connec- 
ticut, boldly resolved to petition for a charter from Massachu- 
setts under the old claim. This led to a friendly demand by the 
latter colony on Connecticut to yield her jurisdiction. The 
plantation was then called Mystic or Poquatuck and in 1658 its 
inhabitants entered into an association for mutual protection, and 
chose Capt. George Denison and William Chesebrough as 
commissioners. That same year the Commissioners of the 
United Colonies rendered a decision that all the Pequot territory 
to the east of the Mystic River, including Stonington, belonged 
to Massachusetts. That colony proceeded to organize the town 
of Southertown as a part of Suffx>lk County. In 1662 the new 
charter for Connecticut extended her bounds to include a large part 
of the town, and Massachusetts yielded to this higher authority. 

In 1665 the name of Southertown was changed to Mystic, 
and the following year to Stonington. 

In 1668 there were forty-three heads of families who were 
legally inhabitants of the town. 

Mr. Wheeler gives the documents illustrating this early con- 
flict of jurisdictions, and continues the history of the town and 
its institutions to the present time. A sketch of the Pequot 
Indians is included. 

The greater part of the book is devoted to genealogical rec- 






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330 . BOOK NOTES. 

ords, covering all the early and prominent families identified 
with the town. 

The Downers of America, with Genealogical Record. 
By David R. Downer. Newark, N. J., 1900. 8vo., pp. 344, 
illustrated. 

The title is a truthful description of the book, which shows 
care and labor. - 

The first of the name in New England was Robert of New- 
bury about 1650. His descendants are largely in New England, 
New York, and the West. There was also a Moses Downer in 
Newbury, who died in Hampton in 1699, who left descendants. 

The ancestry of John Downer, of Pownal, Vt., has not been 
discovered. He was born about 1744, and died in 1805. He 
is said to have settled in Pownal about 1763, coming from 
Schenectady, N. Y. His descendants are chiefly in New York, 
Wisconsin, and neighboring states. 

Another family of Downers descends from Rev. Arthur 
Downer, of Downer, N. J., born in 1829 at Killeshandra, 
Cavan, Ireland. Another Irish family of the name is descended 
from John Downer or Downey, of Rosgrea, who settled in New- 
bury about 1849. They claim a Scottish ancestry. There are 
also distinct families of late migration in Pennsylvania, California, 
and Massachusetts. 

The Jamaica, W. I., family descends from William Downer, 
a " Loyalist," from Long Island, whose ancestry is unknown. 

A Partial Record of the Mansur Family. By John H. 
Mansur. Burlington, Vt., 1901. 8vo., pp. 59. 

This is a reprint from The Genealogical Quarterly 
Magazine, intended for private distribution in the hope of 
awakening interest among members of the family. A larger 
and more complete work may be expected at some later day. 
The edition is small. 

\ An Index to Taintor's Colchester, Conn., Records, 
with all genealogical matter alphabetically arranged for easy 



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BOOK NOTES. 231 

reference. Compiled by James K. Blish, Kewanee, 111. Price, 

50 cents. 

A most useful pamphlet, as every one who has had occasion 
to refer to the Colchester records, as printed by Mr. Taintor, 
will appreciate. In addition to the alphabetical arrangement 
Mr. Blish has added an index. 

A History of the Putnam Family in England and 
America. Part VIII. By Eben Putnam. New York : The 
Knickerbocker Press, 1901. 8vo., pp. 100, illustrated. 

This part completes the number of pages (600) which it was 
originally estimated would contain the complete history. The 
author's investigations in England resulted in so large an accumu- 
lation of valuable material that an entire part was needed to pre- 
sent the necessary outline of the history of the family prior to 
the migration. In addition to this unlooked-for material the 
interest awakened among little known and widely scattered 
branches of the family resulted in the collection of material giv- 
ing the history of many lines hitherto unknown. In consequence. 
Part VIII., instead of completing the family record, contains only 
the families of the tribe of Thomas in the seventh generation. 
It is estimated that to finish the work as contemplated more than 
nine hundred pages will be required, making a total of fifteen 
hundred pages. Provided a sufficient number of original sub- 
scribers will agree to increase their subscription to make a total 
of fifteen dollars for the complete work, payable at a propor- 
tionate rate for each part issued, the well known publishing house 
of G. P. Putnam's Sons will publish the remainder of the work. 
Most of the original subscriptions were at six dollars, but for 
some time volume I., comprising seven parts, has commanded 
the price of fifteen dollars. 

Genealogical Gleanings in England, by Henry F. Wat- 
ers. 2 vols., pp. 1043. ^^^ New England Historic Genealogi- 
cal Society. Boston, 1901. 

During nearly twenty years the New England Historic Genea- 
logical Society has published quarterly installments of Mr. Wat- 



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332 BOOK NOTES. 

ers' English Gleanings which without question have proved to be, 
with the one exception of Savage's Genealogical Dictionary ot 
New England, the greatest genealogical work performed. These 
two volumes are reprints of what has appeared in the Register 
during the period from July, 1883, to January, 1899, which 
embraced such valuable historical discoveries as the finding of the 
Winthrop Map and of the Maverick MS., which are justly 
described as two of the most important contributions made of 
late years to our early colonial history. 

Of the several thousand wills relating to American families, 
unearthed by Mr. Waters, the discovery of the group of wills 
supplying the necessary information to establish the ancestry of 
George Washington, John Harvard, Roger Williams, and John 
Rogers attracted universal attention, and served to prove to the 
public the great value of genealogical research conducted in a 
scientific manner. 

The pedigree opposite page 396, showing the ancestry of 
Washington, should be corrected, on the authority of Mr. 
Waters, to erase the name Rhoades as the possible name of 
Amphillis, wife of Lawrence Washington, the father of the emi- 
grants to Virginia. 

The volumes are thoroughly indexed, and, issued in this form, 
will prove extremely valuable. In Volume XVII. of the Essex 
Institute Historical Collections, published in 1880, will be found 
the first contribution of Mr. Waters in the line of English 
research, and in the same Collections, Vol. XXVIII, , extracts 
from the Marriage Licenses granted by the Bishop of London, 
1598—1639. These three contributions to our early history and 
genealogy should be in every public library in the country. 






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A PARTIAL RECORD OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND HAR- 

RIAQE5, FROn TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS, LEBA= 

NON, N. H., VOL. I., FROn 1765 TO 1789. 



Copied by Byron N. Clark. 



John Wheatley, died Jul}' 30, 1786, aged 67. 
Major Elisha Lathrop, died July 2, 1787, aged 71, "being 
killed by the fall of a tree." 

Benjamin Fuller, died Sept. 8, 1790, aged 79. 
Abigail Fuller, wife of Benjamin Fuller, Jr., died Aug. 15, 
1790. 

Rufus, son of Rufus and Eunice Baldwin, born June 27, 
1760. . , 

Samuel, born Nov. 8, 1762. 

Eunice, born May 14, 1766. 

Uriah, born^-Oct. 9, 1768 ; died Nov. 23, 1768. 

Eleazer, born Oct. 21, 1770. 

Lucy, born July 11, 1776. 
Lucy, wife of John Baldwin, died Jan. 2, 1777. 
John Baldwin, died Dec. 7, 1778. 
Eunice, wife of Rufus Baldwin, died Aug. 13, 1778. 
Nathaniel Bosworth, son of Nathaniel and Mary Bosworth, 
born March 7, 1782. 

Lucv, born Aug. 20, 1783. 

Nabby, born March 15, 1785. 

Jonathan, born Jan. 21, 1787. 

George, born Jan. 21, 1789. 

233 



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434 LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

Dec. 3, 1772. Phineas Right and Zilpher Downer married. 

June 20, 1773. Hobard Estabrook and Hannah Paddleford, 
both of Lebanon, married. 

Oct. 25, 1775. Simon Peter Slapp and Lucretia Wilson 
hiarried. 

Dec. I, 1778. Rufus Baldwin and Miriam Closson mar- 
Hed. 

Nov. 24, 1778. William Downer and Anna Wilson mar- 

Hed. 

Jan. I, 1788. Nehemiah Fox and Sarah Bailey, both of 
Lebanon, married by Elihu Hyde. 

Oct. 8, 1787. Ichabod Church and Hannah Palmer, both of 
Lebanon, married. 

Asa, son of Ichabod and Hannah Church, born Sept. 4, 1788. 
' ; Electa, daughter of Nehemiah and Sarah Fox, born Sept. 15, 

1788. 

April 20, 1789. Jeremiah Bryant and Lucy Meads married. 

Feb. 3, 1789. Zuar Eldridge, of Lebanon, and Polly Brown, 
of Chester, married. 

Elisha, son of Zuar and Polly Eldridge, born Jan. 9, 1790. 

Sarah, daughter of Joseph, Jr., and ^Sarah Wood, born Aug. 

1^, 1784. 

Martha, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Wood, born June 16, 

1786. 

Joseph, son of Joseph and Sarah Wood, born April 20, 1788. 
Polly, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Wood, born Aug. 16, 

1789. 

Ephraim, son of Ephraim and Hannah Brown, born Dec. 15, 

1787- 

Feb. 24, 1790. Oliver Smith, Jr., and Elizabeth Martin, 
both of Lebanon, married by Rev. Isaiah Potter. 

July 15, 1790. Leland Colburn, of Hartford, and Abigail 
Stephens married. 

Sept. I, 1790. Amasa Watkins and Lucy Wright married. 

Sept. 23, 1790. Thomas Waterman and Suza Cleveland, of 
Canterbury, Conn., married by Rev. Isaiah Potter. 



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LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 235 

Roger, son of Jedediah Hibbard, born Aug. 13, 1764,31 
Canterbury, Conn. 

Martha, daughter of Jedediah Hibbard, born July 12, 1766. 

Thomas, son of Silas Waterman, born July 11, 1766. 

Anna, daughter of Oliver Daveson, born June 4, 1765. 

Tryphena Daveson, born March 11, 1767. 

Mary, daughter of Jonathan Dana, born May 11, 1766. 

Lois, daughter of Jedediah Hebbard, born Aug. 3, 1768. 

Martha, daughter of Levi Hyde, born Aug. 10, 1767. 

Mary, daughter of Silas Waterman, born Jan. 3, 1769. 

Abigail, daughter of Samuel Estabrook, born June 26, 1767 ; 
died July 9, 1767. 

Bethiah, daughter of Samuel Estabrook, born Sept. 2, 1768. 

Sarah, daughter of James Jones, born Dec. 22, 1764. 

Iranah Jones, born Nov. i, 1766. 

Easter Jones, born Dec. 9, 1768. 

James, Jr., son of James Hartshorn, born Nov. 29, 1767. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Martin, born Oct. 20, 1767. 

Jemima, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Martin, born Dec. 

Jonathan, born June 26, 1774. 

John, born June 15, 1776. 

Joseph, born May 16, 1778. 

Sylvanus, born May 8, 1781. . » 

John, son of Joseph Wood, born July 27, 1763. 
Samuel Porter, son of Jedediah Hebbard, born July 27, 1770. 
Storrs, son of Nathaniel Hall, born Jan. 5, 1770. 
Giles, son of Jese Cook, born Dec. 27, 1770. 
William, Jr., son of William Dana, born Oct. 28, 177 1. 
Dan, son of Nathaniel Hall, born April 26, 1771. 
Elisha, son of James Hartshorn, born Dec. 17, 1769. 
Bethiah, daughter of James Hartshorn, born Feb. i, 1772. 
Jerusha, daughter of Hucken Storrs, born Jan. 6, 1760. 

Eunice, born Sept. 16, 1761. 

Hucken, Jr., born April 3, 1763. 

Hanah, born Feb. 16, 1765. 



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236 LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

Abigail, born June 19, 1767. 
Hyram, born Aug. 21, 1769. 
Moley, born Nov. i, 1771. 

John, son of Benjamin Fuller, Jr., born March 27, 177 1. 

Eunice, daughter of Jedediah Hebbard, born June 14, 1772. 

Alfrad, son of Elisha Bingham, born Jan. 30, 177 1. 

Elias, son of Elisha Bingham, born Aug. 29, 1772. 

Daniel, son of Nehemiah Estabrook, born June 19, 1772. 

Anna, daughter of Bela Turner, born April 2, 1769. 

Lydia, daughter of Bela Turner, born Aug. 3, 1771. 

Daniel, son of Nehemiah Estabrook, died Feb. 7, 1774. 

Lucy, daughter of Bela Turner, born Oct. 3, 1773. 

John Baldwin, Jr., died Mav 4, 1773. 

Bela, son of Elisha Bingham, born March 7, 1774. 

Jahleel, son of Abiel Willes, born Sept. 12, 1774. .; 

Silas, son of Silas Waterman, born Sept. 7, 1774. "" 

Ira, son of Nathaniel Hall, born Dec. 10, 1773. 
' Orla, son of Nathaniel Hall, born Sept. 21, 1774. 

Rebekah, daughter of Samuel Estabrook, born Feb. 8, 1775. . 

Jedidiah, son of Jedidiah Hebbard, born Feb. 24, 'i 775. 

James, son of James Jones, born Dec. i^, 1774. 

Constant, son of Nathaniel Storrs, born April i, 1772. 

Nathaniel, son of Nathaniel Storrs, born March .14, 1774. 

Hannah, daughter of Levi Hyde, born Sept. 3, 1769; died 
Jan. 29, 1774. 

Martha, died Jan. 30, 1774. 
Anna, born July 8, 1772. 
Martha, born Dec. 3, 1774. 

•Clara, daughter of Bela Turner, born July 28, 1775. 

Jeremiah, son of Jeremiah Griswold, born April 18, 1775; 
died Sept. 21, 1779. 

Nathaniel, son of Jedediah Hebbard, born Feb. 24, 1777. 

Dan, son of Abiel Willes, born Sept. 19, 1776. 

Submitt, daughter of Jno. and Submitt Wheatley, died Mav 
23, 1777, "iu the I3rh year of her age with the Canker or throat 
Distemper.'* 



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LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 237 

Jesse, son of Jesse Cook, born Jan. 27, 1773. 
Giles, son of Jesse Cook, born May 29, 1775. 
Lucy, daughter of Nathaniel Wheatley, born Feb. 20, 1 777. 
John, son of John Gray, born Feb. 10, 1771 ; died Feb. 19, 
1771. 

Molly, born Feb. 5, 1772; died July — , 1777. 

Susanna, born Dec. 6, 1774. 

David, born April 24, 1776. 

Samuel, born May 27, 1782. 

Molly, born Feb. 12, 1785. 
Luther, son of Jesse Cook, born April 14, 1777; died Oct. 

14, 1777- 

John, son of Benjamin Fuller, Jr., died Sept. 17, 1777, aged 

I- 

Luther Wheatley, mortally wounded Sept. 19, 1777 in a bat- 
tle near Stillwater, died Sept 30, 1777, aged 17. 

Ezra Jones, son of Doctor John Williams, born Feb. 10, 

1778.- 

Jesse, son of Nathaniel Storrs, born March 10, 1776. 
Ruth, daughter of Nathaniel Storrs, born Aug. 7, 1778. 
Roger, son of Abiel Willes, born Sept. 30, 1778. 
Dan, son of Abiel Willes, died Oct. 15, 1778. 
Eunice, daughter of Abiel Willes, born March 12, 1788. 
Oliver, son of Jeremiah Griswold, born June 24, 1777. 
John, son of John Gray, born Sept. 16, 1778. 
Submitt, daughter of Nathaniel Wheatley, born March 7, 
1779. 

Fanney, daughter of Jesse Cook, born March 3, 1779- 
Anne, daughter of Samuel P^stabrook, born May 25, 1770. 

Rodolphus, born Nov. 17, 1772. 

Samuel, born April 8, 1774. 

Zerniah, born May 16, 1777. 

Eunice, born March 13, 1779. 
Abigail, daughter of Jeremiah Griswold, born Oct. 2, 1779. 
Jeremiah, son of Jeremiah Griswold, born Dec. 18, 178 1. 
Hannah, daughter of Levi Hyde, born Nov. 19, 1776. 



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238 LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

Persus, daughter of P. L. Hyde, born April 26, 1779. 
Jehiel, son of James Jones, born Oct. 9, 1780. 
Amos, son of James Jones, born May 24, 1784. 
Jasper, son of James Jones, born Oct. 11, 1785. 
Polly, daughter of Jedediah Hebbard, born Nov. 19, 1781. 
Bela, born Feb. 19, 1774. 
Silas, born Sept. 5, 1776. 
James, born Jan. 13, 1779. 

Lucius, born March 14, 1781 ; died Feb. 4, 1783. 
Submit, born April 10, 1784. 
Lydia, born Oct. 4, 1786. 
Nov. 15, 1774. Rev. Isaiah Potter and Betsey Barrett mar- 
ried. Their children were : — 

Barrett, born May 8, 1776. • 

Daniel, born June 8, 1778 ; died Sept. 16, 1779. 
Betsey, born March 25, 1781. 
Wealthy, daughter of Joel Kilburn, born April 25, 1781. 
Olive, daughter of John and Rebaca Chenney,born Feb. 4, 1782. 
Nathaniel, son of Jedidiah Hebbard, born Dec. 4, 1784. 
Asel, son of Azariah Bliss, Jr., born June 16, 1773. 
Lemuel, born Sept. 12, 1775. 

Rachel, born Dec. 28, 1777; died Sept. 23, 1779. 
Rachel, born Oct. 10, 1780. 
Dan, born Nov. 4, 1784. 
Joannah, daughter of William Dana, born Oct. 15, 1773. 
Simeon, born Nov. 30, 1775. 
Betsey, born June 6, 1778. 
Jedidiah, born July 15, 1780. 
Lucy, daughter of Phineas Wright, born Nov. 27, 1777. 
Charlotte, daughter of Phineas Wright, born Nov. 5, 17 81. 
George, son of William and Experience Downer, born June 
27, 1771. 

Martha, daughter of William and Experience Downer, born 
June I, 1774. 

Experience, daughter of William and Experience Downer, 
born Sept. 8, 1776. 






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LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 239 

William Downer, died Dec. 27, 1784, aged 55. 

Fanny, daughter of William Downer, Jr.,' born April 7, 1780. 
Infannah, born Dec. 8, 1781. 
Sareptia, born April 7, 1784. 
Sareptia, born Jan. 29, 1787. ^ 

Susanna, born Feb. 2, 1789. 

Ziba, son of Zenas Alden, born Sept. 16, 1781. 

Clarissa, daughter of Abiel Willes, born July 28, 1782. 

Erasmus, son of Sherebiah Ballard, born June 11, 1782. 

Dan, son of Abiel Willes, born July 14, 1780^ died April 
26, 1783. 

Lucy, daughter of Abiel Willes, born July 28, 1784. 

Wade, son of Daniel Hough, born Oct. 3,1781. 
Philura, born Feb. 10, 1785. 
Richard, born Sept. 25, 1784. 
Clark, born May 2, 1786. 

Oct. 24, 1784. Publication of marriage intentions of Aaron 
Hutchinson and Eunice Bailev, both of Lebanon. 

Henry, son of Aaron Hutchinson, born March 30, 1785. 

James, son of Aaron Hutchinson, born Dec. 2, 1786. 

Aug. 10, 1788. Publication of marriage intentions of Robert 
Otis , of Lebanon, and Polly Purmot, of Enfield. 

Charlotte, daughter of Daniel Sweetland, born Dec. 27, 
1789. 

Aurelia, daughter of Daniel Sweetland, born April 25, 1787. 

Bliss, son of Daniel Blodget, born Dec. 9, 1784. 

Daniel, son of Daniel Blodget, born Sept. 29, 1786. 

Luther, son of John Colburn, Jr., born May 29, 1786. 

Betsey, daughter of Daniel Bliss, born Feb. 10, 1784. 

Daniel, son of Daniel Bliss, born May 10, 1786. 

Nov. 23, 1788. Publication of marriage intentions of Zuar 
Eldridge, of Lebanon, and Polly Brown, of Chester. 

Jan. 5, 1789. Publication of marriage intentions of John 
Ticknor, of Lebanon, and Mabel Green, of Plainfield. 

March 8, 1789. Publication of marriage intentions of Jere- 
miah Bryant and Lucy Meeds, both of Lebanon. 



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a40 ^ LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

Hannah, daughter of John Griswold, born Oct. 6, 1761. 

Lydia, born May 11, 1763. 

John, born Feb. 24, 1765. 

Jedidlah, born April i, 1767. 

Benjamin, born May 29, 1769. 
Ruth, wife of John Griswold, died Oct. 30, 17 70. 
Dec. 4, 1 77 1. John Griswold and Elizabeth Porter married. 
Charlotte, daughter of John Griswold, born Nov. 27, 1772. 

Hewitt, born May 10, 1774. 

Joseph, born Aug. 2, 1776. 

Ahira, born Feb. 13, 1778. 

Elizabeth, born May 27, 1780. 

Eve, born April 26, 1784. 
Bcla, son of James Jones, born Dec. 17, 1788. 
Joel, son of James and Lucy Jones, born Aug. 3, 1790. 
Sept. 16, 1 783. Samuel Huntington and Mary Bennit married. 
Poliy, daughter of Samuel Huntington, born Sept. 22, 1784. 
Hannah, daughter of Capt. Israel Convers, born April 8, 

1785. 

Hannah, daughter of Zalmon Aspinwall, born April 1, 1785. 
Augusta, daughter of Zalmon Aspinwall, born Dec. 31, 1786. 
SufFrona, daughter of Zalmon Aspinwall, born Jan. 26, 1789. 
Samuel Guild, son of John Martin, born July 9, 1778. 
Levi, son of John Martin, born June 6, 1780. 
Diantha, daughter of John Martm, born Sept. 14, 1781. 
Dec. 26, 1782. John Martin and Eunice Rockwell married. 
Alice, daughter of John and Eunice Martin, born Jan. 5, 
1787; died Sept. 11, 1788. 

Dan, son of John and Eunice Martin, born July 20, 1788. 
Elijah, son of Elijah Dewey, born Dec. 22, 1752. 

Jerusha, born Jan. 19, 1755. 

Martin, born Nov. i, 1756. 

Saxton, born Dec. 25, 1759. . • 

Hannah, born Oct. 10, 1762. 

Jemima, born Alay 12, 1766. 

William, born March 4, 1769. 












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LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 241 

July 31, 1783. James Jones and Lucy Thomas married. 
Nov. 6, 1783. David Crocker and Sarah Jones married. 
Charles, born Sept. 8, 1786. 
Jesse, born May 19, 1788. 
Candace, born Dec. 20, 1789. 
Sept. 20, 1785. Samuel Bailey and Betsey Maning married. 
Dec. 14, 1785. Paul Clark, of Hartford, and Betsey Wright, 
of Lebanon, married. 

Martha, daughter of Nathaniel Storrs, born July 10, 1780. 
Sella, born May 15, 1782. 
Fidelia, born Oct. 8, 1784. 
Hannah, born Nov. 9, 1786. 
Feb. 22, 1785. Walter Peck and Christen Taggart married. 
Betsey, daughter of Walter Peck, born Dec. 2, 1785. 
March 19, 1786. Roger Hebbard and Sarah Stickney married. 
Mary, daughter of Roger and Sarah Hebbard, born Nov. 3, 
1786. 

Susanna, daughter of Roger and Sarah Hebbard, born March 
I, 1788. 

Jan. 18, 1785. Sluman Lathrop and Katharine Avery 
married. 

Amos Avery, son of Sluman and Katharine Lathrop, born 
May 4, 1787. 

Hannah, daughter of Sluman and Katharine Lathrop, born 
Feb. 15, 1789. 

Dec. 20, 1787. Lewis Crossett and Betsey Hatch married. 
Jan. 31, 1788. John George and Lydia Valyar married by 
Rev. Isaiah Potter. 

June 19, 1788. Frederick Cook and Abigail Packard mar- 
ried by Rev. Isaiah Potter. 

Dec. 25, 1788. Elijah Lyman and Polly Waterman mar- 
ried by Rev. Isaiah Potter. 

April 6, 1774. Charles Saxton and Rachel Waters married. 
Rachel, born July 18, 1775. 
Charles, born June 25, 1777. 
Hiram, born May 2, 1779. 



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V 24^ LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

David, born June 21, 1781. 

Phile, born Dec. 5, 1784. 
Anna and Eunice, twin daughters of Sherebiab and Sarah Bal- 
lard, born March 10, 1789. Anna died March 30, 1789. 

John, son of Simon Peter and Lucretia Slapp, born Sept. 19, 
1776; died Aug. 25, 1778. 

Polly, born Aug. 10, 1778. 

Lucy, born Sept. 3, 1781. 

Sally, born May 20, 1784. 

John, born June 7, 1787. 
Betsey, daughter of Ichabod and Rachel Packard, born Nov, 
25, 1780. 

Sally, born Aug. 8, 1782; died March 29, 1786. 

Chamberlin, born A4ay 21, 1784. 

Ichabod, born Sept. 8, 1786; died Sept. 16, 1786. 

Rachel, born July 8, 1787. 
Phiheas, son of Dr. Phineas and Lucy Parkhurst, born March 
2, 1785. 

Lucy, daughter of Dr. Phineas and Lucy Parkhurst, born 
May 15, 1790. 

Moses, son of Beriah and Polly Abbot, born April 21, 1787. 
John, son of Nathaniel Wheatley, born April 12, 1781. 
' Luther, son of Nathaniel Wheatley, born Oct. 14, 1783. 

Lucy, daughter of Nathaniel Wheatley, born June 16, 1788. 

Ziba, son of Jesse Cook, born Feb. 19, 1790. 

June 22, 1785. Daniel Willes and Agness Karr married. 

James, born Oct. 18, 1785. 

Jesse, born Aug. 29, 1787, 

Betsey, born Aug. 25, 1789. 
June 18, 1770. Moses Hebbard and Elizabeth Whitaker, 
married by Nathan Ker, V. D. M., of Goshen, N. Y. 

Aaron, born Feb. 6, 1771. 

Eunice, born July 7, 1775 ; died Aug. 5, 1777. 

Eunice, born Oct. 27, 1777. 

Polly, born Sept. 4, 1779. 

Philena, born Feb. 13, 1782. 



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, LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 243 

1 Dec. 21, 1780. John Fox and Elizabeth Jieth married. 

Eunice, born Nov. 11, 178 1. 

John, born June 10, 1784. 

Hannah', born Aug. 23, 1786. 

Lucinda, born Oct. 31, 1789. 
Elizabeth, wife of Moses Hebard, died March 8, 1786. 
Dec. 7, 1786. Moses Hebard and Hannah Alden married 
by Rev. Isaiah Potter. » 

Nov. 17, 1789. Edmund Freeman, Jr., and Zilpha Pool 
' married by Rev. Isaiah Potter. 

Lemuel Hough, born Dec. 12, 1748. 
Hannah Lathrop, born March 22, 1747. 

Feb. 18, 1773. Lemuel Hough and Hannah Lathrop mar- 
ried. 

Betsey, born July 19, 1773. • 

Borridwill, born March 20, 1775; died Jan. 22, 1776. 

Guy, born Aug. 13, 1776. 

Elisha, born Nov. 27, 1777*, died June 12, 1778. 

Dan, born March 3, 1779. 

Hannah, born July 20, 1780. 

Levina, born Oct. 14, 1781. 

Ira, born Jan. 12, 1783 ; died May 13, 1783. 

Polly, born July 3, 1784. 
\ Pamela, born Sept. 25, 1785. 

Lemuel, born Aug. 12, 1788. 

Joseph, born Oct. 31, 1790. 
Oct. 3, 1780. Constant Storrs and Lucinda How married. 

William, born Sept. 7, 1781. 

Luther, born Jan. 18, 1784. 

Constant, born Jan. 25, 1786. 

Dan, born Feb. 19, 1788. 

Seth, born March 4, 1790. 
June 5, 1783. Samuel Crocker and Betsey Stoddard married. 

Polly, born Feb. 24, 1784. 

Bernice, born Dec. 10, 1785. 

Philura, born Oct. 11, 1788. 



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a44 LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

Elias, son of Elisha and Ruth Ticknor, born April 8, 1769. 
Jan. 2, 1772. Elisha Ticknor and Deborah Davis married. 
Deborah, born Jan. 21, 1773. 
James, born Oct. 25, 1776. 
Samuel, born June 8, 1778. 
Ruth, born Jan. 28, 1781. 
William, born July i, 1785. 
Tryphena, born April 8, 1787. 
David, born May 22, 1789. 
Mary, daughter of Daniel Phelps, born Aug. 28, 1788. 
Timothy, son of Daniel Phelps, born Oct. 8, 1788. 
Moses, son of Moses and Hannah Hebard, born Sept. 15, 
1787; died Sept. 27, 1787. 

Plannah, daughter of Moses and Hannah Hebard, born Jan. 
21, 1789. 

Oct. 4, 1785. Paul Knowles Ticknor and Polly Adams 
married. 

Polly, daughter of Paul and Polly Ticknor, born Dec. 15, 1788. 
Ede, daughter of Paul and Polly Ticknor, born Feb. 21, 1791. 
April 9, 1789. John Ticknor, of Lebanon, and Mabel 
Green, of Plainfield, married. 

Sally, daughter of John and Mabel Ticknor, born Feb. 10, 
1790. 

Lucy, daughter of John and Grace Andrus, born Aug. 15, 
1771. 

Cypran, born June 22, 1772. 
Elijah, born Aug. 22, 1775. 
Richard, born Aug. 25, 1777. 
Elam, born Aug. 3, 1779. ' 

Luther, born Nov. 18, 1782. 
Robert, born Nov. 26, 1783. 
Satter, son of Enoch and Lucy Freeman, born Aug. 9, 1789. 
Norman, son of Enoch and Lucy P^reeman, born May 31, 

1791- 

Lucy, daughter of Enoch and Lucy Freeman, born Dec. 20, 

1790. 



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LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. \ 245 

Cady, son of Cady and Partheney Allen, born Oct. 11, 1788. 
Alice, daughter of Cady and Partheney Allen, born May 17, 
1791. 

John, son of Abel Lyman, born April 2, 1780. 

Abel, son of Abel Lyman, born Feb. 2, 1782. 

Dec. 29, 1773. Henery Woodward and Anne Peas married, 

Henery, born Oct. 12, 1774. 

Elias, born July 24, 1776. 

Theodorah, born March 3, 1778; died Sept. 7, 1779. 

Hannah, born Nov. 19, 1780. 

Ziba, born Sept. 27, 1782. 

Thirzah, born May 11, 1784. ' 
Sally, daughter of Nathaniel Hall, Jr., born Feb. 5, 1784. 

Stephen Bliss and Sarah Griswold married, . ; 

' Ziba, born May — , . 

John, born Dec. 15, 1783. 

Anne, born July 29, 1785. 

Stephen, born Alarch 29, 1787. 

Benjamin, born Sept. 13, 1788. 
Oct. 14, 1 781. Samuel Estabrook and Phebe Palmer mar- 
ried. 

Nehemiah, born April 12, 1783. 

Joseph, born Nov. 6, 1784. 

Benjamin, born Jan. 26, 1787. 
Eunice, daughter of Aaron Graham, born Feb. 24, 1775. 
Ana, daughter of Capt. John Laseil, born Sept. 7, 1779. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. John Laseil, born March 9, 

1783. • 

Sept. 20, 1 78 1. Nathaniel Porter and Olive Sterns married. 

Experience, born July 30, 1782. 

Samuel Storrs, born Jan. 18, 1784. 

Olive, born P'eb. i, 1786. 

Olive, born Dec. 13, 1787; died Dec. 17, 1787. 
Sufa, daughter of Andrew Wheatley, born Nov. 4, 1785. 
Nathaniel, son of Nathaniel Wheatley, born Jan. 21, 1786. 
Andrew, son of Shercbiah Ballard, born May 26, 1786. 



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M(> LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 

Luclnda, daughter of Zenas Alden, born Aug. 13, 1784. 
Susanna, daughter of Zenas Alden, born Jan. 21, 1787. 
Eliab, son of Zenas Alden, born March 12, 1789. 
Nathaniel Porter, died Nov. 2, 1779. 
Eleaser Mather Porter, died Feb. 22, 1779. 
Folly, daughter of Nathaniel Porter, born Nov. 23, 1789. 
Abigail, daughter of Nathaniel Porter, born Jan. 11, 1792. 
Rusel, son of James Crocker, died Sept. 11, 1779. 
Joseph, died Sept. 14, 1779. 
James, died Oct. 17, 1779. 
Sarah, born Dec. 31, 1779. 
James, Born Nov. 14, 1782. 
James, Jr., born June 20, 1783. 
Lydia, born July 14, 1784. 
James, born April 8, 1786. 
Joseph, born Aug. 5, 1788. 
Benjamin, son of Benjamin, Jr., and Abigail Fuller, born July 
14, 1778. 

Jesse, son of Benjamin, Jr., and Abigail Fuller, born April 1 1, 
1780. 

John, son of Benjamin, Jr., and Abigail Fuller, born Dec. 18, 
1781. 

May 5, 1769. James Hartshorn, of Lebanon, N. H., and 
*Bethiah Elddridge, of Mansfield, Conn., married. 
L^ July II, 1770. John Gray and Mary Millington, both of 

Lebanon, married. 

Nov. 22, I 77 1. Nehemiah Estabrook and Elizabeth Slapp, 
both of Lebanon, N. H., married. 

April 17, 1765. Silas Waterman and Silence Case married. 
Sept. 6, 1770. James Jones and Sarah Paddleford married. 
April 5, 1770. Benjamin Fuller, Jr., and Abigail Paddleford 
married. ♦ 

Sept. 23, 1773. Deacon Nehemiah Estabrook, of Lebanon, 
N. H., and Anna Bliss, of Springfield, married. 

May 12, 1774. Jeremiah Griswold and Rebekah Estabrook, 
both of Lebanon, married. 



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' LEBANON, N. H., RECORDS. 247 

Jan. 18, 1776. Nathaniel Wheatley and Vinal Bliss married. 
June 18, 1778. Elkannah Sprague and Lydia Wheatley, both 
of Lebanon, N. H., married by Rev. Silvanus Ripley, of Dres- 
den. 

Dec. 31, 1778. Robert Colbarn and Lucinda Wheatley, both 
-of Lebanon, N. H., married by Rev. Silvanus Ripley, of Dres- 
den. 

Dec. 12, 1780. Daniel Hough and Lydia Edgerton married. 
April I, 1784. Daniel Blodget and Mary Bliss, both of 
Lebanon, N. H., married. 

Sept. 26, 1780. Samuel Wood and Eunice Bliss, both of 
Lebanon, N. H., married. 

Feb. 7, 1790. Rufus Lathrop and Marg;aret Huntington, 
i married. 

I March 18, 1 79-. Jedidiah Griswold and Sufy Waters mar- 

3 .xied. 



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INSCRIPTIONS FROM SCHOOL STREET CEMETERY, 

LEBANON, N. H. 



Copied by Byron N. Clark. 



Mary, wife of Beriah Abbott, died July^lQ, 1813, aged 58. 

Daniel Aldcn, died Jan. 27, 181 7, aged 64. 

Sarah, wife of Daniel Alden, died Dec. 15, 1817, aged 56. 

Roxcena, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Alden, died A4ay 15, 
1 81 2, aged 20. 

Seth, son of Daniel and Sarah Alden, born March 5, 1799 ; 
died Aug. 2, 1803. 

Dolly, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Alden, born April i, 
1801 ; died July 23, 1802. 

Dolly, 2nd, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Alden, born Jan. 
19, 1803 ; died May 23, 1803. 

Lorra, daughter of Elisha and Fanna Aldrich, died Aug. 30, 
1803, aged 2. 

Andrew Aldrich, born in Situate, R. L, died July 21, 1803, 
aged 60. 

Sarah, daughter of Cady and Parthenie Allen, died March 23, 
1 81 7, aged 24. 

Ozias Allen, died Sept. 8, 1814, aged 36. 

Cady Allen, died Aug. 5, 18 18, aged 64. 
• Cady Allen, Jr., died Sept. 24, 1819, aged 31. 

Abigail Allen, died Nov. 16, 18 16, aged 24. 

Edwin, son of Diarea and Rebekah Allen, died April 2, 1804, 

aged 3. 

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LEBANON, N. H., CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS. 249 

Laura, daughter of Diarea and Rebekah Allen, died Nov. 21, 

1803, of small pox, aged 7 months. 
Mary, daughter of Joseph and Mary Amsden, died Nov. — , 

1804, aged 25. 

Bridget, wife of John Arnold, o. Mansfield, Conn,, died in 
Lebanon, Aug. 2, 18 16, aged 81. 

Zalmon, son of Zalmon and Hannah Aspinwall, died March 
15, 1814, aged 31. 

Eunice, daughter of Sherebiah and Sarah Ballard, died Jan. 
29, , aged II. 

George S., son of Samuel and Belinda Barrows, died Sept. 16, 
1813, aged4. 

Martha, wife of Thomas Barrov.'S, died Dec. 23, I0I9, aged 

h 64. 

Martha Jane, daughter of Calvin and Mary Benton, died Sept. 
17, 1819, aged II months. 

Hannah Cram Blaisdell, born Dec. 18, 1808; died June 27, 
1811. 

Mary Ann Blaisdell, born Aug. 9, 1817 ; died Sept. 14, 181 7. 

Ebenezer Bliss, died May 10, 1810, aged 72. 

Harry, son of Daniel and Polly Bliss, died July 29, 18 10, 
aged 16. 

Harriet, daughter of Daniel and Polly Bliss, died Jan. 17, 
1 81 7, aged 22. 

Thaddeus, son of Deacon Asa and Sally Bond, died Nov. i, 

1804, aged 17. 
Molly Bosworth, died June 24, 1801, aged 50. 
Edward, son of Edward and Hannah Bosworth, died Aug. 16, 

1802, aged 2. 

Roxana, daughter of Edward and Hannah Bosworth, died 
May 7, 1 8 10, aged 17. 

Jonathan Bosworth, died Aug. 26, 1815, aged 88. 

Mary, wife of Jonathan Bosworth, died May i, 18 14, aged 

85. 

Lieut. Josiah Bowen, died Feb. 15, 1817, aged 60. 

Cynthia, wife of Paul Buswell, died Oct. 24, 1818, aged 25. 



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250 LEBANON, N. H., CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS. 

Austin, son of Stephen and Marium Colburn, died Sept. 10, 
1819, aged 26. 

Oliva, daughter of Capt. Jesse and Philena Cook, died Feb. 13, 

1803, aged 2 months. 

Jesse Cook, died May 10, i8ci, aged 62. 
. Mehetable Delano, died Oct. 17, 18 14, aged 88. 

Abigail, wife of James M. Dill, and daughter of Joseph and 
Mary Amsden, died Sept. — , 1806, aged 25. 

James M., son of James M. and Abigail Dill, died June — , 
1806, ao;ed 10 months. 

Deacon Zaccheus Downer, died May 16, 18 li, aged 74. 

Sally, daughter of Deacon Zaccheus and Tabitha Downer, 
died March 29, 1801, aged 16. 

Hannah, wife of Silas Downer, died May 29, 1803, aged 41- 

Horace Hooker, son of Jabez and Betsey Duglass, died April 
18, 1817. 

Benjamin, son of John and Lydia Durkee, died April 13, 
1817, aged 8 months. 

Nathan Durkee, died Feb. 3, 1807, aged 52. 

Benjamin Durkee, died July 12, 1816, aged 27. 

Benjamin Edwards, died Feb. 2, 1804, ^g^^ ^2. 

Jabiz Edwards, died Sept. 14, 18 14, aged 30. 

Zuar Eldridge, died June 29, 181 2, aged 46. 

Mary, daughter of Zuar and Polly Eldridge, died May 30, 
1814, aged 21. 

Guy, son of Zuar and Polly Eldridge, died Nov. 15, 181 5, 
aged 24. 

Rachel, daughter of Zuar and Polly Eldridge, died Oct. 17, 

1804, aged I. 

Irena, wife of Capt. Joseph Ellis, died April 14, 1809, aged 
72. 

Almira, daughter of Samuel and Anna Gage, died April 3> 
1799, aged 7. 

Nathaniel Gould, died Sept. 3, 181 7, aged 45. 

Prudence, daughter of N. and E. Gould, died March 13, 18 18, 
aged 2. . 



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LEBANON, N. H., CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS. 251 

Norman B., son of Moses and Cynthia Greenough, died July 
29, 18 1 8, aged 15 months. 

Ruth, wife of Bracket L. Greenough, died Sept. 16, 1804, 
aged 25. 

Charity, wife of John Hamilton, died Dec. 31, 18 18, aged 

83- 

Betsey Hamilton, died Sept. 11, 1802, aged 10 months. 
Susana, first wife of Aaron Hebard, died Feb. 16, 1807, ^g^^ 

37- 

James Hebard, died Dec. 18, 1807, aged 58. 

Thomas Hough, died April 28, 1815, aged 46. 

Sally, wife of Thomas Hough, died May 9, 1798, aged 21. 

Thomas, son of Thomas and Sally Hough, died March 25, 
1796, aged 2. 

Dyer, son of Thomas and Sally Hough, died May 24, 181 5, 
aged 15. 

Major James Howe, born at Brookfield, Mass., March 10, 
1774; died Nov. 13, 18 10, aged 37. 

Charles Frederic, son of James and Betsey Howe, died May 
21, 1 8 10, aged I. 

Deacon Theophelus Huntington, died March 19, 18 13, aged 
86. 

Lois, wife of Deacon Theophelus Huntington, died Nov. 17, 
1815, aged 84. 

Ziba, first son of Capt. Ziba and Sela Huntington, died Nov. 

9i 1797^ ^ged i6- 

Sela, wife of Ziba Huntington, died Nov. 24, 18 18, aged 45. 

Susanna Johnson, died Aug. 2, 18 16, aged 42.. . 

Thomas Joslyn, died Dec. 5, 181 2, aged 32. 

Mary, daughter of James and Sarah Joslyn, died May 9, 18 10, 
aged 19. 

Elizabeth Lathrop, died Feb, 17, 181 2, aged 72. 

Ethelinda, wife of William Loomer, born , 1779; died 

, 1815. 

Susanna Martin, died Nov. 7, 18 17, aged 52. 

Polly T., wife of Joseph Martin, died Sept. 16, 18 19, aged 40. 



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Lieut. Nathaniel Packard, died Sept. 22, 18 14, aged 83. 

Clement, son of David and Mary Packard, died Nov. 17, 1799, 
aged II. 

Anna, daughter of David and Mary Packard, died May 25, 
1796, aged 6. 

Polly, daughter of David and Mary Packard, died Feb. 14, 
1796, aged 2. 

Anna C, daughter of William H. and Lucretia Packard, died 
July 15, 1 8 16, aged i year and 3 months. 

Ichabod Packard, Jr., son of Ichabod and Rachel Packard, 
died June 22, 1808. 

Horace, son of Dr. Phineas and Lucy Parkhurst, died Jan. 31, 
18 1 7, aged 16. 

Dr. Phineas Parkhurst, Jr., died May 31, 18 19, aged 34. 

Harriet Peabody, died Nov. 13, 18 16, aged 10. 

Anna, wife of Jahleel Peck, died Aug. 8, 1804, aged 38. 

John, son of Ebba and Margret Peck, died June 19, 1802, 

aged 4. 

Joseph, son of Simeon and Ruth Peck, died Aug. 17, 1801, 

aged 27. 

Simeon Peck, died June 4, 18 14, aged 82. 

Lovisa, wife of Rev. David Pickering, died Feb. 12, 18 14, 
aged 24. 

Carlos, only son of Rev. David and Lovisa Pickering,- died 
Feb. 2, 1 8 14, aged 10 months. 

Laura, daughter of Arnold and Submit Porter, died April 5, 
181 8, aged 6. 

Martha, daughter of John and Martha Porter, born at Bridge- 
water, Mass., Sept. 14, 1780; died Sept. 21, 1800, aged 20. 

John Porter, died May 14, 181 7, aged 74. 

Joanna, first wife of Andrew Post, born Oct. 15, 1773; f^'^'^ 
Dec. 18, 1 8 13, aged 40. 

Andrew Jackson, son of Andrew and Hannah Post, died Ju!v 
31, 181 8, aged 16 months. 

Rev. Isaiah Potter, died July 2, 18 17, aged 71. Settled in the 
ministry in Lebanon, Aug. 25, 1772. 



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LEBANON, N. H., CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS. 253 

Thomas, son of Thomas and Susanna Rea, late of Scotland, 
1 born Sept. 23, 1801 ; died Nov. 11, 1802, aged i. 

Enoch Redington, died Feb. i, 1804, aged 17. 

Eunice, wife of Jacob C. Richardson, died Nov. 19, 1816, 
aged 35. 

Richard, son of Edward and Percy Ruggles, died April — , 
1805. 

Galvin, son of Deacon William and Elizabeth Sanborn, died 
April 6, 18 16, aged 8. ' 

Experience, wife of William Scales, died June 10, 1802, aged 

36. 

Ebenezer Senier, a native of Cavvthorne, Yorkshire, England, 
died Jan. 11, 1802, aged 25. 

Lucinda, daughter of Capt. Arad and Bridget Simons, died 
Aug. I, 1 81 6, aged 19. 

Fanny, daughter of Capt. Arad and Bridget Simons, died July 
II, 1808, aged 15. 

Elizabeth, wife of John Slapp, died Dec. 26, 1799, aged 81. 

Hiram S., son of Daniel and Rachel Smith, died Jan. 20, 18 12, 
aged 12. 

Jacob, son of Samuel and Louisa Smith, born Aug. 20, 18 14; 
• died March 17, 18 15. 

Abigail, wife of David Snell, died Aug. 10, 1 806, aged 78. 

Edwin, son of Elijah and Polly Sprague, died Aug. 21, 1800, 
aged 2. 

Parmelia, daughter of Constant and Elvira Storrs, died March 
27, 181 3, aged 3 months. 
? . Deacon Nathaniel Storrs, died Aug. 25, 18 13, aged 67. 

I Seth, son of Col. Constant and Lucinda Storrs, died Aug. 21, 

I 1812, aged 22. 

Lucinda, daughter of Col. Constant and Lucinda Storrs, died 
Nov. 18, 18 14, aged 22. 

Ruth, wife of Eliphalet Wells, died Sept. 29, 181 2, aged 36. 

Lydia, wife of David Whitmore, died Sept. 3, 1808, aged 69. 

David, son of David and Harmony Whitmore, died Sept. 1 1, 
1 8 16, aged 19. 






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a54 LEBANON, N. H., CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS. 

Joel, son of James and Rachel Willis, died Jan. 29, 181 2, 
aged 20 months. 

Infant daughter of James and Rachel Willis, died June 14, 
18 1 2. 

Agnes, daughter of John Winnek, formerly of Boston, born 
Jan. 27, 1789; died March 26, 1806. 

Lucy Hewitt, first wife of Ephraim Wood, died Sept. 11, 
1815, aged 29. 

Sarah, daughter of Captain Joseph Wood, Jr., and Sarah, died 
Feb. 25, 18 18, aged 2. 

David Woodbury, died Oct. 3, 1816, aged 54. 

Hiram, son of Samuel and Rebecca Young, died Aug. 8, 18 18, 
aged I. 



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THE GERMAN MIGRATION TO THE AMERICAN 

COLONIES.* 



There have recently issued from the American press two 
books, both telling the same story in much the same way ; one 
more scholarl}^ than the other; each intended to present in a 
concise and popular manner the history of German migration to 
the American colonies and its importance in the formation of 
American nationality. 
I Both authors appear to have been led to the publication of their 

books from the lack of a comprehensive account of the part Ger- 
mans have had in the up-growth of this country, and of the 
ignorance among Americans of this pre-revolutionary stock, 
of what their ancestors really were ; an ignorance shared gener- 
ally by all classes of Americans. 

While much has been written concerning the part taken by the 
i Scotch-Irish in the opening up of the western portions of the 

^ middle and southern colonies, scant justice has been paid to 

the German element in the foundation of our country. Full 
credit has been given the descendants of the stern covenanters. 
For fifty years prior to the Revolution they pressed their way 
west and south along the valleys and crests of the Blue Moun- 
tains. The historian has too readily ascribed to the indefatigable 

* The drinan and Swiss Settlemeyits of Colonial Pennsylvania : A Study of 
the So-called Pennsylvania Dutch. By Oscar Kuhns. New York : Henry Holt &: 
Co., 1900. 8vo., pp. 268. 

The Germans in Colonial Times. By Lucy Forney Bittenger. Phila- 
delphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1901. 8vo., pp. 314. 

*■ ♦ 

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256 GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 

energy of the Scotch-Irish, the development of the country 
adjacent to their settlements and the type of frontiersman 
which has become famous in history and romance, as the typical 
hunter and " rifleman " of the colonial and revolutionary strug- 
gles. This result is largely due to the great aptitude of the 
Scotch-Irish for politics and trade, and the advantage possessed in 
speaking English. The great Scotch-Irish migration W3.s greatly 
stimulated by the harsh measures taken by the British authorities 
against Presbyterianism in Ireland, but the most potent cause 
u^as the economic condition which prevailed in Ulster. The 
trade jealousy of the English manufacturers who had the 
political power to handicap and ruin their Ulster com- 
petitors ; the avarice or policy of the large landowners who 
permitted the leases, then falling in in great numbers, to be 
taken up by the native Irish, glad to regain a footing in the 
country of which they had been forcibly dispossessed, even at 
the expense of decency in living, operated to render the lot of 
the independent Protestant settlers unbearable and to excite 
anew the spirit of unrest. 

This migration from Ulster began at about the same period as 
the great German migration, and was directed very largely to the 
same colonies. The conditions which brought about the migra- 
tion from Germany were in many respects similar to those operat- 
ing in Ulster. In Germany there was religious persecution, legal 
spoliation, and, moreover, in many parts, the devastation brought 
on by war. 

The persecuted sectary or war impoverished farmer from the 
small German duchies and principalities, who sought refuge in 
America was the representative of an element, numerically* as 
strong, as patient, as thrifty and orderly as that represented by 
the Scottish farmers dispossessed of their leaseholds in Ireland. 

The German was courageous, though probably less easily 



*It is estimated that as many as 200,000 Germans came to the colonies. 
The estimate of more than double that number allowed for the Scotch-Irish 
migration is certainly a great exaggeration. 



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GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 257 

excited, as persistent in military affairs, in which frequently he had 
had experience, and as often victorious as his Scottish neighbors 
of more warlike tastes and reputation. Their sufferings from 
Indian raids may be read in the same words which describe the 
destruction of the homes of pioneers of any other nationality, 
and as frequently, by any one who has the patience to search the 
records and reports of the day. 

The German colonist resembled the Scotch-Irish, in that he was 
most frequently a man of small or without means, of comparatively 
limited education, but with a tolerance of the views of others 
greatly to his credit. Among them were men of education, 
of noble birth, and of wide experience, who were easily leaders 
of their countrymen, and apparently so accepted with less opposi- 
tion from the mass than was the case among either the English 
or Scotch. In a measure, this was due to the religious way of 
life of a great section of the people, and their connection with 
the great and peace-loving colony of Pennsylvania. 

The history of German colonization prior to the Revolution 
is but partially told in the great number of local and general his- 
I tories, ecclesiastical and otherwise. It is the history, in a great 

part, of the Mohawk Valley, of Pennsylvania, of the western 
parts of Maryland and Virginia, and of the Carolinas, not to 
mention localities in New England, in Georgia, and on the 
Mississippi, and shows, in a striking manner, the possession Oi 
traits eminently qualifying the German for a colonist. 

At that time the German emigrant was of necessity a pioneer, 
and he achieved equal success with his English speaking fellow 
colonists in the difficult work of subduing the wilderness and 
accommodating himself to circumstances. It is true that the 
migration from Germany did not commence until after the Eng- 
lish had been established In New England and Virginia for more 
than half a century, but it is also true that these hardy German 
pioneers did not hesitate to pierce the wildernesses of Pennsyl- 
vania and of the Blue Ridge, facing the perils of Indian hostility 
as bravely as the New Englanders had faced like perils two or 
three generations earlier. They turned the forest lands into 



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258 GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 

gardens. At the present day the county of Lancaster is the 
richest county in ao;ricuIture in the United States. 

Pennsylvania was the keystone of the Germanic colony, 
and was largely Germanic in religion, speech, and economy. It 
became the hope of the persecuted religious bodies in Ger- 
many. This arose probably from Penn's personal acquaintance 
with some of the leaders of the Mennonites and Pietists, 
who held many views similar to the Friends, and later from 
the knowledge disseminated by the letters of the emigrants. 
In that colony many material advantages could be had beside 
the vastly more important one of liberty of conscience. As 
soon as Penn obtained his grant of lands in America, he caused 
to be circulated in Germany pamphlets descriptive of the embryo 
province. These were quickly translated into German and the 
result was the formation of the Frankfort Company and an 
informal association at Crefield. None of the former ever 
came to America, but weavers from Crefield and other Men- 
nonites from Krisheim became the pioneers in the German 
migration. 

Pastorius, the leader of these pioneers, a man of wide culture, 
preceded them by six weeks; the main company landed from 
the " Concord," 6 October, 1683, and commenced the settlement 
known as Germantown. Pastorius was born in Sommerhausen, 
26 Sept., 163 1, studied at the un'versities of Strasburg, Basel, 
Erfurt, Jena, and Altdorf. His travels in Holland, France, and 
England culminated at Frankfort in 1682 where he became 
interested in the project of American emigration. 

It was these men and their associates, who, five years later, 
entered a protest against slaveholding. 

Nearly contemporaneous with the Germantown settlement was 
that of a small number, a considerable portion Germans, of fol- 
lowers of Labadie, a sect so strict in their rules and belief that 
after the pressure of persecution was removed, it was found 
impossible, in their new-world home, to retain their community 
of interest. This party settled in Maryland, on Chesapeake Bay, 
at Bohemia Manor. Their settlement was called the " Labadie 



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GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 259 

Tract," but they were soon absorbed and lost to sight among 
the growing English and German settlements. 

The great migration did not begin till nearly a generation 
later. Pennsylvania became the home of more than one strange 
sect, who sought to carry out their mystic and peculiar ideas in 
a free country. Such were the followers of Zimmermann, sep- 
aratists from the Lutheran church, who maintained the most 
curious ideas and lived a harmless, ascetic life on the Wissa- 
hickon. In contrast to these mystics were the Moravians. Count 
Zinzendorf, exiled in 1736, had been the protector of a remnant 
of this sect in Saxony, l^he first essay of these good people 
at American settlement was in Georg;ia, but driven thence by 
misfortune to Pennsylvania, a permanent settlement was effected 
at Nazareth and Bethlehem (1741). • 

Zinzendorf had the project of uniting the various Christian 
churches in a sort of league, the " Congregation of God in the 
Spirit," which was abandoned to take up the successful work of 
Indian missions. To the careful plans and wisely ordered 
administration of the Moravian colonies is due the striking suc- 
cess of the Germanic settlements in the Carolinas. 

The cold winter of 1708 caused immense suffering through- 
out Europe; in the Rhine country it came as a culmination of 
all the misery engendered by war, misgovernment, and legalized 
robbery of the people. The following spring the starved, wretched 
people flocked to the Low Countries and passed in droves to 
England where they met with compassion and public and 
private aid, until their numbers, estimated at 15,000 in London 
alone, necessitated radical measures to provide for them. Some 
returned to Germany, others were planted in Ireland, and some 
under the leadership of De GrafFenried planted the ill-fated col- 
ony of Newbern in Carolina destined to suffer in the Indian 
outbreak. Some of the survivors were fortunate in finding a 
patron in Alexander Spotswood, Governor of Virginia. He 
settled them at Germanna in the western country where they 
became a nucleus of an important community. 

About 3,000 of the Palatines were sent to New York and^ 



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a6o GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 

after what seems to have been the usual vicissitudes '*of the 
"assisted emigrant,'* the prey of speculators, in those days, 
found what they thought to be a permanent and peaceful home 
on the Schoharie. Failing to obtain the earnestly sought after 
validation of their land claims, some joined their coreligionists in 
Pennsylvania", others accepted land grants on the Mohawk, and, 
joined by later arrivals, turned that river for thirty miles into a 
miniature Rhine. 

Contemporaneous with the exodus to England of the Pala- 
tines, persecution against the Mennonites broke out in Switzer- 
land. This was followed by the emigration to America of a 
small number of families, assisted by the '^ Committee on Foreign 
Needs," an organization formed at Rotterdam to cope with the 
question of emigration, then assuming great proportions. This 
little group was but the forerunner of an immense stream of emi- 
grants. The Rotterdam Committe was obliged, from lack of 
means to assist all comers, to send emissaries to intercept the 
parties traveling toward that city and turn them back. Finally, 
an indication of the origin of the movement, they wrote (1732) 
to the congregations in America beseeching them to cease prais- 
ing their new home and its opportunities in writing to their 
friends in the fatherland. 

During this period, 1710-32, thousands of emigrants had been 
assisted to make the journey to their Canaan in the New World. 
Mr. Kuhns, whose estimates are most conservative, suggests 
that prior to 1727 the German population of Pennsylvania was 
about 20,000. He shows that between 1727 and 1733 over 
5,000 German and Swiss emigrants arrived at the port of Phila- 
delphia. In the fifty years prior to 1775, nearly 70,000 emi- 
grants of these nationalities are officially recorded as arrivals at 
Philadelphia. The inability of the friends of the emigrants to assist 
all comers, opened up that business of transportation, flourishing 
alike from the freights of Germans and Scotch-Irish, which was 
at the same time one of the most useful and terribly miserable of 
the means by which the despairing inhabitants of the Rhineland 
and of Ulster sought to reach America. Under the system which 



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GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 261 

was developed, though not originated, at this time, emigrants 
sold themselves to serve for a period of years, to those who agreed 
to transport them to America. The cost of transportation alone 
varied from five pounds upward per person, to which should 
be added the cost of maintenance during an ocean voyage of 
from three to six weeks or even longer, a period in which 
unscrupulous shipmasters used every devise to increase the debt. 

Upon arrival at Philadelphia or other port, these " Redemp- 
tioners," as they were called, were sold to planters and others 
for their debt. They were usually persons of lowly condi- 
tion, though of good morals, but among them were also num- 
bered persons of good education and family, unable to carry out 
their plans in other wavs. The hardship which this system 
involved was great, but unbearable as it would seem at the present 
day, was in keeping with the sentiments and customs of the time. 
Probably in the majority of the cases this aggravated form of 
apprenticeship was not without its compensations, especially in a 
new country where the relations between master and servant, 
except in the higher circles, were on a plane of almost social 
equality. But in many cases the redemptioner was little better 
than a white slave. So many cases of injustice came to light 
that local societies were formed to protect the emigrant, and 
finally laws were made for his better protection. 

Before passing from the part Pennsylvania played in this great 
German migration, this " Volkerwanderung," mention must be 
made of that little settlement at Ephrata which became famous 
I in colonial times and was the centre of peculiar institutions and 

literature. 

Conrad Beissel, exile from Heidelberg, a Palatine and emigrant 
to Pennsylvania, having joined his fortunes with the Dunkards, 
soon gathered about him a circle of fanatics who accepted his 
peculiar views, especially that which enjoined celibacy. In the 
height of its prosperity, the cloister founded by Beissel at Ephrata 
sheltered three hundred inmates. There the brotherhood, which 
included women, acquired wealth and lived a pure life. T^hey 
practiced the monastic arts, illuminated manuscripts, cultivated 



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i62 GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 

choral singing, and established the printing press which has given 
them such an enduring reputation, from which appeared some of 
the earliest and finest examples of colonial bookmaklng. Beissal, 
himself, fell into evil ways, his vanity and love of drink proving 
too much for him, but maintained his control over the cloister 
till his death In 1768. 

Before 1730 the German migration had passed the limits of 
the Province of Pennsylvania and settlers of this nativity were to 
be found on the upper Potomac and In the northwestern parts 
of Virginia. The stream of migration southward was largely 
increased by additions of American-born Germans. The Ger- 
manna colony has already been noted. One of the earlier com- 
panies to settle in Maryland was led by a Palatine schoolmaster, 
John Thomas Schley, ancestor of Admiral W. S. Schley. These 
pioneers of Frederick County opened trade with the German 
settlements to the north and through the Valley of Virginia, fast 
becoming filled with their countrymen. Throughout that wide 
stretch of country, as in the Carolinas to the south, the German 
descent of a large section of the present Inhabitants Is amply 
testified to by names either wholly German, or in an anglicized 
or corrupted form. Of sterling worth, unflinching In their views 
as to life and religion, which did not encourage a liberal educa- 
tion, these German colonists have not left to as great an extent as 
the English and Scotch-Irish, an impress upon the history of their 
state. Their solid traits of character have become common to 
the whole community through intermarriage and association with 
other races. The present population of those regions Is as dis- 
tinctively American In all Its principal characteristics as that of 
any part of the United States. 

The Carolinas received their quota of the German migration 
from two distinct sources. Settlers arrived from the older homes 
of the race in America by way of Virginia. There were also 
emigrants attracted to the country by the announcements ot 
land speculators, promotors, and letters of friends. Before the 
Revolution, the highlands of the Carolinas, in many localities, 
■were as essentially German as districts in Pennsylvania. 



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GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 263 

The accession from the old country to the German settlements 
from the Mohawk to Georgia was constant, but in ever varying 
numerical force. As the great struggle between the colonies 
-and England approached its crisis the sentiment of the Ger- 
man Americans seems to have crystalized favorable to the patriots. 
In the French wars the German colonists had supplied their share 
of soldiers and won praise ; now that men were demanded to 
enforce the rights of the colonists the response was prompt. In 
the Mohawk Valley there was, perhaps, a stronger " loyalist " or 
Tory sentiment than in any other German community. It is 
said that at the fiercely contested battle of Oriskany, where 
the brave Herkimer received his fatal wound, the attacking force 
of British was largely composed of German Tories. Throughout 
I that district, however, were so many Dutch families and the 

resemblance in names so great, that it is well to refrain from 
positive statements. 

The student of colonial times cannot but note with interest 
how the sons and grandsons of the original settlers, and in many 
cases the emigrants themselves, developed a love of frontier life, 
an ability to accommodate themselves to the new conditions await- 
ing pioneers, and how, regardless of race, the new generation 
-of whatever parentage, educated under these conditions, developed 
much along the same lines. At the time of the Revolution these 
common characteristics were so pronounced that we are apt to 
, regard the whole struggle as if dominated and conducted entirely 
by men of English ancestry. 

The prevalent idea is that the German contribution to our 
nation in colonial times consisted of a few thousand wretched 
Palatines and others of the same race and low social condition ; Miss 
Bittenger, somewhat bitterly, complains that the great historian 
Parkman, has called them " boors." The emigrants contained no 
larger proportion of the unprogressive, wretched peasantry than 
would be expected in so large a migration. They were, as a rule, 
better educated than contemporaneous emigrants from English 
speaking countries. A German newspaper was established as 
early as 1739 by Christopher Saur, and was followed by others, 



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a64 GERMAN MIGRa'tION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 

which attained a good circulation, an impossibility in an illiterate 
community. Saur printed the " Germantown Bible," the first 
edition of the Bible printed in America in a European lan- 
guage, in 1742. 

Schoolmasters are prominent in all the affairs of the German 
settlements. Emigrants made so by religious persecution are 
usually more energetic, more worthy of perpetuating their race 
and better capable of doing so, than those who are willing to 
accept what appears to them the inevitable, either from indolence 
or lack of spirit. Such emigrants would embrace in their ranks 
the better educated, those with ability to reason a way out of 
their difficulties, and with the determination to prevent a recur- 
rence of their troubles. Such was the case with the migrations of 
the Pilgrims and Puritans, of the Germans, and of the Scotch- 
Irish. 

It is with reo;ret that we note serious errors in Miss Bittencfer's 
romantic chapter on '' German Colonization in New England." 
They are of such a nature as to show that the author is 
unfamiliar with that portion of her theme. Samuel Waldo, mer- 
chant, soldier, and landed proprietor, was the means of bringing 
over the greater number of the German emigrants to New Eng- 
land. He was not of immediate German ancestry, if at all. The 
founder of the New England Waldo family was Cornelius, who 
came to this country from England, where the family was set- 
tled. A similar error is made in the description of Fryeburg, 
Me. The staunch Yankee, Joseph Frye, of a family settled in 
Andover, Massachusetts, for several generations, and whose Eng- 
lish home and ancestry are undisputed, would not relish being 
described as "Joseph Frey," leader of a band of Bernese emi- 
grants. Nor is it probable the descendants of the Rev. William 
Fessenden, descendant of another English emigrant of 1640, u'ill 
accept the well-meant effort of Miss Bittenger to make that 
worthy gentleman a child of a member of the same group of 
emigrants. 

Waldo docs not merit the severe criticism accorded him. The 
land titles of Maine were for generations the source of worry and 



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GERMAN MIGRATION TO AMERICAN COLONIES. 265 

perplexity to settler and proprietor alike. Nor were the few 
■German settlers the only sufFerers from the lack of validity of 
title. The evil of long standing was finally rectified by a legis- 
lative commission after a most careful examination. 

The German communities in New England were so weak, 
numerically, and the people so willing to extend to them every 
■opportunity to better their condition, that, as soon as the emi- 
grants had mastered the language and customs of the New Eng- 
enders, it was impossible and not wise to hold them in com- 
munities. That the settlements on Broad Bay and at Dresden 
retained so long their foreign characteristics was due rather to pecul- 
iar circumstances than to legislation or self-interest. The high 
standard of the German emii^rants in New EnMand doubtless 
contributed largely to their absorption into the English popula- 
tion, compared with which they were as a drop in the bucket. 

The bibliographies appended to both volumes are by no means 
their least valuable feature. That of Mr. Kuhns is the most sys- 
tematic. An especially valuable feature of Mr. Kuhn's work is 
the appendix devoted to Pennsylvania-German names and to the 
prominent characteristics of the dialect spoken by the descendants 
of the German and Swiss settlers. The explanation of deriva- 
tion of the German patronymics, and of the change which has 
taken place under the pressure of contact with non-Germans, 
- will prove of especial value to the genealogist and serve to impress 
the general reader with the force of the writer's claim that prob- 
ably 5,000,000 Americans of the present day descend from pre- 
revolutionary German stock. 

It would have been in better taste and more useful to the 
reader, if the copious quotations, with which Mr. Kuhn's footnotes 
abound, had been translated into English. In the majority of 
instances the force of his contrasts and deductions will be lost to 
the reader. 

Miss Bittenger and Mr. Kuhns have done much to make the 
claim of the German to an equal share with his brother colonist 
in that great work of welding a nation, whether of Scotch-Irish 
or English ancestry, not only better known but acknowledged. 



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NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN INFLUENCES IN 

THE niDDLE WEST. 



[An extract from "The Middle West," by Prof. F. J. Turner.*] 



The Frenchman had done but little fighting for this region. 
He swore brotherhood with its savages, traded with them, inter- 
married with them, and explored the Middle West ; but he left 
the wilderness much as he found it. Some six or seven thousand 
French people in all, about Detroit and Vincennes, and in the 
Illinois country, and scattered among the Indian villages of the 
remote lakes and streams, held possession when George Wash- 
ington reached the site of Pittsburg, bearing Virginia's summons 
of eviction to France. In his person fate knocked at-the por- 
tals of a " rising empire." France hurried her commanders and 
garrisons, with Indian allies, from the posts about the Great 
Lakes and the upper Mississippi ; but it was in vain. In vain, 
too, the aftermath of Pontiac's widespread Indian uprising against 
the English occupation. When she came into possession of the 
lands between the Ohio, the Mississippi, and the Great Lakes, 
England organized them as a part of the Province of Quebec. 
The daring conquest of George Rogers Clark left Virginia in 
military possession of the Illinois country at the conclusion of the 
Revolutionary War; but over all the remainder of the Old North- 
west, England was in control. Although she ceded the region by 
the treaty which closed the Revolution, she remained for many 
years the mistress of the Indians and the fur trade. When Lord 
Shelburne was upbraided in parliament for yielding the North- 
west to the United States, the complaint was that he had clothed 
the Americans " in the warm covering of our fur trade," and 
his defense was that the peltry trade of the ceded tract was not 
sufficiently profitable to warrant further war. But the English 



♦Reprinted by permission from The International Monthly for December, 

1901. 

266 



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^ - THE MIDDLE WEST. 267 

government became convinced that the Indian trade demanded the 
retention of the Northwest, and she did in fact hold her posts there 
in spite of the treaty of peace. Dundas, the English secretary for 
the colonies, expressed the policy, when he declared, in 1792, 
that the object was to interpose an Indian barrier between Can- 
ada and the United States, and in pursuance of this policy of 
preserving the Northwest as an Indian buffer State, the Cana- 
dian authorities supported the Indians in their resistance to 
American settlement beyond the Ohio. The conception of the 
Northwest as an Indian reserve strikingly exhibits England's 
inability to foresee the future of the region, and to measure the 
forces of American expansion. 

By the cessions of Virginia, New York, Massachusetts, and 
Connecticut, the Old Congress had come into nominal possession 
of an extensive public domain, and a field for the exercise of 
national authority. The significance of this fact in the develop- 
.ment of national power is not likely to be overestimated. The 
first result was the completion of the Ordinance of 1787, which 
provided a territorial government for the Old Northwest, with 
provisions for the admission of States into the Union. This fed- 
eral colonial system guaranteed that the new national possessions 
should not be governed as dependent provinces, but should enter 
as a group of sister States into the federation. While the import- 
ance of the article excluding slavery has often been pointed out, 
it is probable that the provisions for a federal colonial organiza- 
tion have been at least equally potential In our actual development. 
The full significance of this feature of th^ Ordinance is only 
appreciated when we consider its continuous influence upon the 
American territorial and State policy in the westward expansion 
to the Pacific, and the political preconceptions with which Ameri- 
cans approach the problems of government in the new insular 
possessions. The Land Ordinance of 1785 is also worthy or 
• attention in this connection, for under its provisions almost all of 
the Middle West has been divided by the government surveyor 
into rectangles of sections and townships, by whose lines the set- 
tler has been able easily and certainly to locate his farm, and the 



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2 68 THE MIDDLE WEST. 

forester his ''forty." In the local organization of the Middle 
West these lines have played an important part. 

It would be impossible within the limits of this paper to detail 
the history of the occupation of the Middle West ; but the 
larger aspects of the flow of population into the region may be 
sketched. Alassachusetts men had formed the Ohio Company, 
and had been influential in shaping the liberal provisions of the 
Ordinance. Their land purchase, paid for in soldiers' certifi- 
cates, embraced an area larger than the ^State of Rhode Island. 
At Marietta in 1788, under the shelter of Fort Harmar, their 
bullet-proof barge, the " Mayflower," landed the first colony. 
A New Jersey colony was planted in the same year at Cincinnati 
in the Symmes Purchase. Thus American civilization crossed 
the Ohio. The French settlements at Detroit and in Indiana and 
Illinois belonged to other times and had other ideals ; but with 
the entrance of the American pioneer into the forest of the Mid- 
dle West, a new era began. The Indians, with the moral sup- 
• port of England, resisted the invasion, and an Indian war fol- 
■ lowed. The conquest of Wayne, in 1795, pushed back the 
Indians to the Greenville line, extending irregularly across the 
State of Ohio from the site of Cleveland to Fort Recovery in the 
middle point of her present western boundary, and secured cer- 
tain areas in Indiana. In the same period Jay's treaty provided 
for the withdrawal of the British posts. After this extension of 
the area open to the pioneer, new settlements were rapidly 
formed. Connecticut disposed of her reserved land about Lake 
Erie to companies, and in 1796 General Moses Cleaveland led 
the way to the site of the city that bears his name. This was 
the beginning of the occupation of the Western Reserve, a dis- 
trict about as large as the parent State of Connecticut, a New Eng- 
land colony in the Middle West, which has maintained, even to the 
present time, the impress of New England traits. Virginia and 
Kentucky settlers sought the Virginia Military Bounty Lands, 
and the foundation of Chillicothe here, in 1796, afforded a cen- 
tre for Southern settlement. The region is a modified extension 
of the limestone area of Kentucky, and naturally attracted the 






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THE MIDDLE WEST. 269 

emigrants from the Blue Grass State. Ohio's history is deeply 
marked by the interaction of the New England, Middle, and 
Southern colonies within her borders. 

By the opening of the nineteenth century, when Napoleon's 
cession brought to the United States the vast spaces of the 
Louisiana Purchase beyond the Mississippi, the pioneers had 
hardly more than entered the outskirts of the forest along the 
Ohio and Lake Erie. But by 18 10 the government had 
extinguished the Indian title to the unsecured portions of the 
Western Reserve, and to great tracts of Indi^ana, along the 
Ohio and up the Wabash Valley; thus protecting the Ohio high- 
way from the Indians, and opening new lands to settlement. 
The embargo had destroyed the trade of New England, and had 
weighted down her citizens with debt and taxation ; caravans of 
Yankee emigrant wagons, precursors of the "prairie schooner," 
had already begun to cross Pennsylvania on their way to Ohio; 
and they now greatly increased in number. North Carolina 
back countrymen flocked to the Indiana settlements, giving the 
peculiar Hoosier flavor to the State, and other Southerners fol- 
lowed, outnumbering the Northern immigrants, who sought the 
eastern edge of Indiana. Tecumthe' and his people, rendered 
desperate by the advance into their hunting grounds, took up the 
hatchet, made wide-reaching alliances among the Indians, and 
turned to England for protection. The Indian war merged into 
the War of 18 12, and the settlers strove in vain to add Cana- 
dian lands to their empire. In the diplomatic negotiations that 
followed the war, England made another attempt to erect the Old 
Northwest beyond the Greenville line into a permanent Indian 
barrier between Canada and the United States; but the demand 
was refused, and by the treaties of 18 18, the Indians were pressed 
still farther north. In the meantime, Indian treaties had released 
additional land in southern Illinois, and pioneers were widening 
the bounds of the old French settlements. Avoiding the rich 
savannas of the prairie regions, as devoid of wood, remote from 
transportation facilities, and suited only to grazing, they entered 
the hard woods — and in the early twenties they were advancing 



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t-jo THE MIDDLE WEST. 

in a wedge shaped column up the Illinois Valley. The Southern 
element constituted the main portion of this phalanx of axe- 
bearers. Abraham Lincoln's father had joined the throng of 
Kentuckians that entered the Indiana woods in 1816, and the 
boy, when he had learned to hew out a forest home, betook him- 
self, in 1830, to Sangamon County, Illinois. He represents the 
pioneer of the period ; but his axe sank deeper than other men's, 
and the plaster cast of his great sinewy hand, at Washington, 
embodies the training of these frontier railsplitters,in the days when 
Fort Dearborn, on the site of Chicago, was but a military outpost in 
a desolate country. While the hard woods of Illinois were being 
entered, the pioneer movement passed also into the Missouri 
Valley. The French lead miners had already opened the south- 
eastern section, and Southern mountaineers had pushed up the 
Missouri; but now the planters from the Ohio Valley and the 
upper Tennessee followed, seeking the alluvial soils for slave 
labor. Moving across the southern border of free Illinois, they 
had awakened regrets in that State at the loss of so large a body 
of settlers. 

Looking at the Middle West, as a whole, in the decade from 
1810 to 1820, we perceive that settlement extended from the 
shores of Lake Erie in an arc, following the banks of the Ohio till 
it joined the Mississippi, and thence along that river and up the 
Missouri well into the centre of the State. The next decade 
was marked by the increased use of the steamboat ; pioneers 
pressed farther up the streams, etching out the hard wood forests 
well up to the prairie lands, and forming additional tracts of 
settlement in the region tributary to Detroit and in the south- 
eastern part of Michigan. In the area of the Galena lead mines 
of northwestern Illinois, southwestern Wisconsin, and northeast- 
ern Iowa, Southerners had already begun operations ; and if we 
except Ohio and Michigan, the dominant element in all this 
overflow of settlement into the A4iddle West was Southern, 
particularly from Kentucky, Virginia, and North Carolina. The 
settlements were still dependent on the rivers for transportation, 
and the areas between the rivers were but lightly occupied. The 



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THE MIDDLE WEST. - 271 

Mississippi constituted the principal outlet for the products of 
the Middle West ; Pittsburg furnished most of the supplies for 
the region, but New Orleans received its crops. The Old 
National road was built piecemeal, and too late, as a whole, to 
make a great artery of trade throughout the Middle West, in this 
€arly period ; but it marked the northern borders of the Southern 
stream of population, running, as this did, through Columbus, 
Indianapolis, and Vandalia. 

The twenty years from 1830 to 1850 saw great changes in the 
composition of the population of the Middle West. The open- 
ing of the Erie Canal in 1825 was an epoch-making event. It 
furnished a new outlet and inlet for northwestern traffic ; Buffalo 
began to grow, and New York City changed from a local mar- 
ket to a great commercial centre. But even more important was 
the place which the canal occupied as the highway for a new 
migration. In the march of the New England people from the 
coast, three movements are of especial importance : the advance 
from the seaboard up the Connecticut and Housatonic Valleys 
through Massachusetts and into Vermont ; the advance thence 
to central and western New York ; and the advance to the 
interior of the Old Northwest. The second of these stages 
occupied the generation from about 1790 to 1820; after that 
the second generation was ready to seek new lands ; and these 
-the Erie Canal and lake navigation opened to them, and to the 
Vermonters and other adventurous spirits of New England. ^ It 
was this combined New York-New England stream that in the 
thirties poured in large volume into the zone north of the settlements 
which have been described. The newcomers filled in the south- 
ern counties of Michigan and Wisconsin, the northern counties 
of Illinois, and parts of the northern and central areas of Indi- 
ana. Pennsylvania and Ohio sent a similar type of people to the 
area adjacent to those States. In Iowa a stream, which combined 
a Southern element with these settlers, sought the wooded tribu- 
taries of the Mississippi in the southeastern part of the State. In 
default of legal authority, in this early period, they formed squat- 
ter governments and land associations, comparable to the action 



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of the Massachusetts men who in the first quarter of the seven- 
teenth century "squatted" in the Connecticut Valley. 

A great forward movement had occurred, which took pos- 
session of oak openings and prairies, gave birth to the cities 
of Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, and Minneapolis, as well as 
to a multitude of lesser cities, and replaced the dominance 
of the Southern element by that of a modified Puritan stock. 
The railroad system of the early fifties bound the Mississippi to 
the North Atlantic seaboard ; New Orleans gave way to New 
York as the outlet for the Middle West, ana the day of river set- 
tlement was succeeded by the era of inter-river settlement and 
railway transportation. The change in the political and social 
ideals was at least equal to the change in economic connections, 
and together these forces made an intimate organic union between 
New England, New York, and the newly settled West. In esti- 
mating the New England influence in the Middle West, it must 
not be forgotten that the New York settlers were mainly New 
Englanders of a later generation. 

Combined with the streams from the East came the German 
migration into the Middle West. Over half a million, mainly 
from the Palatinate, Wiirtemberg, and the adjacent regions, 
sought America between 1830 and 1850, and nearly a million 
more Germans came in the next decade. The larger portion of 
these went into the Middle West ; they became pioneers in the 
' newer parts of Ohio, especially along the central ridge, and in 
Cincinnati ; they took up the hard wood lands of the Wisconsin 
counties along Lake Michigan ; and they came in important 
numbers to Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan, and to the 
river towns of Iowa. In Wisconsin and Missouri their numbers 
were such that enthusiasts dreamed of establishing in the one or 
the other a German State. The migration in the thirties and 
forties contained an exceptionally large proportion of educated 
and forceful leaders, men who had struggled in vain for 
the ideal of a liberal German nation, and who contributed 
important intellectual forces to the communities in which they 
settled. The Germans, as a whole, furnished a conservative and 



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THE MIDDLE WEST. 273 

thrifty agricultural element to the Middle West. In some of 
their social ideals they came Into collision with the Puritan ele- 
ment from New England, and the outcome of the steady contest 
has been a compromise. Of all the States, Wisconsin has been 
most deeply influenced by the Germans. 



I 



A*,, • 






."^".:m{ 



THE STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY.* 



Mr. J. H. Benton, Jr., has recently printed in beautiful form 
a history of the Benton family. He says, in an introductory 
paragraph, filling the place and office of a preface : — 

*' The preparation of this volume has been the recreation of 
hours taken from a busy life. It was at first intended to be a 
tribute to the memory of grandparents, but has so far outgrown 
the original design that it may, perhaps, be called the Story of 
a New England Family." 

It is an interesting relation of the career of an humble family, 
essentially farmers, through seven generations of New England 
life in the valleys of the Connecticut and the Naugatuck. 
Thoroughly rustic, typical, industrious, sincere, and modest, the 
first three generations clung to the soil. It achieved in the third 
generation the distinction of a deacon in the standing order of 
New England Congregationalism. Footing thus obtained, pub- 
lic recognition came in useful stations, as town clerk, town 
treasurer, selectman, and, after filling other official positions in 
the gift of the town, deputy to the General Assembly of the 
Province of Connecticut. 

The fourth generation, the deacon's son, was early a lister 
and rate maker and " Quorester to tune the Salms in this 
society, and," the town voted, *' that Amos Benton shall tune the 
same in Jacob Benton's absence." He then became lieutenant in 
the militia. He embarked in trade and, in partnership with his 
brother, kept the village store. The brothers were unsuccessful 
and insolvent, before the opening of the American revolution. 

*Samuel Slade Benton, His Ancestors and Descendants. By Josiah Henry Benton, Jr., 
1620- 1 90 1. Privately Printed. The Merrymount Press, Boston, 190 1. I vol. 8vo., 

PP- 354- 

274 



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STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 275 

Discouraged and impoverished he emigrated, in the winter of 
1782-3 with his household goods and the " Great Bible," and 
resumed a farmer's life at Alstead, N. H., higher up the Con- 
necticut River where land was cheaper and better. 

Here, aided by his faithful wife, Hannah, and a family of five 
children ranging from five to twenty-one years, he started life 
anew. His brother-in-law, John Slade, was a prominent man at 
Alstead and this may account for Benton's choice of that town 
as a residence. The sons went still farther up the Connecticut. 

It was about twenty years before the advent of the stage-coach 
into this part of New Hampshire, and, although possibly he 
pulled his way by flatboat up the Connecticut, it is probable that 
Jacob Benton made the journey w^ith his own team, which was 
very likely a cart drawn by a pair of those slow and patient 
animals, oxen, and that much of the distance was traveled on 
foot. Probably he followed the course of the Connecticut River 
as far as Rockingham, Vermont, where the Connecticut River 
road was intersected by the road from Boston. Here he left the 
river and following the main highway, which still traverses the 
length of " Walpole Valley" so-called, reached his destination, 
the home of the Slades very near the summit of the Alstead hills. 
To that curious and inhospitable custom of *' warning out," 
practised at that period by towns in New Hampshire, we owe 
'the official record of his arrival. In the records of Alstead it is 
written that the selectmen required Saml. Kidder, one of the 
constables of Alstead " forthwith to warn Jacob Benton and 
Hannah his wife, Mable, Jacob, Reynold, Mary, and Samuel 
Benton, their children to Depart out of this Town Immediately 
and no longer make it their place of Residence under the pains 
that will follow," and that Saml. Kidder "served this warrant 
by reading the same in the hearing of sd. persons." Unkind as 
this warning seemed, it was a matter of form and for some years 
was served upon all newcomers within a year of their arrival 
to prevent their becoming town charges in the possible event of 
their future poverty. He remained a few years in Alstead and 
then settled in Rockingham, just across the Connecticut River, 
his wife Hannah was admitted to the church there Sept. 10, 
17S6, and he Sept. 4, 1791, both by letter from Harwinton, and 






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276 STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 

here they spent their remaining years and at last were laid to 
rest in the unmarked graves in the cemetry connected with the 
ancient church. 

We have dwelt at some length upon this " Hegira" of Jacob 
Benton and his family, because it is the keynote of the book and 
marked the beginning of a new and better era in the fortunes of 
the Benton family. Without it the children of Jacob Benton 
would not have been pioneers and leaders in towns in northern 
New Hampshire and Vermont, honored in Church and State, 
and presumably this memorial would not have been written. 
Samuel Slade Benton, ^vho was warned out of Alstead with the 
other children in 17S3, was the youngest child of Jacob and 
Hannah Benton, was born in Harwinton, Conn., April 27, i777? 
and died in Newbury, Vt., Dec. 15, 1857. He it is whom his 
faithful grandson has chosen as the hero or central figure of his 
book from whom he reckons backward and forward, *^ Samuel 
Slade Benton, his Ancestors and Descendants." The Bentons 
before Samuel Slade are of interest because they culminated in 
him ; the Bentons after Samuel Slade look back to him as their 
honored progenitor. Jacob, Senior, of Harwinton and Hart- 
ford, his father Samuel of Hartford, and his grandfather 
Andrew of Milford and Hartford, the emigrant, are all carefully 
and fully traced through town, church, and state records and all 
possible light is thrown upon their histories. In spite of all 
research their figures loom rather misty in the remote distance, 
barring a certain vitality in Jacob Benton, Sr., and the human 
interest of the volume begins with Jacob, Jr., his misfortunes 
in trade and his brave journey to new fields to mend his fortunes 
-on the northern frontier. 

Samuel Slade Benton and their families: of Elizabeth, who 
remained in Harwinton and married Silas Gridley ; of Mabel, 
who married Jonathan Watts and after his death John Worcester, 
of Alstead, N. H. ; of Jacob, who never married but was a 
large-hearted, prosperous man and the good genius of the 
family, making visits of mercy to his brothers and sisters in time 
of trouble, and becoming a man of mark and substance in 
Waterford and St. Johnsbury, Vt. ; of Reynold, who settled in 
Hartford, of which his son Charles became mayor in 1862 ; of 



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STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 277 

Chauncey, an eccentric character who was left behind at the 
time of the " Hegira" and became a resident of Hartford ; and 
of Mary, an excellent, godly woman, the wife of Deacon Samuel 
Kingbury, of Alstead and later of Amherst, Mass. 

In the next generation, the toil of a century and a half began 
to bear fruit. The thrifty and hard-working man, with his 
inheritance of honest principles from generations, so managed 
the good soil of the Connecticut intervale, that he became 
*' forehanded," as the wealthy are termed in that country. Like 
his grandfathers, he became useful and important in the govern- 
ment of the town, and ^vent to the legislature and the Constitu- 
tional Convention as its representative. He was evidently a man 
of aflairs. His character may be gathered from his record in the 
General Assembly, where the journal shows he voted at every 
call of the yeas and nays. 

The next generation made the first move West and left the 
valley of the Connecticut for the valley of the Passumpsic. 
Their farm ultimatelv became the site of the Fairbanks Scale 
Works. The prosperity of the family continued and this good 
citizen, who lived to see railroads and steamboats, in the year 
previous to his death, when seventy-nine years of age, made a 
trip to Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Chicago, where several 
of his sons had settled. One of these sons became a judge; 
another graduated at Amherst College, was ordained, and became 
a missionary ; another became a lawyer and a general in the 
^ militia, and twice a member of Congress ; another was a success- 

I ful schoolmaster, and, at the close of the second century of the 

I family in America, was licensed as an Orthodox minister in 

Vermont, whence he was called to Michigan. This octogena- 
rian is yet living and enjoying good health. His son, the author 
of this volume, is the well-known and well-regarded attorney 
for the Consolidated Railroad Company, with his office in 
Boston. 

In the early history of this family, the struggle of life was to 
'wring out of the bare soil subsistence for themselves and the 
dozen children who gathered at the hearthstone. Everything 
had to be produced, food, clothing, instruction. There was 
little or no money in circulation. Fortunately, there was always 



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278 STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 

enough to eat, the yield of the farm. The skins of the animals 
used for food, the peltry of the game trapped and shot in hunt- 
ing, were carefully tanned in home pits, with bark from native 
trees. The fleeces of the sheep were^ yearly clipped, spun into 
yarn, and woven into homespun for dresses, or into linseys for 
male garments. The boys wore 

caps of coon, with the red fox lined, 

Like a bee-hive shaped, with the tail behind. 
That flap'd o'er their backs in the saucy wind. 

During the 'winters, brief terms of schooling in the little red 
schoolhouse enabled them to read, to write, and to cipher. 
More was unnecessary and beyond their needs. 

Such evolution, the farm, the country store, again the farm, 
the town officers, and the politician, has resulted in the useful 
men of today, in New England and in the West. This history 
is but a counterpart of hundreds. Again and again. New Eng- 
land has given the West, the seat of coming power, of her very 
best. The cowhide boots of the provincial period, with other 
coarse clothing, have given place to the elegant footwear and 
graceful garments of today. And this elegant book, a sample 
of beautiful printing, is an evidence of this evolution. In the 
preceding generations it could have been produced by neither. 

The importance of a family history is unaffected by the 
relative wealth or influence possessed by its members. Succes- 
sive generations arise, flourish, and depart, utterly unconscious 
of the part they perform in producing the sample of a later 
generation. Ordinarily a youth, or newly married couple, 
lands, after a hard voyage, on the shores of the western continent. 
He may' have had antecedents of station or of nobility ; most 
probably not. In either event, he disregards them and casts in 
his lot with his fellow men to subdue the wilderness and develop 
the soil on which he treads. He clears a piece of land, builds a 
log hut, cultivates his farm, and raises a family. As old age 
approaches, he seeks to place his sons and daughters in better 
positions to fight the battle of life than he himself enjoyed ; and, 
as conditions have improved, he usually succeeds. The race 
marches forward and the past is forgotten. Imperfect and 
unequal memoranda is kept of the passing hour. To improve 



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STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 279 

the farm, enlarge the flocks and herds, becomes the lot of each 
successive generation. Such has been the ordinary course of 
family history in New England. To the industrious the soil has 
yielded a good living, and sometimes a surplus. In the institu- 
tions which the race have established, as they found occasion, 
the family share ; and successive generations improve in 
knowledge, often in wealth and importance, over their predeces- 
sors, their progenitors. 

How this has been accomplished in one family is chronicled in 
this handsomely printed book. It is in no sense a genealogy only. 
The emigrant, Andrew Benton, appears among the free planters 
of Milford, Conn., who, in 1639, established themselves on the 
shores of the Sound as a body politic, intent upon managing its 
own affairs and selecting its own officers, without let or hind- 
rance, and without intrusion or menace to others. They devise 
a court to punish offenders against the public weal or the public 
conscience. They thus enter upon home rule and call their 
young republic, jSIilford. The first generation of Bentons were 
born thercv save the youngest. Increasing cares and needs, and 
perhaps the influence of a second wife, cause a removal in 
twenty-five years to Hartford, where the emigrant dies after a 
fifty years' residence in the New World. 

Hartford and Windsor had each been granted settlements 
westerly, on the Naugatuck. Here, after an incipient rebellion, 
the jailing of the ringleaders at Hartford and their forcible release 
by the populace, further contention was waived, and the terri- 
tories joined in one town, called Harwinton, to perpetuate the 
first syllable in the name of each parent. To Harwinton the 
Bentons go in the third generation, and are prominent in the 
religious element of the plantation. In this town was their chief 
residence for the remaining provincial days. The hills swell 
back from the river to commanding elevations, well adapted 
to grazing, which became with the constant support of the 
family the leading business. The town lay on the great highway 
from Hartford to the only " Western lands " known at that day. 
The early stage-coach gave the town an importance not since 
enjoyed, and distinguished travelers. Gen. Washington, Gen. 
Lafayette, Count de Rochambeau, Admiral de Tcrnay, tarried 



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:28o STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 

and refreshed at the Harwinton Inn. This third generation of 
Bentons was represented in Deacon Benton, as early as 1732, 
about a hundred years from Andrew Benton's arrival at Milford. 
A school was established within the first ten years, and a Benton 
served on the committee to provide schoolmaster and school- 
mistress, two months in the year being given to the master, and 
the balance at " the Discressionof the Commity to Lay out upon 
School Dames." In i743? ^ schoolhouse vras built and Deacon 
Benton was chairman of the committee to " see to ye building 
and finishing." The town meetings were often held at the 
*' hous of Jacob Benton." From Harwinton, after a century 
has elapsed from the arrival of Andrew Benton, a Benton is sent 
-to the provincial legislature ; as, after another century and a third 
has closed, a Benton represents a sovereign State in the federal 
■Congress. 

The compilation of such a book is no small task. The bibli- 
ography shows the examination and a study of sixty public 
records, nineteen church records, eighteen town histories, nine 
genealogies, two biographies, and forty-three volumes of news- 
papers and unclassified books. Only the possessor of an histori- 
cal spirit and antiquarian zeal would voluntarily undergo the 
toil of its accomplishment ; though the fascination of a search 
through the sparse records in large measure repays and increases 
the attention and devotion. The after arrangement of material 
and construction of the book is genuine toil. The system 
adopted by Mr. Benton, in this instance, is the selection of a 
central ancestor and the individual treatment of that one's ances- 
tors and his descendants, with their children. The sketches of 
the heads of the several generations are followed by similar 
sketches of each member of his family, sons and daughters alike. 
The work is thus preserved from the dry and uninteresting 
character of a genealogy, and partakes of that of a series of short 
stories. Wills, inventories, titles, and deeds of land conveyance, 
lists of baptisms and church admissions, dates of marriages and 
deaths, are carefully copied, in their quaint language and spell- 
ings, and freely interspersed with the narrative, which is 
generously illustrated with half-tone cuts of residences, land- 
scapes, portraits, and, in one case, a facsimile of the first page 



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STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND FAMILY. 281 

of the first book of Harwinton tov/^n records. Arguments in 
public life, correspondence in the family, graveyard inscriptions, 
and facsimiles of autographs abound throughout the book, which 
is thus manifolded in value to the surviving kinsmen. It cer- 
tainly is unique. After repeated perusal v^e lay it dow^n with a 
happy sense of gratification at what seems to be personal 
acquaintance with not only an interesting, but a worthy family. 
With the exhibition of a series of coat armor, reproduced in 
colors, borne in England by Bentons, the book closes with a 
copious and comprehensive index of names and topics. 



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NEW LONDON, CONN., EARLY RECORDS 
/Copied from the Original Record*). 



1644. 
Hannah, dau. of James Avery and Joana, 11 Oct. 

1646. 
James, son of James and Joana Avery, b. 15 Dec. 

1647. 
Manassa, son of Thomas and Grace Miner, b. 28 April. 

1648. 
Mary, of James and Joan Avery, 19 Feb. 
Ann, of Thomas and Grace Miner, b. 28 April. 

1651. 

Mary, of Thomas and Grace Miner, 5 May. 
Thomas, of James and Joane Avery, b 6 May. 

1652. 
Ann, dau. of Thomas and Grace Miner, b. 13 Aug. 
Samuel, son of Thomas and Grace Miner, 4 March. 
John Prentice, son of John and Hester, 6 Aug. 
Elizabeth, dau. of George and Margary Tongue, b. 20 Oct. 
Mary Roberts, dau. of Hugh and Mary, 9 Dec. 

1653. 
Barbery, wife of Andrew Lister, d. 2 Feb. 
Samuel, son of William and Sarah Hough, 9 March. 

* Evidently compiled after 1660. 

282 






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NEW LONDON, CONN., EARLY RECORDS. 283 

George, son of George and Margary Chapell, 18 March. 
John, son of James and Joane Avery, b 10 Feb. 

1654. 

Hannah, dau. of George and Margery Tongue, b. 20 July. 
Walter, father of Gabryell Harris, d. 6 Nov. 
Walter, son of Gabryell Harris, b. 24 Nov.; d. Dec. 
Elizabeth, dau. of Peeter and Elizabeth Bradley, b. 16 March. 

1655. 

Joseph, son of John and Hester Prentice, b. 2 April. 
Thomas Bayley, m. Lydia, dau. of James Redfin, 20 Jan. 
Hannah Meades, dau. of William and Rebecca, b. 27 Aug. 
Hannah, dan. of Thomas and Grace Miner, b. 15 Sept. 
John, son of William and Sarah Hough, b. 17 Oct. 
Mary Harris, v/ife of Walter, d. 24 Jan. 
Capt. John Hough, d. 26 Aug., 17 15. 

1656. 

Samuel, son of William and Sarah Hough, born in another 
place. (See below.) ■ 

Sam'l, son of Hugh and Mary Roberts, 25 April. 
Elizabeth, dau. of Gabriel and Mary Harris, 5 June. 
Elizabeth, dau. of George and Margary Chappell, 30 Aug. 
Rebecca, dau. of Jas. and Joane Avery, 6 Oct. 
Mary, dau. of Thos. and Lydia Bayley, 14 Feb. 
John Pickett, son of John and Ruth, 25 July. 

1657. 

Jona, son of John and Hester Prentice, 15 July. 
Wm. Boston, of London, m. Cathrin Crow, of London, 3 Aug. 
Mary, dau. of George and Margaret Tongue, b. 17 Sept. 
William, son of William and Sarah Hough, b. 17 Oct. 

1658. 

Thomas, son of Thomas and Lydia Bayley, b. 5 March. 
Mehitable, dau. of Hugh and Mary Roberts, 15 April. 
George, son of George and Margaret Tongue, 8 May. 



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a84 NEW LONDON, CONN., EARLY RECORDS. 

Jona, son of James and Joane Avery, 5 Jan. 
Thomas, son of Gabriel and Mary Harris, b. 19 July. 
Peter, son of Peter and Elizabeth Bradley, b. 7 Sept. 
Adam, son of John and Ruth Picket, 15 Nov. 
George Geares m. Sarah, dau. of Robert Allen, 17 Feb. 

1659. 

John Coits, husband of Mary, d. 29 Aug. 

Joshua Raymond, son of Richard, of Salem, m. Elizabeth, 
dau. of Nehemiah Smith, 10 Dec. 

Jona, son of William and Sarah Hough, 7 Feb. 

Daniel, son of Wm. Wetherell, clergyman of Scituate in New 
England, m. Grace, dau. of Jona and Grace Brewster, of New 
London, 4 Aug, 

Hannah, dau. of Daniel and Grace Wetherell, 21 March. 

Sarah Geares, dau. of George and Sarah, b. 27 Feb. 

1660. 

Neh*"^, son of Robert Roger, m. Hannah, dau. of James 
Morgan, 20 Nov. 

Heaster, dau. of John and Heaster Prentice, b. 20 July. 
Joshua, son of Joshua and Elizabeth Raymond, 18 Sept. 
Peter, son of Gabriel and Mary Harris, b. 8 Dec. 
Mary, dau. of John and Ruth Pickett, 16 Jan. 

1661. 

John Bayley, son of Thomas and Lydia, b. April. 
Christopher, son of James and Joane Avery, b. 30 April. 
John Keyney, son of William Keyney, m. Sarah, dau. of 
William Douglas, Oct. 

Thomas Roach m. Rebecca Redfin, 12 Dec. 

John Bourden m. Sarah, dau. of William Hough, 11 Feb. 

1662. 

Hester, dau. of George and Margaret Chappell, 15 April. 
Elizabeth, dau. of Joshua and Ehzabeth Raymond, b. 24 May. 
Tymothy, son of Andrew and Anne Lester, b. 4 July. 



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NEW LONDON, CONN., EARLY RECORDS. 285 

Susanna, dau. of John and Sarah Keyney, 6 Sept. 

Deborah, dau. of William and Sarah Hough, 21 Oct. 

Samuel, son of James Rogers, m. to Mary, dau. of Thomas 
Stanton, 25 Nov. 

Hugh Mould, of Barnstable, m. Martha, dau. of Jonathan 
Coite, 1 1 June. 

Jona, son of George and Sarah Geares, 26 May. 

1663. 

Robert, son of Robert and Ann Lattemore, b. 5 Feb. 

John, son of John Stebbins,m. Deborah, dau. of , 8 May. 

■ Peter, son of John and Hester Prentice, b. 31 July. 
Susanna, dau. of Hugh and Martha Mould, b. 2 April. 
John, son of Gabriel and Mary Harris, 12 June. 
Edw. Smith, son of New London, m. Elizabeth, dau. of 
"Thomas Bliss, of Norwidge, 7 June. 

1664. 

William, son of Thomas and Lydia Bayley, b. 27 April. 

Ann, dau. of Joshua and Elizabeth Raymond, b. 12 May. 

Joseph, son of Andrew and Ann Lester, 15 June. 

Samuel, son of James and Joane Avery, 14 Aug. 

Deborah, dau. of John and Deborah Stebins, 8 Oct. 

Samuel Starr m. Hannah, dau. of Jon. Brewster, 23 Dec. 

John Daniel m. Mary, dau. of George Chappell, 19 Jan. 

Dynah, dau. of Richard and Bertha Dart, b. 13 Jan. 

James Haynes, son of Charles and ( Mary * ) Haynes, b. I 

March. 

Elizabeth, dau. of Edw. and Elizabeth Smith, b. 16 Aug. 

Joseph Geares, son of George Geares, born by wife Sarah, at 

Nahantick, 14 Oct. 

1665. 

Robert, son of William Douglas, m. Mary, dau. of Robert 

Hempstead, 28 Sept. 

Ann, dau. of Edw. and Elizabeth Smith, b. 25 Oct. 



♦ "Mary" supplied in pencil on record. 



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a86 NEW LONDON, CONN., EARLY RECOPvDS. 

John Morgan, son of James, m. Rachel Dyman, i6 Nov. 

Samuel, son of Samuel and Hannah Starr, b. 1 1 Dec. 

John, son of John and Mary Danyal, b. 19 Jan. 

Sarah, dau. of George and Margaret Chappell, b. 14 Feb.; d. 
24 Nov., 1760. 

Abigail Hough, dau. of William and Sarah, b. 7 March. 
. Thomas, son of John Foster, of Kingsware, m. Susanna, dau. 
of Ralph Parker, 27 March. 

Mary, dau. of Hugh and Martha Mould, b. 26 July. 

Hannah, dau. of George and Sarah Geares, b. 27 Feb. 

Samuel, son of Gabriel Harris, b. 14 July. (See below.) 

1666. : 

Daniel Dart, son of Richard and Bethiah, b. 3 May. . . 

Samuel, son of Gabriel and Mary Harris, b. 14 July. 

James, son of Thomas and Lydia Bayley, b. 26 Sept. 

William, son of Robert and Mary Douglas, b. 1 1 Nov. 

James, son of James Morgan, m. Mary Vine, of Old England, 
sometime in November. 

Stephen, son of John and Hester Prentice, b. 26 Dec. 

Samuel, son of Robert Rogers, m. Hannah, dau. of Josia 
Churchwood, of Weathersfield, 9 Jan. 

Susanna, dau. of Thomas and Susanna Foster, 4 March. 

John Stebins, son of John and Debora, b. 1 1 Feb. 

Joseph, son of Clement and Francis Miner, b. 6 Aug. 

1667. 

Mary, dau. of Samuel and Mary Rogers, b. 17 April. 

Richard, son of Richard and Bertha Dart, b. 7 May. 

John, son of John and Rachel Morgan, b. 18 June. 

Joseph, son of John and Martha Coite, m. Martha, dau. of 
William Harris, of Weathersfield, 17 July. 

Anne, dau. of William and Sarah Hough, b. 29 Aug. 

Mary, dau. of John and Mary Daniel, 12 Oct. 

Dennis Springer, of Ireland, m. Mary Hudson, of London, in 
Old England, in October. 



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NEW LONDON, CONN., EARLY RECORDS. 287 

Elizabeth, dau. of Robert and Ann Lattemore, b. 14 Nov. 

William, son of William Douglas, m. Abigail, dau. of Wil- 
liam Hough, 18 Dec. 

James, son of James and Mary Morgan, 6 Feb. 

Mary, dau. of Gabriel and Mary Harris, b. 12 May. 

Hugh, son of Hugh and Mary Mould, b. Oct. 

Alexander Pygan, of Norwich, Old England, m. Judith, dau. 
of William Rediin, of New London, 17 June, 1668. 



QUERIES. 

Wanted. — The parents of Nancy Dixon, born in Plainfield, 
Connecticut, January 23, 1762, who married Capt. Shubial 
Browne, September 2, 17S2, at Brooklyn, Conn. She is called 
the adopted neice of Capt. Andrew ISIurdock (or Moredick) in 
his will. No record of her birth can be found in Plainfield. 
The above record is from the family Bible. Mr. Oscar J. Har- 
vey, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., in his very full account of the Dixon 
family of Windham County, has failed to unearth her connec- 
tion with the other branches. (This study is to be found in his 
** Harvey Book.") As the Dixon family is a well known and 
widely connected clan, it is possible that this information has 
been preserved by some member. Should this fall under the 
eye of such, notice of it will be appreciated. Address, G. I. 
Broavne, Bellefonte, Pa. 

Wanted. — The line of Riverius Camp, born in 175^ 5 mar- 
ried Huldah Clarke, October 10, 1775; died in New Milford, 
Conn., in 1S24. Olcutt, in his '* History of New Milford " 
Genealogical Notes, begins one line of the family from him. 
The Camp ancestry has been well studied in more than one of 
its branches. It is possible that some one is in possession of 
data which would connect him either with the Milford or 
Norwalk Camps. It is not likely that he sprang from an 
independent emigrant. Address, George I. Browne, Belle- 
fonte, Pa. 



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BOOK NOTES. 



Authors and publishers are requested to direct books sent for notice, to the Editor, 49 
North Prospect St., Burlington, Vermont. The space for a brief notice of any worthy- 
publication is gladly given, as there is no doubt that in this manner many special publications 
are brought to the attention of purchasers. Publishers are requested to state the price .of 
publication. 

A Comprehensive Method of Arrangement of Genea- 
logical Records, By Frank W. Haskell. Niagara Falls, 1900. 
Printed for the author. 

The generally accepted method of genealogical arrangement 
is that followed by the editor of the " New England Historical 
Genealogical Register." The difficulty met with in adopting a 
hard and fast system of notation has evoked many suggestions 
as to methods of overcoming the difficulty of introducing into 
any general scheme, at a late date, a family recently located. 
In. many cases the disturbance in genealogical succession is so 
great that either the new group is relegated to an appendix or 
the whole collection renumbered. 

One method of overcoming this difficulty was used in the 
Libby genealogy, and, especially for temporary arrangement, is 
excellent. It was recently used in this magazine in the Mansur 
genealogy. Mr. Haskell's method is similar, modified by the 
use of symbols. The system he advocates for an ancestral 
numeration is based upon the first plan. The use of such a sys- 
tem for a similar purpose we believe is unknown. The author 
will furnish any inquirer with a copy of the pamphlet. 

The Genealogy of Samuel and John Bishop, Brothers. 

Bishop Genealogy from 1636. By Henry F. Bishop. New 

York, 1901. pp. 43. 

288 






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BOOK NOTES. . 2g9 

Five years ago, Mr. Nathaniel Holmes Bishop contributed to 
iihis magazine a series of articles on the Bishop families of Con- 
necticut. In Vol. VI., pp. 239-271, will be found an exhaus- 
tive account of Thomas Bishop, of Ipswich, the founder of the 
family, together with information relating to his brothers, his 
sons, grandsons, and other interesting details, gathered from 
original sources in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecti- 
•cut. Much was printed for the first time ; all statements were 
fully authenticated. The primary object was to show the origin 
of the Norwich branch of the family. In spite of this Mr. H. 
F. Bishop has made but the most superficial use of this exhaus- 
tive study of the origin of the family. Doubtless from the fourth 
generation to date this pamphlet will prove of value, but for data 

i concerning Samuel and John Bishop and their ancestry and con- 

nections the reader should refer to Mr. N. H. Bishop's contribu- 
tion. It is important to lay stress on this point as neither the lat- 
ter' s name nor any reference to his extensive and expensive 
researches in this country and abroad, which he has been carry- 
ing on for the past twenty years, is mentioned by Mr. H. F. 

I Bishop. The sub-title "Bishop Genealogy from 1636" is mis- 

leading. A more extensive acquaintance with genealogical sys- 
tems and sources would have enabled the author to have placed 

I a book in the hands of his family which would have fully cov- 

I ered the subject, and been arranged in accordance with accepted 

genealogical methods. 

The Tarleton Family. Compiled by C. W. Tarleton. 
Concord, N. H., 1900. 8vo, pp. 244. Price, $2.00. 

A well known EnjjHsh familv of Tarletons derived their name 
from Tarleton near Liverpool, and boast among their noted 
•members. Gen. Sir Banastre Tarleton, a British officer of 
unusual cruelty and courage during the Revolution. The name 
-was not uncommon in London during the century preceding the 
Puritan migration to New England, but nothing is known con- 
'Cernlng the ancestry of the emigrants of the name. 

Richard Tarleton of New Castle, N. H., may be that Richard 
who married in London, 22 May, 1666, Edith Lockson. It is 
known that Ruth his widow was a second wife, and it is sup- 
posed he came to New England in the employ of John Mason 



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a9o BOOK NOTES. 

about 1685. In 1692 he married Ruth, daughter of Elias 
Stileman, Jr., and was drowned in 1706. His children were 
Elias, who died in 17S5, aged 92, William, Richard, and Ruth. 
The book, presents the descendants of Elias and Richard. 

The Maryland Tarletons are traced to six sources, all of 
Revolutionary times. 

Jeremiah and Thomas Tarleton, born in St. Mary's County, 
Maryland, were the progenitors of the Roman Catholic Tarle- 
tons. They are supposed to be near relatives of a James 
Tarleton who died in 1756. Caleb who founded the Virginian 
family is supposed to be of the same group as John, Jeremiah, 
and Caleb (the latter progenitor of the Kentucky family), who 
are supposed sons of a John Tarleton whose will was presented 
for probate in 1770, and that the family had removed to Hagars- 
town from St. Mary's. These latter were Protestants. There 
were other earlier Tarletons, and there is a family record of a 
Steplien Tarleton who died in 1687, but information is lacking 
from which to construct a pedigree. The present work tells 
what is known of this southern family. 

The author has very wisely adopted the plan of preceding 
each section of his book with a skeleton pedigree, and has 
supplied an excellent index. The book will prove of great 
value to the different branches of the family, and the work so 
well begun will be followed, we hope, by further investigations 
into the history of the southern lines and the origin of both the 
New England and Maryland families. 

• The connection of Henry Tarleton, of Boston, who died in 
16S0, aged 31, leaving a son Robert, with the other families is 
not known. Nor can descendants be traced. It is family 
tradition that William, son of Richard Tarleton, settled in the 
South. 

Cornet Joseph Parsons, one of the Founders of 
Springfield (1636), and Northampton (1655), Mass. By 
Henry M. Burt, with Supplementary Chapters by Albert Ross 
Parsons. Garden City, N. Y. 8vo, paper, pp. 187. Price, 
$3.25. 

Joseph Parsons was for many years a leading spirit In the 
Connecticut valley in Massachusetts. The first seventy-four 



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BOOK NOTES. 291 

pages are devoted to his history, which throws much light upon > 
contemporary events. An interesting feature is the reproduction 
of Pynchon's ledger account with him, covering the years 1653- 
1670, from which much valuable information may be had. 
The entries in Pynchon's account books mention Benjamin 
Parsons as the brother of Joseph, and from this fact Mr. Parsons 
has been led to pursue a line of investigation which disproves 
the late Col. Chester's theory as to the English origin of the 
Parsons family, and that Hugh Parsons, of Springfield, was 
brother of Joseph and Benjamin. He furthermore, in another 
chapter on the "Honorable Family of Parsons" in England, 
seems to correctly locate the origin of the family in Devonshire 
and to connect Joseph Parsons as kin to the famous Pynchon 
family. 

The remainder of this valuable addition to American geneal- 
ogy is devoted to an account of the early emigrants of the name, 
and many of their descendants. Representations of the coat 
1 armor of the English families of the name are given in the text 

and as a frontispiece. - 

Year Book of the Ohio Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution for 1S98, and Supplement Thereto. 
Edited for the Society by Lucius Carroll Herrick, M. D. 
Columbus, Ohio, 1S9S, 1900. 

These two volumes contain ancestral records of members of 
the Ohio Society, S. A. R., with accounts of the services of 
ancestors which confer eligibility to membership, also the pro- 
ceedings of the Society with addresses delivered at the annual 
banquets, in which is much historical information. Such year 
books are excellent incentives to historical work and are respon- 
sible in a great measure for the great interest awakened in 
America in genealogical and historical pursuits. The editor is 
well known as an enthusiast in these lines and has served his 
compatriots loyally, as these volumes testify. 

Proceedings of the John Bean (1660) Association at 
its Reunion at Boston, Sept. 5, 1900. 

This pamphlet contains, besides the account of the meeting, 
considerable genealogical information. The secretary is Mr. 



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29* BOOK NOTES. 

D. G. Bean, of East Milton, Me., to whom or Hon. J. H. Drum- 
mond, of Portland, Me., genealogical data may be sent. 

The Maryland Calendar of Wills, Vol. i. Compiled 
and Edited by Jane Baldwin. Baltimore, Md. : W. J. C. 
Dalaney Co., 1901. . 

This valuable volume covers the period 1635 to 1685, the 
-earliest estate settled being that of William Smith, of Augusta, 
Carolina, a Roman Catholic, on 22 Sept., 1635. Thewill books 
of the proceedings of the Prerogative Court of the Province, 
with two exceptions, are preserved at Annapolis. Those who 
have been under the necessity of searching the orignals, will 
instantly appreciate the great service rendered the public by 
Mrs. Baldwin, whose conscientious and laborious ^vork during 
several years is nov/ available in this form. The arrangement 
■ is excellent, all necessary items are printed and there is a good 
index. We trust this volume \vill be followed by others. 
Libraries, in the South and West especially, should obtain 
-copies of this work, which is indispensable to students of 
southern genealogy. 

Supplement to the Descendants of Nathaniel Mowry, 
of Rhode Island. By William A. Mowry. Boston, 1900. 
8vo, pp. 95. Price, $1.00. 

Mr. I^Iowry published twenty-five years ago an excellent 
genealogy of the Mowry family descended from Nathaniel 
Mowry. Later Mr. John O. Austin discovered Nathaniel's 
parentage. 

This supplement, therefore, gives not only additional data 
regarding Nathaniel's descendants but a resume of what is 
known of Roger Mowry and his family. Roger Mowry came 
to New England in 1631.^ His only wife was Mary, eldest 
daughter of John Johnson, of Roxbury. He had at first settled 
in Boston but removed with Roger Williams to Plymouth and 
thence to Salem, whence about 1649 he removed to Providence 
" where he died 5 Jan., 1666. His wife was buried at Rehoboth, 
29 Jan., 1679. The house built by Roger Mowry at Providence 
in 1653 or earlier was demolished in 1900. It is fully described 
in "Early Rhode Island Houses" by Isham and Brown. 



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BOOK NOTES. ^93 

Mowry was a staunch supporter of Roger Williams and followed 
his fortunes. His children were : — 

Roger, died young. 

Jonathan, bapt. Salem, 2-2, 1636; m. 18 July, 1659, -^^^ry, 
widow of Richard Foster and daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Warren) Bartlett ; m., 2d, Hannah . 

Bethia (Appia), bapt. 17-4, 1638; m. 30 Sept., 1662, 
George Palmer. 

Mary, bapt. 16-11, 1639. 

Eliza, bapt. 27-1, 1642. 

Nathaniel, born 1644; d. 24 March, 171S; m. 1666, Joanna, 
daughter of Edw. Inman. 

John, born 1645 ; d. 7 July, 1690; m, Mary. 

Mehitable, born probably 1646; m., ist, 1662, Eldad Kingsley, 
of Rehoboth, son of John and born 163S; d. 28 Aug., 1679. 
She married, 2d., Timothy Brooks. 

Joseph, born 1647; d. 27 May, 1716; m. Mary Wilbur. 

Benjamin, bapt. Salem, 20-3, 1649; m. Martha, widow of 
Ichabod Potter and dau. of Thos. and Martha Hazard. 
- Thomas, born in Providence, 19 July, 1652; d. 25 Dec, 
1717 ; m. 6 Sept., 1673, Susanna, dau. of Abraham and Susanna 
(Rand) Newell. 

Hannah, born 28 Sept., 1656; d. 171S; m. 3 Dec, 1674, 
Benj., son of Philip and Sarah (Odding) Sherman, who died 24 
Sept., 1 719, aged 69. 

- The Descendants of William Towne Who Came to 
America on or about 1630 and settled in Salem, Mass. Com- 
piled by Edwin Eugene Towne. Newton ville, 1901. ' Svo, 

PP- 372. 

The wording of the title is not in keeping with the facts 

recorded in the book. An unwise concession has been made to a 

tradition which is quoted in a footnote on page 5. William 

Towne obtained the usual grant of land made to newcomers, 

who were considered desirable residents, by the town of Salem, 

II October, 1640. At that time he already possessed a house, 

and three or four months before had obtained a verdict against 

John Cook in a land suit which may have arisen from a pur- 



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294 BOOK NOTES. 

chase of lands from Cook. In 1651 he removed to Topsfield. 
Towne was not one of the inhabitants of Salem in 1637 ; his 
daughter Mary was baptized at Yarmouth 24 Aug., 1634; mani- 
festly, then, he could not have been of Salem in 1630, nor for 
many years after, in spite of " family records in the possession of 
one of the descendants *' which influenced the compiler to place 
an erroneous date on his title page. It is to be regretted that 
httle information about William Towne is placed before the 
reader where he could naturally seek it, on page 21. The read- 
er must search through the preceding more or less disconnected 
accounts of the origin of the name, of Yarmouth, etc., to learn 
the simple facts of the marriage of William Towne, 25 March, 
1620, his wife's name, Joanna Blessing, and that the baptism 
of his first six children are recorded in Yarmouth records : or 
that William Towne died in 1672 and his wife ten years later. 
With the above notable exceptions, the book presents the infor- 
mation required in convenient place and form, and shows great 
and conscientious labor on the part of the compiler. A list of 
soldiers in all wars, bearing the name, is given. Altogether the 
book deserves praise and should answer the needs of a family 
which is widely scattered. 

No evidence of the ancestry of William Towne, of Salem, 
has been discovered and the autl or calls particular attention to 
that fact, especially In a note regarding coat armor. He prints 
for what it is worth, the statement which has done duty 
so long, that William Towne was perhaps the son of Richard and 
Ann, of Braceby County, Lincoln, and presents the will of Ann 
who died in 1630. Richard arid Ann Towne had a son, Wil- 
liam, baptized in 1603, who was executor of his mother's estate 
in 1630, and, as far as the context of the will shows, we have no 
reason to suppose he was not a resident of Braceby or vicinity, 

, instead of Yarmouth distant a hundred miles. Moreover, born 
in 1603, it is not probable that he could have married as early as 

■ 1620. 

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BOOK NOTES. 295-A^4> 

1635, who died in 1685 leaving a son, Peter, who is said to 
have been born in 1633, and probably an eldest child. It is 
much more likely that William, of Cambridge, rather than he of 
Salem, was the William born to Richard Towne, of Braceby, 
in 1603. 

It is to be regretted that the author did not expose these in- 
consistencies,* instead of merely reprinting the accounts of earlier 
historians whose judgments it must be presumed he does not 
himself accept. 

Two daughters of William Towne, of Salem and Topsfield, 
were among the martyrs to popular superstition in 1692. Re- 
becca the brave wife of Francis Nurse, and Mary, the equally 
unfortunate wife of Isaac Esty, suffered death for an impossible 
crime. Their names will ever be revered as of two women who 
dared to maintain their innocence when a bold confession would 
have resulted in life and liberty. 

*From a recent communication we learn that Mr. Towne takes the same 
view as expressed above. 



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INDEX TO VOL. II. 
THE GENEALOGICAL QUARTERLY MAGAZINE. 

[The list of taxpayers in Salem, l68j, page i68, is not indexed.] 

[In using the index remember that a lower number following any multiple of ten is to be read as part of the 
. ten preceding. Thus : 6, 60, 4, 100, 20, 2=6, 60, 64, 100, 120, 122. 



Abbott, 118, 19, 36, 242, 8. 

Abingdon, Va., 62. 

Adams, 18, 74, 112, 20,2,79, 

86, 89, 244. 
Additon, 179. 
Albee, 123. 

Alden, 38, 61, 128, 239,43, 6, 8. 
Aldrich, 248. 
Alford, 49. 
Alexander, 179. 
Allen, 15, 34, 8, 47, 8, 95, 8, 

128, 39, 63, 82, 216, 216 a, 

28, 45, 8, 9, S4. 
Amsden, 249, 50. 
Andover, Mass., births, mar- 
riages, deaths, 134. 
Andrus, 244. 
Andrews, ii, 13, 51, 3,63, 129, 

58, 63. 
Antram, 2, 133, 204, 5. 
Appleford, 6. 
Appleton, 5, 6, 10. 
Archard, 12, 128, 9, 40, i, 4, 

208. 
Archer, l6i. 

Armitage, 3, 12, 132, 209. V 

Arms of Mansuer, 202. 

Mansur, 202. 

Orne, 176. 
Arnold, 249. 
Ashby, 66, 158, 72. 
Askett, 149. 
Aspinwall, 132, 240, 9. 
Association Test of 1776, 107. 
Astin, 40. 
Atherton, 10. 
Augusta, 292. 
Auger, 178. 
Austin, 40, 292. 
Avery, 241, 82-5. 
Aves, 151. 
Axsey, 137. 
Ayer, 39. 
Ayers, 63, 138, 206. 

Babbadge, 160. 
Bab, 171. 
Babcock, 47. 
Bacon, 13, 21-3, 49. 
Baird, 113. . 



Baker, i, 8, 20-2, 133, 72. 

Balch, 154. 

Ball, 27, 66. 

Baldwin, 67, 233, 4, 6, 92. 

Bailey, 52, 66, 78, 115, 16, 29, 

33, 7, 44, 6, 95, 203, 4, 34, 

9, 41, 83-6. 
Ballard, 122,32,239,42,45,49. 
Ballerd, 200. 
Bancroft, 68. 
Bankson, 16. 

Barnes, 17, 19, 22, 118, 41. 
Baptists, Free Will, 224. 
Barber, 15, 16, 19, 30, 3. 
Barker, 40, 67, 134, 201. 
Barnes, 20S. 
Barnett, 172. 
Barney, 131, 55,72. 
Barrett, 215, 38. '-- 

Barrister, 47. 
Barrow, Barrows, 83, 213, 25, 

49. 
Barrus, 225. 

Bartholomew, 2, 140, i, 58, 60. 
Bartle, 172. 

Bartlett, 94, 136,72, 293. 
Bartol, 142, 5, 72. 
BartoU, 177. 
Barton, 14I, 61, 2, 72, 3. 
Bastar, 49. 
Basey, 172. 
Bateman, 26. 
Bates, 77. 
Batten, 163,73. 
Batter, i, 2, 4, 13, 129, 32, 3, 

44. 5. 7» 54. 6-8, 205, 7, 8. 
Batts, 134. 
Baxter, 163, 172. 
Beach, 17-21, 125, 78. 
Beacham, 2, 164. 
Beale, 4. 
Beadle, 166, 72. 
Bean, 291. 
Beddington, 151. 
Beckett, 12. 
Beckwith, 165. 
Beebe, 213. \ 

Beers, 21. 
Belding, 27, 96. 
Belinger, 149. 
Bellows, 47, 8, 73. 



Bemis, 57. 

Benjamin, 152, 228. 

Benners, 151. 

Bennett, 5, 6, 68, 129, 204, 5, 

6, 40. 

Bently, 79. , 

Benton, 249, 74. 

Bernard, 201. 

Berry, 67. 

Best, 159, 78. 

Beverly, Mass., 154, 5« 

Bex, II, 132. 

Bickford, 149. 

Binford, 35. 

Bingley, 136. 

Bingham, 236. 

Bishop, 4-6, II, 129, 33, 51, 5, 

72, 205, 6, 88. 
Bixby, 47, 8, 95. 
Black, 8, 130. 
Blackman, 183. 
Blair, 24. * 

Blaisdell, 249. 
Blake, 122. 

Blaner, Blany, 10, 12, 32. 
Blanchard, 106. 
Blessing, 294. 
Blethen, Blefin, 179. 
Bligh, 49. 
Blish, 231. 

Bliss,45, 238,9,45,6,7, 9, 85. 
Blockington, 192. 
Blood, 106, 23. 
Blodgett, 239, 47- 
Blomfield, 136. 
Bly, 25, 113, 72, 3> 6, 8. 
Blythe, 159. 
Bodwell, 41, 200. 
Bolton, 32, 136. 
Bond, 249. 
Bonen, 164. 
Booth, 161, 4, 174. 
Borhonse, 22. 
Boril, 137. 
Bostwick, 23, 45. 
Boque, 184. 
Boston, 283. 
■ Bosworth, 233, 49. 
Bourden, 284. 

Bourjohn, 23. '' , 

Bowen, 218, 49. 



297 



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INDEX TO VOL. II. 



Bowker, 14, 93. 

Boyce, 133, 66. 

Boyd, 55, 118. 

Boyden, 164. 

Brabrook, 5. 

Bracket, 20S. 

Bradbury, 20S, 9, 10. 

Bradley, 186, 283, 4. 

Bradford, 61. 

Bradish, 38. 

Bradstreet, 138, 45. 

Brattle, 37. 

Bray, 52. 

Brewer, 73, 4. 

Brewster, 61, 284, 5. 

Breed, 3, 133. 

Bridges, 12, 112,29,80. 

Bridgham, 145. 

Brishing, 219. 

Brittall, 151. 

Brimblecombe, 142, 3. 

Broaddus, 66. 

Brocklebank, 134. 

Bromley, 80. 

Brooks, 30, 2, 94, 7, 112, 293 

Brotherton, 67. 

Broshee, 191. 

Brown, I, 2, 5, 6, 10, ii, 26 
39. 53> 6^^> 7> So, 128, 30, I 
6, 8, 9, 44-6, 51-4, 7, 8, 64 
72, 8, 89,326,34,9, 87,92. 

Browning, 66. 

Brush, 83. 

Bryan-Lillard, 66. 

Bryant, 234, 39. 

Buckman, 12. 

Budd, 152. 

Bufium, 4, 133, 205, 7. 

Bull, 77, 159. 

Buell, 26, 133. 

Bundy, 47, 8. 

Bunnell, 21. 

Burhans, 22. 

Burnham, 5-7, 139- 

Burges, 204, 5. 

Burkbee, 134. 

Burling, 213. 

Burlington, Vt., 213. 

Burnap, 204. 

Burrell, 3, 133, 4- 

Burrows, 116, a, 223. 

Burroughs, 200. 

Burt, 290. 

Burton, 2, 205. 

Bushnell, 24. 

Buswell, 249. 

Buspell, 249. 

Buttolph, 155. 

Butts, 10. 
' Butler, 12. 

Buxton, 2, 165. 

Buxter, 156. 

Cable, 19, 20, 2. 
Cagrove, 218, 9. 



Cahill, 124, 93, 4. 

Cain, See Keayne, 36, 144. 

Caldwell, 46. 

Callender, 46. 

Calcott, 149. 

Callaway, 152. 

Calkins, 46, 7, 178. 

Call, 215. 

Calley, 128, 64. 

Cambridge, Mass., 65. 

Camp, 24, 287. 

Campbell, 16, 149, 52, 97. 

Candee, 94. 

Canfield, 27, 67. 

Cannon, 163. 

Cantlebury, 146. 

Capron, 225. 

Carlton, 83, 108. 

Carrelton, loS. 

Carr, 120. 

Cardinas, Germanism, 262. 

Carpenter, 18. 

Carter, 66, 95, 128, 39. 

Carton, 186. 

Case, 53. 

Catlin, 46. 

Cave, 66. 

Case, 161, 246. 

Chacksfield, Chaxfield, 132. 

Chaxson, 132. 

Chadwell, 3, 133. '^ 

Chadwick, 38, 183. 

Chandler, 41, 55, 134, 5, 7. 

Chapel, 283-6. 

Chaplin, 167. 

Charles, 3, 10, 134. 
■ Chapman, in, 50. 

Chase, 78, 116. 

Chatfield, 65. 

Cheney, 14, 23S. 

Cheever, 51, .59. 

Chesebrough, 229. 

Cheshire, 213. 

Chester, 291. 

Chilton, 61. 

Childs, 197. 

Chichester, 142. 

Chiswell, 63. 

Chittenden, 65. 

Chillicothe, O., 268. 

Choate, 11, 12, 13, 67, 129, 

38. 
Chubb, 12, 206. 
Church, 21, 234. 
Church at Salem, loi. 
Churchill, 149. 
Clark, 24, 5, 45, 6, 128, 31, 4, 

9, 41, 60, 174, 8, 80, 203, 6, 

41, 87. 
Clayton, 66. 
Claverack, 149. 
Cleike, 3. 
Clement, 139. 
Cleveland, 34, 234; Ohio, 268. 



Cleaves, 150. 

Clifford, 173, 7. 

Closson, 234. 

Clough, 58. 

Coburn, 189^ 

Codner, 3, 4, 10, 130, 42, 

203, 8. 
Coffee, 21. 
Coffin, 137, 204. 
Cogswell, 13. 
Coits, 284-6. 

Colburn, 13, 234, 9, 47, .50. 
Colchester, Conn., 230. 
Coldams, 134. 
Cole, 66, 173, 226. 
Coleman, 66. 
Collier, 173. 
Collins, 9, 120, 9, 159, 63,2 

13- 
Combs, 157, 9, 73. 

Comstock, 217. 

Conde, 142, 3. 

Connant, 4, 130, 2, 3, 46. 

Cornish, 18, 22. 

Connecticut, Massachusetts,: 

Connecticut's Ohio lands, 26 

Conway, 66. 

Convers, 95, 240. 

Cooler, 152. 

Cooley, 82. 

Xook, 2, 66, 80, 107, 206 

26, 35, 7, 41, 2, 50, 93. 

Corbet, 8. 

Corey, 92. 

Corning, 133, 46, 208. 

Corwin, 163, 4, 5, 7. 

Cowman, 206. 

Cotta, 146. 

Cox, 173, 8. 

Coy, 134. 

Crabtree, 156, 223. 

Crafts, 3, 133. 

Craig, 1S4. 

Cranever, 163. 

Crissey, 57, 141. 

Crawford, 159. 

Crefield, Germany, 258. 

Croad, 128, 77. 

Crocker, 52, 24I, 3, 6. 

Croffts, 137. 

Cromwell, 141, 5-7, 60, 5, 

Cronk, 183. * 

Crown Point, 151. 

Crow, 283. 

Crosby, 135, 209, 12. 

Crosse, 52, 139, 59. 

Crossett, 241. 

Grossman, 45. 

Crum, 83. 

Cuby, 162. 

Cully, 1 88. 

Culpeper, Va., 65. 

Culter, 76, 173. 

Cunningham, 74. 



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«99 



Cure for cancer, 52. 
Curtin, 179, 81. 
Curtis, 2, 18-23, 158. 

Curvven, 129,45,8, 53, 4-8, 73- 
Cushenburry, 60. 
Cutting, 136. 
Cutts, 132. 

Dale, 53. 

Damon, 44, 68. 

Dana, 58, 235, 8. 

Dane, 5, 138. 

Daniels, Danyal, 97, 286. 

Darling, 144. 

Dart, 285, 6. 

Daveson, 20, i, 235. 

Davis, 3, 46, 78, III, 34, 46, 

244- 
Day, 219, 23. 

Dayland, Dealand, 26, 7, 150, 

62. 
Dean, 165. 
Dedarra, 113. 
Deene, 192. 
Deerfield captives, 97. 
Delano, 250. 
Delancy, 292. 
Demick, 123. 
Denman, 99. 
Denison, 4-6, ii, 13, 129, 36, 

40, 3, 210. 
Denne, 150. 
Dennis, 153, 78. 
Denvris, 174. 
Derby, 153. 
Derring, 186. 
Devenish, i. 
Devereaux, 22. 
Dewey, 240. 
Dexter, 144. 
Dickey, 83. 
Dickinson, 136. 
Dickap, I 54. 
Dill, 250. 
Dillow, II. 
Dilley, 11, 197. 
Divine, 150. 
Dixie, 4, 140, 6. 
Dixon, 149, 51, 287. 
Dobson, 10. 
Dodge, 26, 184, 207. 
Doleman, 158. 
Dollins, 126. 
Dolliver, i, 145, 206, 8. 
Dory, 151. 
Douner, 239. 
Dount, 161, 74." 
Douty, 178. 
Dowd, 26, 28. 
Dowell, 6. 

Downer, 230, 4, 5i 8, 50. 
Downey, 230. 
Downing, 49, 144, 50, 5. 
Douglass, 130, 2$o, S4-7. 
Drake, 20S, 12. 



Draper, 220. 
Dreckan, 154. 
Dresser, 136. 
Dresden, Me., 265. 
Driver, 178. 
Drummond, 292. 
Drury, 48, 108. 
Dudgeon, 194. 
Dudley, 4, 6, 16, 97. 
Dummer, 36. 
Dumarey, 175. 
Dunbar, 16. 
Dundas, Lord, 266. 
Dunnells, 125. 
Dunkards, 261. 
Dunsmore, 216. 
Dunn, 197, 8. 
Dunning, 180, i, 2. 
Dunton, 80, 160, 75. 
Durkee, 250. 
Dutch, 130. 
Dyman, 286. 

Eastman, 48, 115. 

Eastwick, 163. 

Eaton, 159, 212. 

Ebbens, 161. 

Eddy, 228. 

Ec^gell, 73, 4. 

Edgcrton, 247. 

Edmands, 12, 208, 9, 10, ii, 

12. 
Edson, 17, 19-23. 
Edwards, 53, 178, 250. 
Eldridge, 57, 234, 9, 46, 50. 
Ellet, 4, 133, 40. 
Ellenwood, 146. 
Elliott, 112, 74, 77. 
Elithorp, 135. 
Ellis, 3, 151, 250. 
Elson, 161. 
Elsworth, 135. 
Elwell, 142. 
Emerson, 11, 204. 
Emerton, 104. 
Emery, 157, 9, 209. 
Endicott, 49, 52, 157. 
England, 171; Gravestones in, 

71- 
English, 167. 
Ephrata Community, 261. 
Epply, 185. 

Epps, 53> 156, 62. 

Essex Institute, 72, lOi. 

Estabrook, 234, 5, 6, 7, 45, 6. 

Esty, 140, 295. 

Everts, 17. 

Ewing, 179, 80. 

Eyres, 138. 

Fairbanks, Scale Works, 277. 
Fairchild, 27. 
Fairfield, 52, 3. 
Fairweather, 53. 
Farman, 208. 



Farmen, 17, 20, i. 

Farr, 182. 

Farrar, 207. 

Farrington, 207. 

Fay, 48, 95. 

Fellows, 4, 5, 96. 

Felt, 107, 13. 

Felton, 2, 161, 2, 3, 5, 76. 

Ferguson, 187, 198. 

Ferrers, 151. 

Fessenden, 47. 

Fifield, 209, 1 1. 

Field, 66. 

Fincastle, Co., Va., 63. 

Fincastle resolution, 63. 

Fiske, 19, 15S, 207. 

Fitch, 184. 

Fitzgibbon, 56. 

Flinn, 183. 

Flint, 2, 52, 3, 133, 57, 63, 4, 

6, 74, 7, 206, 7. 
Fogg, 10 1. 
Fontaine, 66. 
Foot, 24. 
Forbush, 81. 
Ford, 27. 

Fosdick, 21, 57, 215, 
Foss, 149. 

Foster, 6, 113, 38, 50, i, 160, 

7, 78, 200, 18, 19, 22,86, 93. 
Fowlis, 50. 

Fox, 49, 234, 43. 
Foye, 116. 
Francis, 65. 
Frank, 152. 
F'razer, 156. 
Freeman, 2i6a, 243, 4. 
Freese, 17. 

French, 25, 39, 47, 8, 120, 86. 
French occupation of Ohio, 266. 
Frisby, 18, 9, 178. 
Freiztle, 177. 
Frost, 161. 
Fry, 66, 149. 

Fuller, II, 2, 4, 50. I30» 8, 
56, 60, 3, 4, 5, 7, 74, 218, 

25. 33. 6, 7, 46. 
Fulford, 19, 25. 

Gad, 196. 

Gaflney, 82. 

Gage, 4, 5, 6, 9, 40, 250. 

Gale, 45. 

Ganson, 163, 74. 

Gardner, 2, 4, 133, 46, 57, 9, 

61, 6, 7, 72,3, 205, 7. 
Garlick, 17, 8, 9, 20, I. 
Garrett, 66. 
Gascone, 154. 
Gaskin, 166, 205. 
Gatchel, 159, 177. 
Gatchell, 161. 
Gault, 145. 
Geares, 284-6. 
Gedney, 129, 30, 57, 64, 5, 208. 



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300 



INDEX TO VOL. II. 



Geffards, 144. Grinman, 66. 

Georgia, 241. Griswold, 16, 99, 151, 236, 7, 

Georgia, Germans in, 259. 40> 5> "» 7* 

Germans in New England, 265. Grizzell, 151. 

n c D 1 Grove, 166, 78. 

German names of Pennsylva- r^ ' t- 

•' Orover, 2, 130, 47, 206. 



nia, 265. 
Germans in the Middle West, 

272. 
German Migration to America, 

255- 
Getchel, 163, 78. 

Getchell, 173. 

Gibbs, 161. 

Gibson, 149, 83. 

Gideons, 19. 



Guild, 64. 
Guppy, 161, 73, 8. 
Guttason, 40. 



Giddings, 6, 7, 8, 15, 74, 5. 



179. 



201, 



Hadley, 48, 178, 204, 
Haldiman Papers, 183. 
Hale, 28, 9, 136, 54. 
Hall, 5, 14, 6; 7, 8, 9, 49, 235, 

6, 45- 
Halsall, 204. 

Gifford, 20, 132, 44. Hamilton, 125, 257. 

Gilbert, 97. Hamlin, 15. 

Gill, 77. Hancock, 94. 

Gillam. 20, 48, 9, 159. Hankes, 5S, 96, loS, 43, 4. 

Gingell, 173. Hard, 27, 

Glassell, 65. Hardy, 162, 94. 

Glover, 159, 77. Harwinton, Ct., 280. 

Gloucester town, 3. Harlow, 79, 82, 4. 

Gloucester, Mass., 134. Harper, 152. 

Gloyd, 17S. Harpswell, Me., families, 

Goble, 58. Harod, 129. 
Godfrey, I, 8, 12, 143,4, 204., Harris, 94, 109, 48, 50, 

Godsoe, 1 78, 83-7. 

Goff, 19, 24. Harrington, 46, 58, 73, 4. 

Gold, 163. Harrison, 19, 22, 3. 

Goldrick, 55. Hartel, 199. 

Goldsmith, 133. Hartshorn, 235, 46. 

Golihrite, 204. Hartshorne, 104. 

Gordon, 149. Harvard, 232. 

Gose, 16. Harvey, 55, 6, 80, 105, 8, 54, 

Gott, 134, 205. 287. 

Gould, 2, 6, 91, 140, 250. Harwood, 146. 

Goodale, 173. Hascol, iSo. 

Goodell, 52, loi. Haseltine 6, 132. 

Goodhuse, I. Haskall, 208. 

Goodroe, 173. Haskell, 2, 44, 6, I47, 8, 28S. 

Grafton, 157, 167, 74. Hatch, 241. 

Graham, 245. Hathorne 3, 9, 10, il, 131, 7, 

Gray, 3, to, 159, 237, 46. 44, 57, 65, 6, 7, 204. 

Graves, 6, 35, 150. Haughey, 196. 
Green, 7, 22, 57, 66, 139, 40, Hauxhurst, 213. 
60, 65, 74,208, 9, 10, II, 12, Hauley, 163. 



39. 44- 
Greenhalge, 113. 

Greenland, 92. 

Greenlaw, 62. 

Greenow, 174. 

Greenough, 251. 

Greenville, line, 267, 9. 

Greenslade, 159. 

Gregory, 22, 3. 

Gridley, 37. 

Griffin, 6, 7, 10, 109, 13, 14, 

129. 
Griger, 23. 
G"^jgs,49. 
Grinble, 139. 
Grindley, 276. 



Hawley, 49. 
Hayley, 18. 
Haynes, 154, 78, 285." 
Hazard, 293. 
Haywood, 15. 
Heald, 108. 
Heale, Healey, 142. 
Heaston, 163. 
Hebard, 243, 4. S^* 
Hebbard, 235, 6, 8, 41, 2. 
Heires, 206. 
Hempstead, 2S5. 
Henderson, 174, 6, 8. 
Henry, Winston, 66. • 
Henshaw, 34. 
Heoman, 159. 



Herrick, 2, 7, 12, 130, 47, 8 

54,65, 72, 206, 91. 
Herron, 17. 
Heth, 243. 
Hewes, 161. 
Hibbard, 130,48, 235. 
Hibburd, 206. 
Hicox, 23, 45, 6. 
Hickok, 125, 6. 
Hidden, 135. 
Higginson, 154, 5, 7, 63, 5, 7 

78, 205, 6, 7. 
Hildreth, 150. 
Hill, 16, 26, 66, 163, 205. 
Hills, 57, 92. 
Hilyard, 208. 
Hirst, 167. 
Hitchcock, 20, 2, 3. 
Hoadley, 178. 
Hokon, 49, 123, 55, 6. 
Hodgkinson, 19. 
Hoffman, 124. 

Hokam, Holkum, 157. 

Holden, 36. 

Holdridge, 144. 

Holis, 159. 

Hollingsworth, 139, 57, 61. 

Mollis, 163. 

Holmes, 183. 

Holt, 112, 21. 

Holton, 51, 3. 

Homes, 178. 

Hooper, 55. 

Horm, 145, 9. 

Horton, 119. 

Howchin, 139. 

Houghton, 201. 

Hough, 239,43, 7, I, 51, 82-; 

House of 1659, 12. 

Hovey, 5, 11, 63, 70, 13S, 9. 

Howard, 3, 67, 132, 58, 67, 72 
87,8. 

Howe, I, 8, 27, 251. 

Horsel, 157^ 

Houton, Outon, 164. 

Hubbard, 12, 25,6, 140. 

Hubbcll, 17, 8, 24. 

Hudson, 48, 207, 86. 

Huff, 152. 
" Huggins, 211. 

Hull, 155. 

Hun, 159, 63. 

Hunt, 115. 

Huntington, 240, 7, 51. 

Huson, 77. 

Hustin, 119. 

Hut chins, 209. 

Hutchinson, 239. 

Hyde, 85, 142, 234, 5, 6, 7, ' 

Ilsly, 143. 

Ilsey, 210. 

Indian, Ned of Lynn, 144. 

Indians, 183. 






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301 



! 
1 



Indian barriers, 287. 
Indiana, 209. 
Ingalls, II, 129,34. 
Ingerson, 161, 3, 4, 75. 
Ingpisoll, 2, 26, 164, 177. >^ 
Ingham, 196, 217, 18, 25. 
Inman, 293. 
Insloe, 213. 
Ipswich, Mass., 214. 
Ipswich town, i, 52. 
Iron works, 213. 
Isham, 198. 
Ivans, 177. 

Jackson, 139, 53. 

Jacob, 6, 10, 12, 53. 

Jacobs, 165. 

James, 3, 142, 4, 5, 165. 

Janverin, 175. 

Jaquis, 9. 

Jeffries, 58. 

Jencks, 131, 44, 220. 

Jenkins, 212. 

Jennings, 18, 96. 

Jennison, 47, 8. 

Jervis, 21, 2, 3, 144. 

Jewett, 7, 130, 304. 

Jigles, 2. 

Johns, 84. 

Johnson, 17, 20, 4, 49, 58, 80, 

91, 128, 135, 142, 3, 5, 152, 

206, 51, 92. 
Joiner, 14, 92. 
Jones, 13, 26, 66, 109, 46, 

206, 7,35, 36, 38,40,41,46. 
Jordan, 21 . 
Joslyn, 251. 
Joy, 49, 178. 
Joyes, 160. 

Karr, 242. 

Keany, 17S. 

Keanye, See Cain, 144. 

Kelborn, 178. 

Kellogg, 44. 

Kcndrick, 204. 

Keny, 167. 

Kenny, 160. 

Kent. Soc, 146. 

Ker, 242. 

Kersor, 3, 167. 

Kertell, 152. 

Keyney, 284, 5. 

Kidder, 275. 

Kilburn,47, 8, 135, 238. 

Killock, 151. 

Killam, 134. 

Kimball (Kt-rable), 9, 97, 13 1, 

8, 15a, 201, 9, II, 2, 3. 
Kimpton, 123. 
Kingbury, 277. 
Kingsbury, 187. 
Kingsley, 293. 
King, 4, 17, 44, 5, 9, 132, 3, 9, 

77> 84. 



Kinsman, 11. 

Kitchen, 4, 133, 45, 7, 205, 7. 

Knapp, 67. 

Knight, 8, 9, 57, 136, 144. 

Knowlton, 13. 

Koffy, 19. 

Kuf, 152. 

Lamb, 58. 

Lambert, 135, 6, 65, 7, 77. 

Lamberton, 99. 

Lander, 158, 9, 174, 5. 

Landor, 165. 

Land bounty records, 74. 

Land ordinance of 1785, 267. 

Land, sale of, by auction, 141. 

Lane, 22, 216a. 

Lang, 206. 

Langley, 204. 

Lake, 155. 

Larckum, 129. 

Lasell, 245. 

Laskins, 2. 

Lassell, 9. 

Lathrop, 233, 41, 3, 7, 51. 

Latrappe, 14I. 

Lattimore, 285, 7. 

Lauchin, 149. 

Law, 135. 

Lawrence, 197. 

Leach, 2, 154, 7, 61, 3, 72. 

Leader, 132. 

Leavitt, 47. 

Lee, 17, 138, 150,9, 193. 

Lcgg, 130,45, 203, 8. 

Leigh, 138. 

Lemeer, 160. 

Leonard, 144, 217, 9. 

Lewis, 14. 

Lighthorn, 152. 

Lincoln, 270. 

Lindall, 155. ' 

Lister, 2S2, 4, 5. 

Littlehale, 143, 204. 

Livingston, 20. 

Lloyd, 49. ^ 

Lobdell, i-H^^r^ I ^ 

Lockson, 289. 

Lockwood, 76, 7. 

Long, 149. 

Longbottom, 155. 

Longley, 129, 33, 43, 203. 

Loombs, Loomes, 175. 

Loomer, 251. 

Loomis, 94, 155' 

Lord, 4, 7, 9, 38. 64, 13S, 9 

43> 54, 62, 211. 
Lolhrop, 6, 12, 140, 1. 
Low, 138. 
Lowell, 49. 
Lovett, 140. 
Lovejoy, 40, i, 200. 
Lynch, 78. 
Lynde, Lyndle, 10. 
Lyndell, 174. 



i 



Lynn, Mass., Iron Works, 143. 
Lyman, 119, 241, 5. 
Lyon, 17, 25. 
Lucas, 180. 
Lunt, 138. 

Mack, 112, 24. 

Mackenzie, 59. 

Mackmally, Mackmallous, 159, 

175. 
Macksmallen, 147. 

Maderia Islands, 139. ■ 
Madison, 66. ^•'''" 

Maine, fugitives from 1675, loi. 
Maine, German settlement in, 

204. 
Mallery, 19, 21, 5. 
Malpractice case, 209. 
Man, 18, 81. 
Maning, 241. 
Manning, 4, 5, 159, 73. 
Mannon, 162. 
Mansfield, 2, 133, 204. 
Mansier, 36. 

Mansur, 29, 105, S5, 230. 
Mansur, arms of, 202. 
Manzer, ;^2. 
Marble, 213. 
Marblehead, Mass., 203. 
Marietta, 268. 
Markham, 23. 
Marrow, 38. 

Marshall, 7, 135,37. -C^3» 9. ^2- 

Marston, 130, 62, 3, 5, 78, 2t.x), 
12. 

Martin, 234, 5, 40, 57, 149. 

Martine, 6. 

Martindale, 16. 

Maryland, Revolutionary Rec- 
ords, 227. 

Maryland , wills, 257,92. 

Maryland, Germans of, 257, S. 

Mascoll, 177. 

Mason, 53, 66, 159, 86, 2S9. 

Maston, 205, 7. 

Mastons, 159. 

Masury, 52, 3, 75. 

Maul, 165. 

Maverick, 130, 42, 5, 20S, 32. 

Maxum, 22. 

May, 14. 

Mayi>ee, Maybie, 175. 

Mayflower passengers, graves of, 

61. 
Majnard, 151. 
Meacham, 17S. 
Mcachell, 163. 
Meade, 66. 
Meads, 234, 83. 
Meakins, Meckens, 147. 
Mear, 161. 
Mebor, 1 78. 
Metlicine in 1660, 20S. 
Meed?, 239. 
Meking, 205, 7. 



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302 



INDEX TO VOL. II. 



Melville, 151. 
Mennonites, 260. 
Menseaw, 200. 
l^enseard, 200. 
Meriman, iS. 
Merriam, 45, 58. 
Merwin, 16. 
Meslery, 178. 
Messer, 47, iii, 16, 201. 
Metcalf, 226. 
Methuen, Mass., 115. 
McClarry, 179.^ 
McClintic, 79. ' 
McGinley, 185. 
McGraw, 16. 
Mclntire, 80. 
McKee, 199. 
McKeny, 163. 
McMalley, 163. 
McPhattage, 152. 
McVein, 21. 
McWain, 90. 
. Mid— 



-, 140. 
Middleloa, Mass., 156. 
■Mighill, 135. 
Miles, 155. 
Mills, 45 ,"6, 54, 82. 
Miller, 163, 75. 
Millett, 206. 
Millington, 246. 
Miner, 282, 3, 6. 
Miriisters, maintenance of, 153. 
Mirick, 34. 
Mitchellson, 204. 
Molton, 209. 
Mooars, 1 16. 
Moody, 130. 
Moore, Moores, Moors, 9, 12, 

4. 5i 58, 131- 
Morconibe, 143. 
More, 164, 75, 8. 
Morehouse, 19. 
Morgan, 28 1., 6, 7. 
Mowry, 292. 
Morse, 9, 122, 3, 136. 
Morrill, 1 10, 210. 
Moses, 162. 
Moss, 21. 

Mould, 167, 2S5-7. 
Moulton, 212. 
Mountjoy, i. 
Muddle, 171. 
Munday, 55. 
Mungy, Mounjoy, 162. 
Munjoy, 176. 
Mannings, 139. 
Munroe, 59. 
Murdock, 2S7. 
Murray, 216a. 
Muse, 2. 
J^luzzy, 8, 9. 
Myrick, 198. 
Mystic, Ct.j 229. 
Mystic side, 92. 



Neale, 161, 7. 

Needham, 4, 133, 66, 205, 7. 

Needham town, 35. 

Neeld, 187, 8. 

Neff, 9. 

Negro, Newport, 183. 

Negro, 149. 

Negus, 10, 12, 139, 204. 

Neinberg, 194. 

Nelson, 135. 

Nerbor, 50. 

Nesmith, 113. 

Newbury, Mass., B. & M. D., 

136, 7. 

Newbee, 24. 

Newcomb, iii, 216a. 

Newell, 12, 108, 219, 93. - 

Newhall, 57, 8, 190. 

Newman, 216. 

Newmarsh, 143. 

Newspapers, early colonial, Ger- 
man, 263. 

Newton, iii. 

New England in the West, 266. 

New Haven, Vt., 151. 

New T,ondon, 64, 283. 

New York Rev. soldiers, 151. 

Nichols, 52, 68, 78, 90, 104,32, 
8, 40. 

Nicholson, 128, 130, 142, 54, 
206, 8. 

Nick, 128, 9, 42. 

NicoUett, 160. ■ 

Nixon, 159, 63. 

Norcross, 228. 

Norfolk, Ct., 57. 

Norman, 12, 129,206. 

Norris, 1 45, 56, 7, 8, 9, 60, 2. 

Northey, 206. 

Northrop, 24. 

Norton, 9, 94, 131. 

Nottage, 28. 

Noyes, 137. 

Nurse, 140, 41, 60, 3, 295. 

Nutting, 22S. 

Oaks, 151. 

Obins, 150. 

Odding, 29s. 

O'Farrall, 184. 

Ogilvie, 54, 5. 

Ohio, 266. 

Ohio Company, 268. 

Old, 20. 

Olds, 22, 23. 

Oldham, 92. 

Oleo, 20. 

Oliver, 150, 63. 

Ong, 8. 

Orchard, 8. 

Ordinance of 1787, 267. 

Ordway, 143. 

Oriskany battle, 203. 

Ormes, 176. 



Ormsby, 143, 212, 3. 

Orne, 145, 176. 

Orton, 24. 

Osborne, 22, 132, 78. 

Osgood, I, 41, 134. 

Otis, 239. 

Otter Creek, Vt., 151. 

Packard, 241, 2, 52. 
Paddleford, 234, 46. 
Painter, 97, gtf 
Palatines, 259. 
Palfrey, 205. 

Palmer, 212, 29, 34, 45' 93- 
Parker, 22, 135, 78, 80, 286. 
Parkhurst, 242, 52. 
- Parmeter, 203, 8. 
Parmetor, 142. 
Parmitter, 130. 
Parnell, 163. 
Parry, 187. 
Parsons, 290. 
Partridge, 15, 220. 
Parvin, 150. 
Patch, 12. 
Patterson, 25, 
Pattey, 206. 
Paul, 209, II. 

Payne, 9, 10, 8, 132,43, 51. 
Peabody, 2, 252. 
Pears, 145, 6. 
Pearse, 3, 136, 52. 
Pease, 134, 60, 78. 
Peaslee, 44. 
Peck, 241, 52. 
Peford, 178. 
Pendleton, 66, 143. 
Pengry, 138. 
Penn, 50. 
Pennsylvania German names, 

205. 
Pennsylvania, Germans in, 256. 
Pennell, 161, 81. 
Pension records, 74. 
Pentman, 178. 
Pequot, Ct., 229. 
Perkins, 4, 143. 
Perley, 8, 104. 
Person, 133, 4. 
Perry, 143. 
Pester, 143, 
Peters, 140, 63, 76. 
Petersburg, Va., 66. 
Pethriche, 163. 
Phantom ship, 99. 
Phelps, 4, 167, 78, 205, 26, 44- 
Philbrook, 226. 
Phillips, 50, 135, 44, 200. 
Phippen, Phippeny, 156, 76. 
Phipps, 161, 
Pickard, 135. 
Pickett, 283, 4. 
Pickering, 157, 61, 2, 7, 252. 
Pickman, 2, 161, 76, 205. 



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INDEX TO VOL. II. 



303 



Pickworth, 163, 206. 
Pidge, 2 1 6a, 219. 
Pierce, 50, 8, 90, 200. 
Pike, 91, 136, 62, 76. 
Pinnion, 144. 
PKcfter, 224. 

Pitman, i, 10, 28, 30, 78,208. 
Pitts, 204. 

Piatt, 17, 8, 9, 20, I, 2, 136. 
Plum, 24. 
Pod, 138. 
Polly, 67. 
Pontiac, 260. 
Pope, 33, 52, 207, 78. 
Pool, 243. 
Poor, 178. 

Porter, 4, 131, 2, 3, 45, 54, 5, 
7, 60, 3, 5, 207, 40, 5, 6, 52. 
Post, 252. 
Potter, 4, 57, 207, 34, 8, 41. 3, 

52, 93- 
Powell, 18, 9, 23, 149, 56. 
Powers, 79. 
Powland, 161, 76. 
Pousland, 176. 
Prentis, Prentice, 64, 96,7, lOO, 

282-6. 
Preson, 167. 
Presson, Preston, 13, 63, 136, 

163. 
Pratt, 58, 113. 
Price, 9, 130, 3, [50, 129,45, 53, 

5. 7.9.] 
Prichard, 178. 
Prime, 4^, 5. 
Prince, 51, 2, 3, 131, 41, 5, 6, 

58,61. 
Pringle, 184. 
• Pritchard, 41. 
Proctor, 13, 159, 66. 
Pryor, 15. 
Pudney, 145. 
Pugh, 183/ 
Punnell, 131. 
Purchase, 131, 3, 7, 3, 4. 
Purmot, 239. 
Putnam, 3, 4, 29, 51, 2, 3, 133, 

4, 140, I, 54, 5, 6, 60, 2, 3, 

4,, 75, 215, 7,8, 31. 
Puthirch, 107. 
Pynson, 176. 
Pynchon, 291. 
Pygan, 2S7. 

Quakers, 1,4, 133, 205, 8. 
Questenberg, 60. ^• 

Quilton, 50. 
Quisenberry, 60. 

Ragley, 14. 
Rainsford, 139. 
Ramesden, 207. 
Ramsdale, 204. 
Rand, 293. 
Randell, 24, 224. 



Rantoul, loi. 

Ravel, 150. 

Ray, 123. 

Rayment, Raymond, 4, 132, 3, 

47, 284, 5. 
Rea, 253. 
Read, Reed, 3, 4, 47, 82, 108, 

43. 5' 77, 224. 
Reade, 165. ^ 

Record commissioners, 61. 
Redemptioners, 261. 
Redington, 253. 
Reddington, 13. 
Redfin, 283, 4, 7. 
Redman, 211,2. 
Reid, 188, 9. 
Remington, 135. 
Renfro, 126. . 

Revolutionary, 63. 
Revolutionary prisoners, 183. 
Rex, 280. 
Rhoades, 232. 
Rhodes, 12, 139, 33, 207. 
Rice, 22, 3, 66. 
Rich, 163, 7, 207. 
Richards, 3, 160. 
Richardson, 105, 14, 25, 95, 

201, 53. 
Rider, 137. 
Right, 234. 
Ripley, 247. 
Ritter, 47. 
Roach, 284. 
Roafe (Rolfe), 136, 7. 
Roberts, 4, 5, 6, 94, l6l, 83, 

283. 
Robbins, 205. 
Robinson, 104, 37, 44, 59, 60, 

76, 95- 
Roby, 1 89. 
Rock, 10. 
Rockwell, 16, 240. 
Rodick, 180. 
Rogers, 10, 97, 9, 100, 38, 9, 

76, 232, 84-6. 
Ropes, 131, 62, 77. 
Rosebrook, 123. 
Rosse, 5. 

Roots, 45, 133, 47, 60, 204, 8. 
Rowe, 19, 158. 
Rowell, 9, 149. 
Rowen, 158. 
Rowland, 3, 10, 100. 
Rowley Meeting House, i ; B. 

M. D., 135. 
' Rowley, 19. 

Ruck, 92, 141, 63, 5, 7, 204. 
Ruggles, 253. 
Rumerel, 178. 
Russell, 210, II, 13. 

Sacryder, 44. 
Saffin, 50. 
Sailes, 197. 
Salem, Mass., 133. 



Salem, Mass., census, 166, 7. 

meeting house, 71, 100, 54, 
6, 7,9, 60, 2. 

town house, 162, 3. 

tax list of 1683, 167. 

prison, 102. 

schools, 156, 8, 62. 

militia, 160. 

records, 153. 

settlers in, 154. 
Sailer, Salle, 32. 
Salmon, 3, 133, 7, 44, 55, 207. 
Salstontonstall, 5. 
Salter, 50. 
Saltus, 214. 
Sanborn, 253. 
Sanders, 120, 45. 
Sanford, 151. 
Sargent, 200. 
Saunders, 100, 12. 
Savage, 50. 
Savory, 137. 
Sawyer, 52, 136, 7. 
Sawtelle, 120. 
Saxton, 241. 
Scales, 253. 
Scarlet, 164, 6. 
Sckofield, 124, 93, 4. 
Scotch-Irish, 63, 255. 
Scott, 79. 
Seats, 152. 
Sechwell, 5. 
Selman, 4. 
Senier, 253. 
Sergeant, 12. 
Severence, 44, 5, 6. 
Sevvall, 166, 75. 
Seymour, 44, 5, 6. 
Shaffen, 205, 7. 
Shafiin, 177. 
Shatswell, 4, 131. 
Shatluck, 4, 133. 
Shapleigh, 57. 
Shaplin, 177. 
Shattock, 205. 
Shattuck, 207. 
Sheaner, 161. 
Shelburne, Lord, 166. 
Sheldon, 44, 5. 97. i^3. 72. 
Shepardson, 215, 6, 7, 21. 
Sheward, 152. 
Sherman, 17, 8, 20, i, 2, 3, 5, 

58, 293. 
Sherwood, 24, 7. 
Shoars, 184. 
Shoemaker, 193. 
Short, 137, 2i6a, 222. 
Sibley, 163,66. 
Silsby, 159, 78- 
Simonds, 78. 
Simons, 253. 
Simmons, 163. 
Skery, 205, 8. 
Skerry, 3, 132, 46, 61. 



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INDEX TO VOL. II. 



Skeil, 1 6. 
Skillen, i6i. 
Skimner, 176, 7. 
Skinner, 142, 74, 206. 
■ Skolfield, 179. 
Slade,82, 275. 
Slapp, 234, 42, 6, 53. 
Slaughter, 65. 
Smale, 205, 6. 
Small, 4, 133. 
Smead, 98, 8. 
Smedley, 24. 

Smith, I, 6, 22, 48, 50, 2, 129, 
33. 4» 51. 5. 58, 9. 63, 78, 
83,209, 10,23, 34>53.S4, 5- 
Snell, 253. 
Snelling, 163. 
Snow, 48. 

Snydan, Sardam, 213.- 
Somerly, 8, 137, 43,4- 
Somerville, 66, 
Southertown Ct., 229. 
Southwick, 4, 133, 46, 54, 78, 

205, 7, 8. 
Spalding, 151. 

Sparhawk, 48, 65. 

Spear, 36, 47. 

Spencer, i, 25, 122, 33. 

Spooner, 133, 205. 

Spottsylvania, Va., 66. 

Spottswoode, 66. 

Sprague, 19, 21, 2, 3, 247, 53. 

Spratt, 149. 

Springer, 286. 

Squire, 18, 151. 

Stackhouse, 3, 132, 46, 7, 206. 

Stackinell, 149. 

Stafford, 79. 

Standish, 61. 

Stanford, 161. 

Stanton, 229. 

Stanyan, 210, 13. 

Starr, 46, 163, 209, 10, 12, 86. 

Stebbins, 24, 2S5, 6. 

Steavens, 9. 

Steavenson, 54. 

Stearns, 178. 

Stephens, 234. 

Sterling, Iron Works, 213. 

Sterns, 245. 

Stevens, 50, 114, 34, 38, 158, 
60, 75, 216. 

Stickney, 136, 24. 

Stiles, iS, 93. 

Stileman, Stillman, 145, 55, 290. 

Stoddard, 34, 139, 243. 

Stokes, 19, 20. 
"Stone, 58, 130, 51, 78, 205. 

Stony Creek, battle of, 54. 
. Stonington, Ct., 228. 

Store, 151. 

Storrs, 190, 235,6, 7,41, 3, 53. 

Story, 129. 

Stout, 83. 



Stoughton, 94, 142. 

Stow, 48. 

Streeter, 226. 

Strickland, 94. 

Strotter, 66. 

Sturdisant, 15. 

St. Johnsbury, Vt., 277. 

Sumner, 16. 

Sutton, 137. 

Swean, 36, 48. 

Sweetland, 209. 

Sweetser, 38. 

Swett, 8. 

Swinnerton, 52, 3, 161. 

Swiss emigrants to America, 260. 

Symonds, 4, 5, 13, 50, 159. 

Taft, 67. 

Taggart, 241. 

Taintorx, 230. 

Tapley, 164, 72, 3. 

Tappin, 53. 

Talcut, 23. 

Tarr, 179. 

Tanley, 177. 

Tarleton, 289. 

Taylor, 27, 66, 77, 128, 49, 78. 

Tebbets, 192. 

Tecumthe, 269. 

Temple, 68. 

Temple, N, H., 116. 

Ten Brock, 67. 

Tharley, 136. 

Thayer, 120. ' 

Thistle, 177. 

Thorn, 66. 

Thomas, 147, 241. 

Thompson, 66, 107, 30, 8. 

Thorn, 84. 

Thome, 173. 

Thorndike, 155. 

Ticknor, 239, 44. 

Till, 50. 

Tilley, 177. 

Tilton, 1S6, 219. 

Tingle, 214. 

Tingley, 214. 

Titcomb, 115, 36, 77. 

Titbingmen, 42, 167. 

Titus, 219, 24. 

Tncrson, 150. 

Tobacco smoking, 3. 

Todd, 13, 17, 135. 

Tompkins, 167. 

Tompson, 204. 

Toothacre, 1S2. 

Tomson, 5, 16, 139. 

Tongue, 282, 3. 

Tories, German, 263. 

Torrey, 22, 3. 

Towle, 51. 

Towne, 52, 3, loS, 40, 41, 293. 

Trask, 163, 72, 5, 205. 

Traske, 4, 133, 48. 

Tree, 164, 77, 8. 



Truax, 80. 
Tuck, 127, 46, 213. 
Tucker, 70. 
Turland, 20S. 
Turner, 98, 155, 7, 236. 
Tuttle, 6, 7, 8, 130. 
Twist, 52, 3. 
Twombly, 123. 
Tyler, 25, 67. 

Ulster, Ireland, 256. 
Unton, 163. 
Upham,58, 153. 
Upton, 206, 7. 
Uselton, 8, 12, 3. 
Usher, 50. 

Valyar, 241. 

Van Doren, 197. 

Van Ness, 46. 

Vandersen, 17. 

Varnum, 41, 109, 201. 

Varny, 13. 

Veal, 203, 6. 

Veary, 178. 

Veren,2,8, 13, iS7> 73^8,205, ^ 

Very, I, 2. 

Vincen, 3, 134, 45. 

Vincent, 54. 

Vine, 286. 

Vinton, 144. 

Virginia counties, 63, 6. 

Virginia parish histories, 66. 

Virginia in the Middle Wes 
268. 

Vooden, Vowden, 177. 

Vowden, 163. 

Vral, 226. 

Wade, 4, 5, 6, 48, 135, 205. 
Wainwright, 45. 
Wait, 10, 51, 92, 129, 32, 9. 
Wakefield, 161, 4, 76. 
Waker, 9. 
Walcutt, 165. 
Walfield, 161.- 
Walker, 58, 177. 
Wallace, 183. 
^Walling, 152. 
Wallington, 137. 
Wallis, 161. 
Walter, 6. 
Walton, 203, 8. 
War of 1812, 54. 
Ward, 147, 51, 7, 66, 205, 7. 
Warner, 25, 6, 7, 67, 94. 
Warnings from towns, 35, 27 
Warren, 293. 
Washington Street, 266. 
Washington, 202. 
Waters, 69, 157, 231,41, 7- 
Waterman, 234, 5, 6, 41, 6. 
Watkins, 234. 
Watts, 143, 276. 



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30s 



Wats, 72. 
Weare, 107. 

Webb, 151, 8, 9, 25, 8, 50, 61. 
Weber, 8. 

, Webber, 48, 96, 149. 
Websfpr^ 137, 51. 

Weeks, 186. 

Welch, 5, 24. 

Weld, 151. ■ 

Wells, 96, 253. 

Wellman, 144. 

West, 4, 5, 129, 30, 204. 

Westgate, 2, 177. 

Wetherell, 284. 

Weyland, 55. ^. 

Wharton, 4, 133, 205. 

Wheatley, 233, 6, 7, 42, 5» 7- 

Wheeler, 3, 12, 23, 7, 137, 228. 

Whipple, 5, 61, 2. 

Whitaker, 242. 

Whitterton, 225. 

Whitcomb, 47. 
I ^Vhite, 4, 10, 79, 109, 19, 30, 
Hf 201. 
i' W^hiting, 15, 37. 



Whittock, 16. 
Whitmore, 253. 
Whitney, 67, 151. ' 
Whittier, 113, 20, 201. 
Whittricker, 204. 
Whittridge, 13. 
Wiggin, 122, 209, 10. 
Wilbur, 293. 
Wills' Hill, 156. 
Wills, 124. 

Willes, 236, 7, 9, 42, 54 
Williams, 66, 147, 61, 

32. 7, 72, 3- 
Wiliard, 167. 

Willoughby, 184. 

Wilkenson, 173, 203, 6. 

Wilier, iS. 

Wingard, So. 

Winslow, 61. 

Winship, 120, 1S6. 

Winsor, 60. 

Winter, 53, 204. 

Winthrop, 4, 5, 229, 32 

Wiswall, 5S, 139. 

Wood, 204, 5, 34, 5, 47 



Woodall, 137. 
Woodbury, 146, 7, 61, 254. 
Woodis, I. 
Woodman, 136, 7. 
Woodruff, 146. 
^Woods, I, 4, 10, 18, 20, 3, 7, 
^ 58. S4, 105, 24. 

f Woodus, 129. 

Woodwas, 50. 
Woodward, 20, i, 36. 
Woodwell, 159. 
5, 201, Wolcott, 99, 100. 
Wolsin, 1 98. 
Wooken, 171. 
Wooland, 177. 
Woolen, 147. 
Worcester, 276. 
Wormer, 17. 
Wormstead, 16. 
Worsley, 139, 40. 
Wright, 24, 94, 187, 8, 97, 134,. 

8, 41. 
Wyatt, 159. 

, 54. Yorke, 183. 



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